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Dr. George Adebiyi
  • 69 years old
  • Date of birth: Mar 30, 1947
  • Place of birth:
    Igosun, Kwara State, Nigeria
  • Date of passing: Oct 8, 2016
  • Place of passing:
    Starkville, Mississippi, United States
Let the memory of Dr. George be with us forever

This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Dr. George Adebiyi, 69, born on March 30, 1947 and passed away on October 8, 2016. We will remember him forever.

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If Considering Giving a Gift ...
In lieu of flowers and in honor of his passion for education, gifts can be made toward the Dr. George Adebiyi Memorial Endowed Scholarship through the MSU Foundation online at

www.msufoundation.com

(Please indicate Dr. Adebiyi as the Honoree at the bottom of the "Give Now" page.)
 
Dr. Adebiyi clearly valued and encouraged diversity on MSU campus, resulting scholarship awards will be applied inline with this vision.

Memorial Tributes
This tribute was added by William Adelekan on 21st November 2016

"Tribute posted on behalf of Ruth Luzili Mulindi-King


The Late Professor George Adebiyi

People who have had an impact on our lives somehow stay with us even when we are separated by time and distance. So it comes as a shock when you receive the news that such a person is no longer in this world.

I met Dr George Adebiyi when he was a post-graduate student working on his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at University of Manchester, UK. His topic was Heat Transfer. Coming from Kenya, I had never met any Nigerians, let alone someone studying science at this level. The first thing that struck me about him was his dedication to his research. He often stayed up late in freezing temperatures to read the results of his experiments.

There were two of us female Kenyan students pursuing music while George was one of three Engineering students that we came to know well.

If bad company ruins good morals, then good company must surely be worth its weight in gold. I look back with immense gratitude that God placed me among Christian friends who strengthened my faith and enabled me to survive the perils of an overtly permissive era in western society.

We cooked and ate together, went to Platt Church and sang together. He came from a musical background. I was amazed to hear that one of his parents played a keyboard instrument.  We went on Christian camps to various places including Switzerland.

We also played Scrabble. George was undoubtedly the brainy one. Sometimes he scored 40 on a single word. If I remember rightly, it was rumoured that George was the brightest student that his department had had in 15 years. Yet, despite his considerable intellect, George was someone I would describe as humble. In fact he was blessed with this kindly smile that cleverly masked his genius.

Although he wasn’t studying music he found the discipline of harmony fascinating and could sometimes approach it from a purely mathematical angle and arrive an interesting result. Moreover, this made me feel I was studying something worthwhile.

After we moved from the halls of residence, I had no piano on which to practise. It was George and my other friends that helped transport a throw-away-piano on which I would eventually practise for many memorable hours. I still treasure my very first music stand that he and these friends gave me for my birthday.

We travelled freely in his green mini, which I think he bought for £50! It always rained in Manchester and sometimes the wipers on that mini didn’t work at all!  Also, the absence of a heater meant that the car steamed up terribly in the winter months.  I distinctly remember the musical sound of the changing gears. I also remember, at the end of a journey, the reluctant feeling of having to disembark from the comparative warmth of the mini into the freezing Manchester fog.

In a discussion (of which we had many) George would often answer a question with question of his own. This encouraged you to think and come up with your own answer. Great teachers often do this. He had a great sense of humour too, with a gift for pun. We lived on Henrietta Street at Ashton-under-Lyne. In time our road became Henry-ate-a-street!

I met George again after many years when he visited the UK about ten years ago. Despite the passage of time, he was still his calm, jovial self. As it happened, I had just returned from my mother’s burial in Kenya. “You mean to say you too have killed off your parents!”  He quipped. Only George could have said something like this, conveying information, empathy and humour all condensed in one short sentence. I thank God for the gift of such a lovely person.

It feels unreal to think that George is no longer with us.  

To all his family, colleagues, friends and students, I send my heartfelt sympathy. May the Lord comfort and strengthen you deeply at this time.

Ruth Luzili Mulindi-King"

This tribute was added by L M on 15th November 2016

"My deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Dr George Adebiyi.may you all find comfort in knowing that our Heavenly Father hold out the hope of a resurrection for our dead loved ones.His son Christ Jesus,says at ( John 5:28,29) "all those in the memorial tomb will here his voice and come out".our dead love ones are held in gods memory and very soon he will resurrect them to a paradise earth.(Psalms 3:9-11 & 29).(Job14:13-15)says he has yearning to do so.May you all continue to hold the precious memories of your dearly beloved George close to your hearts and know that one day soon we will see the ones we loss in death again."

This tribute was added by David Wheatley on 14th November 2016

"I am very saddened to learn of George's untimely death.  I first met George as an 18 year old in Port Harcourt when he applied for a Shell Scholarship.  It was immediately obvious that he was an outstanding scholar and I was delighted when he went on to gain First Class Honours at Manchester University.  He was also a gentle kindly young man and both courteous and thoughtful in his relationships with those around him.  It gave me considerable pleasure when he re contacted me a couple of years ago and thanked me for being instrumental in helping him on his initial academic journey.  I had looked forward to continuing periodic contact, but this will have now to wait until we meet our ultimate destiny.  A life well lived and a credit to his Country.  My thoughts are with the family at this tragic time."

This tribute was added by Adeola Ajala on 13th November 2016

"So sad to lose a man who is not just a lecturer but a father to me. You taught me science but most importantly the morals u taught me i cling to. You made me see the connection between God and science. I was with you few days before you traveled to America discussing how i will be part of your research institute not knowing that is the last time i will see you. I am deeply sorrowed when i heard that you are gone to be with the Lord. I could only take solace in the fact that i know you will spend eternity in heaven. I am grateful to God that your life passed through mine. Your legacy lives on in me.

AJALA, Adeola Emmanuel."

This tribute was added by Sam Aweda on 8th November 2016

"Nigeriaworld Feature Article - Prof. George Adebisi Adebiyi (03/1947-10/2016) - One brain so sad & sorry to miss  


Highly recognized and honoured in the USA where he was a Professor and latterly a Professor Emeritus, yet he did not forget his origin. For a good many years he was returning home to teach in Nigerian universities. Upon retirement he has been on the faculty of the Nigerian Baptist Convention's 'Bowen University' at Iwo. I have heard that, in consonance with his passion for Solar Energy exploitation, his Quarters at Bowen if fully solar-powered.
URL: http://nigeriaworld.com/feature/publication/aweda/110416.html"

This tribute was added by Benjamin Morohunfola on 6th November 2016

""O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?" I have just read, O George, of your passing on! We have parted a long, long time ago but I never thought the next time I would hear of you is of your having said 'Adieu' to this world. Our time together at the Kwara State College of Technology was a time worth reliving. We were close, together with your brother Lawrence - your family and mine. You and I were together in the musical ensemble of Henry Jackson, you played the organ, while I sang the Tenor part. Then, of course, we met too regularly whenever anything was needed in the Registry where I served as Deputy Registrar. It was with a pang of heart that I attended the burial of your brother Lawrence who had established a private hospital at the house on Taiwo Road in Ilorin after leaving Kwaratech where he had been the Medical Director while you rose up to become Director School of Technology before you left us for Bida, as already stated by your friends who had written your epitaph. You introduced solar energy to us at the Poly and you had good students who followed your footsteps. So, the end has finally come. We both had "Ile Agbopa" connection, you through Mummy while I through Daddy. Much has been said about your Christian life and very well said. I thank God for your life. The solace is in the words of Jesus: "He that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live". May our Heavenly Father comfort your family, especially your good wife and the children and grant you eternal rest in the bosom of our Lord Jesus Christ. Adieu, George. Till we meet at Jesus' feet."

This tribute was added by Sam Aweda on 5th November 2016

"http://nigeriaworld.com/feature/publication/aweda/110416.html"

This tribute was added by Sam Aweda on 5th November 2016

"Nigeriaworld Feature Article - Prof. George...

nigeriaworld.com/feature/publication/





FEATURE ARTICLE: Sam Aweda: Friday, November 4, ... I know it is through this publication that many of his associates and students at the University of Lagos, ..."

This tribute was added by AdeDoyin Adebiyi on 2nd November 2016

"Dad,

I waited for so long to find the perfect words to illustrate the depth and breadth of your impact in my life. Of course, the words continue to fail me and I just am learning to breathe and thank you for the gift of who I am. I never imagined living the rest of my days without you, but with all that is within me, I will aim to live a life that continues your legacy. I'll miss you sorely, but I will cherish the memories. I will bask in your sense of humor and try to put a smile on my family's faces. I will consider my life choices and path with your exemplary model that you set. Thank you for being my papa, and one of my greatest cheerleaders every step of the way.

Until we meet again,

Your favorite 28-year-old."

This tribute was added by Tejumade Makanjuola on 1st November 2016

""Words cannot express the shock I had on hearing the news about your sudden demise. It is difficult to believe". I believe you have gone to rest in the bosom of the Lord. May your soul rest in peace!

Tejumade Makanjuola."

This tribute was added by Victor Olaniyi on 27th October 2016

"Dear George, it's been almost 3 weeks now since your unexpected transition and I am only getting to write now because I was in so much shock about the suddenness of the event that I just shut down. I know the usual doctrinal correctness about God needing you more up there but I am not in that mood right now. Our last discussion some weeks ago was focused on the challenging work of your new vision about helping the new generation in Nigeria to acquire value-adding skills in the field of solar technology through the establishment of your Solar Energy Institute in Nigeria. I now accept that you have gone to rest from all your earthly labors of true and benevolent services and I bid you God's peace and joy in eternity.

I recall the moment 37 years ago when we first met at that interview at Federal Polytechnic, Bida. You were the brilliant and exceedingly visionary young Rector of a new institution and I was the neophyte seeking entry to the world of academic teaching and research. We took to each other instantly as kindred spirits, united through both our faith and our commitment to energy sustainability. You not only encouraged and mentored my journey of discovery in the field of solar technology, you instantly invited me to be part of your family as a brother. Knowing you enhanced my life just like you enhanced the lives of many others you interacted with. You will be truly missed but we are grateful for your life of true service to your circles of communities- of faith, of academics, of solar technology, and of kith and kin.

Farewell my friend and brother. We will miss you here but your presence at the eternal throne of grace will comfort the souls of your wife, children and grand children you left behind and the multitude of friends and witnesses whose lives you have touched."

This tribute was added by Olufunke Magbagbeola on 25th October 2016

"May the Lord comfort you wife and your entire family. Who are we to question God. He gives and He takes away . Glory be to His name. May your soul rest in peace"

This tribute was added by Kemi Oguntona on 23rd October 2016

"You were always like a grandpa to me. you were so lighthearted and encouraging anytime you were around; even when life wasn't very forgiving. Your presence and demeanor were an inspiration for me to always be a better version of myself and to do my best in all areas even in school (I still have those math books you gave me the last time we saw one another). Even though it pains me to see you go, I am thankful that you were there to be a light to me and others while still living. Your impact is as immeasurable as your heart. I will miss you dearly, and will continue to work to make you proud. You are in a much better and happier place now sir and for that, I thank God. May you rest in peace.

Thank you sir, forever and always."

This tribute was added by Tobi Oguntona on 23rd October 2016

"Uncle George was such a light in the darkness always there with an a encouraging word and smile. I remember him always trying to motivate me in anything I did whether Ian was school athletics or any goal I had he was always there to encourage, and sometimes with a reward at the end. I thank God I had the chance to know such an amazing man and I know God is happy to have him back.

Thanks for the memories.
Tobi."

This tribute was added by Sola Oduko on 19th October 2016

"This internet interview serves as Prof George Adebiyi's Autobiography as at 2009

/
'Sola Oduko


                           PROF GEORGE ADEBISI ADEBIYI

Nigeria | 4 July 2009 10:51 CET
2  Comments
Adebiyi avails self as solution to Nigeria’s energy crunch
Source: Emmanuel Ajibulu - modernghana.com
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Professor George Adebiyi
…Says he attended same college with President Yar'Adua
Professor George Adebiyi is a seasoned University doyen in Mississippi State University (USA); his research interests largely focus on Solar/Renewable Energy/Fuel Cell applications, Mathematical modelling of advanced energy systems including Thermal Regenerators (such as Packed Bed Storage Systems utilizing Phase-Change Materials), Heat and Mass Transfer Regenerators (such as Desiccant Dehumidifiers, Crop Dryers). Others are: Formulations for the Thermodynamic Properties of Substances and Development of Algorithms for use in Computer Property Codes, Computer-Aided Thermodynamic Analysis and Evaluation of Thermal Systems, Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer Applications in Systems Design and Analysis, Piping networks system design, to mention a few.
In an interactive online (electronic) parley with Emmanuel Ajibulu (Modernghana representative in Nigeria), the Professor responded to a number of issues that can bring back hope to Nigeria's energy crunch. The interaction was quite participatory and interesting as the energy guru injects some sense of humour to the question and answer session.
Excerpt:

1. Can I meet you sir?

Ans: I was born in Nigeria, a native of Igosun in Kwara State. My early education began in Ejigbo. Later, I attended Senior Primary School at Laminga (midway between Keffi and Nassarawa) from 1955 to 1956, and Senior Primary School, Bauchi (1957 to 1958). I attended Government College, Keffi (1959 to 1963), and King's College, Lagos (1964 to 1965) for the HSC. I studied Mechanical Engineering at the University of Manchester, Manchester, England, and graduated with a 1st Class Hons. degree in 1969. I worked for a year (1969 to 1970) as a Research Associate at the Central Electricity Research Laboratories in Leatherhead and returned to the University of Manchester for the Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering. I completed my Ph.D. in December 1972, although the award of the degree was dated March 1973. From January 1973 to December 1973 I worked with Shell in Lagos. I was appointed a Lecturer at the University of Lagos and worked there from December 1973 to July 1975. My next appointment was with now Kwara Polytechnic, Ilorin (July 1975 to 1979). At Ilorin I was beneficiary of a Unesco Fellowship to Huddersfield Polytechnic where I earned an Advanced Diplo ma in Further Education (a University of Leeds Award) in 1977. I later served as Director of the School of Technology from 1978 to 1979. In July 1979, I assumed duty as Rector (then Principal) of the Federal Polytechnic, Bida. I continued there as Rector until 1985. Around 1983, we established a Solar Energy Research Centre at the Polytechnic. The Centre continues to provide a focus for students' projects as well as research by Lecturers in the area of solar energy applications. In 1984, I was away from the Federal Polytechnic on sabbatical leave that gave me the first opportunity to work in the U.S.A. The time was spent at Rust College, Holly Springs in Mississippi. Rust College is a Liberal Arts College and is a Private University. I was a Visiting Professor of Physics. On my return to Nigeria I spent 3 months (May to July 1985) with the Solar Energy Centre of the then University of Sokoto, Sokoto. In August 1985, I returned to the U.S.A. this time to the Mississippi State University as a Visiting Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. I was promoted to full Professor with tenure in 1991. I co-authored a Classical Thermodynamics textbook with a colleague (Dr. Lynn D. Russell) in 1993. The book was translated to Spanish and is currently in print.
My father (now deceased) was an ordained Baptist Reverend who as far back as 1955 began a career as an Educationist and served in several civil service positions in the former Northern Region of Nigeria. My mother (also deceased) was the first woman to complete Standard 6 in Ilorin province in the 1930's, and she served until her death in 1983 as Church Organist everywhere we lived. Although I was born into a Christian family, it was not until 1960 that I got saved and became a Christian. I have often served as Church Pianist/Organist in Churches that I belong to. I currently play the piano at a Church in Columbus, Mississippi, which has a Missionary Pastor from Nigeria.
2. Can you share with the world what you think is causing persistent power failure in Nigeria?
Ans: I always dramatize the seriousness of power failure in much of Africa by pointing to a NASA picture of the Earth at night. (See the following web site, for example:http://www.novaspace.com/POSTERS/PHOTO/EBN.html ) Virtually all the continents are lit except Africa!
Let me now share some facts and figures that explain why Nigeria experiences vexing and perennial power failure. Nigeria currently has a population of around 140 million. In a recent interview, Nigeria's President announced that total electric generating capacity in the country was effectively below 3 GW. If you divide this by the population you will find that there is only about 20 W per person. Increasing generating capacity to 5 GW will raise this to a little over 35 W per person. The household bulbs we use are rated 25 W, 40 W, 60 W, or even 100 W. The 2-ft fluorescent lights consume around 20 W powers. Thus, if all the electricity generated is used exclusively in homes (with nothing for industries, businesses and commercial centres), there is just enough to light one bulb for every Nigerian. In actual fact, typically 50% of grid electricity is consumed in homes, while the commercial and industrial sectors account for about 25% each. Nigeria still has ways to go to generate at the 5 GW level. The Kainji Dam can only provide 960 MW (less than 1 GW). Not all the turbine units are in operation because water level in the reservoir is often low for a multitude of reasons including drought. The power from the dam is only about 500 MW to 600 MW most of the time. Also, there is an agreement that requires much of this power to be delivered to Niger Republic. This is necessary to avoid a situation where Niger Republic diverts much of river Niger to take care of its own needs for water power. Thus, on average less than 3 kWh of electricity can be supplied per household per day in Nigeria for the forseeable future. This assumes that all electricity generated is used entirely in houses and residences. Let us make a few comparisons. South Africa with a population of a little over 44 million has electric generating capacity of 30 GW. This translates to an annual per capita consumption of electricity of 4500 kWh. For Nigeria, the annual per capita consumption of electricity is estimated at between about 100 kWh and 135 kWh. Here in the U.S.A. the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) provides electric power to about 8 million people. TVA's generating capacity is currently 33 GW, and the average daily electrical energy sold per household in 2006 in Mississippi alone was 44 kWh per household per day. A daily average TVA sale to commercial and industrial customers for the same period was 220 kWh per customer. Ironically, during the summer months in Mississippi and other states in the TVA region, the weather is so hot that a ir conditioners have to run “full throttle”, and in July especially, TVA often cautions its customers to slow down on the use of air conditioners or else risk power loss.
Why is there persistent power failure in Nigeria? The answer is simply that supply is way below demand; the Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN) is generating less than 2% of the power needed (if the TVA, or even South Africa, record is taken as standard). In addition, there are human factors that make the power situation in Nigeria a lot worse. A source recently indicated that over 40% of generated electricity is lost. In recent years, thieves have stolen transmission line wires (only to resell to NEPA/PHCN), causing serious disruption to electricity supply. Even transformers have been stolen and resold. Pipelines supplying fuel to power stations have been sabotaged and vandalized. If fuel does not get to a power station, no power can be generated. There are lots of illegal power connections. As a result, there is shortfall in revenue that could be applied to improving electricity supply in the country. All these compound the problems and frustrate any effort being made to solve the crisis.
3. Why is there persistent power failure in Nigeria?
Ans: Conventional power generation uses fossil fuels (coal, gas, and oil), which are non-renewable and are being used up very rapidly. Fossil fuels take millions of years to form, and with heightened global demand they may be exhausted a lot sooner than later. The future of electrical power generation from fossil fuel combustion is threatened by escalating fuel prices and by adverse environmental consequences of large scale combustion of carbon-rich fuels. Combustion of these fuels unleashes intolerable amounts of carbon dioxide to the environment contributing to turning the Earth's atmosphere to a greenhouse with the harmful effect of producing global warming. In this regard, coal-fired plants, while offering electricity on the cheap is the worst culprit, and power utilities that propose these plants are increasingly incurring enormous (capital) costs in assuring adequate emissions control and carbon dioxide sequestration to minimize the pollution they unleash on the environment. Natural gas (mostly methane) also adds significant amounts of carbon dioxide to the environment. Meeting these challenges adds significant costs to electricity production from the use of the non-renewable primary energy resources. In other words, there is every indication that electricity production from the mix of conventional fossil fuels will occ ur in the future at increasing cost to consumers than the current levels. Nigeria is blessed with an abundance of renewable energy both as direct solar energy and indirect solar energy. Indirect solar energy includes water power in the form of hydroelectric power, wind power, bio-fuels derived from corn and other plants, biomass, and biogas from garbage and other biological wastes. Solar energy can be exploited directly in thermal applications (crop drying, water heating, distillation, solar cooking, refrigeration and air conditioning, thermal power generation) and in solar electricity production using photovoltaic converters.
Solar/Renewable energy is attractive principally because it is manna-like. It is a renewable energy resource. It is a widely distributed form of energy. In other words, it is available where needed; this eliminates the need for long transmission lines that could be easily disrupted by robbers and saboteurs. It is free. Only the energy converters cost money, and the investment needed is largely capital. Maintenance cost is generally minimal. It is a non-polluting form of energy. (As indicated already, fossil fuels are known to generate a lot of greenhouse gases that produce global warming and threaten the future of the planet. Solar energy is clean and safe to use. Electric generators pollute with the noxious emissions and the noise. Solar converters provide electricity without emissions and without noise.)
Attractive as solar energy is, there are challenges to be met in its exploitation: Solar insolation levels on the Earth's surface are generally low, and, therefore, collectors and solar converters must have large surface areas to meet even relatively low energy demand applications. For many locations in Nigeria, the amount of solar energy inflow exceeds 5 to 6 kWh per m2 per day, which is a typical threshold value needed for viable solar energy applications. Current technologies for solar cell production are energy intensive. Typical energy pay back periods are on the order of 6 to 11 years. New technologies are emerging, however, that significantly cut manufacturing costs and as a result make solar converters increasingly more affordable. Solar energy flow to the Earth occurs on a diurnal cycle. This intermittency imposes an energy storage requirement, which adds to the capital cost and reduces overall system efficiency. (Storage systems have regeneration efficiencies that can be as low as about 60% for thermal storage systems and as high as about 80% to 90% for battery storage.)
Can solar energy rescue Nigeria from its current energy crises? The honest answer is that solar energy alone cannot be the answer, but it can be a significant part of solving the problem. Let me begin by sharing some of the experiences of other countries: Solar water heating is saving on use of non-renewable energy in many parts of the world. An article by John Perlin (http://www.californiasolarcenter.org/history_solarthermal.html ) recalls the widely known fact that Israel requires its inhabitants to heat their water with the sun. “Today, more than 90% of Israeli households own solar water heaters.” California, Florida, and several states in the United States use solar water heaters extensively. The United States Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria, uses solar water heaters to enable self-sufficiency and lower use of fossil-fuels. Hot water is available even during routine black-outs. Solar thermal power stations are being built all around the world. A Wikipedia listing on this is indeed informative (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_solar_thermal_power_stations ). These include: An 11 megawatt PS10 solar power tower in Spain that produces electricity from the sun using 624 large movable mirrors called heliostats. Three hundred and fifty four (354) MW Solar Energy Generating Systems (SEGS) power plant in California, U.S.A. World Bank financed integrated solar thermal/combined-cycle gas-turbine power plants in Egypt, Mexico, and Morocco. Significant developments in the area of photovoltaics will foster widespread solar electricity generation in the very near future. For example, solar shingles are now available in the market place that can make solar electricity available to houses without using extra space other than the roof. Concentrating photovoltaic systems are being developed with a potential for increasing solar cell efficiencies to over 40%. California provides an example of how to tackle energy crises using a mix of approaches. California was forced to implement rolling black outs a few years ago because there was not sufficient power generated to meet the demand. Here is a summary of some measures adopted since that time to address the bigger issue of holding down power demand: Lighting accounted for an estimated 37% of electricity use per California household in 2006. Energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) use about a quarter as much electricity as incandescent light bulbs, and the CFLs last several times as long as the regular bulbs. The utilities heavily subsidized the CFL industry and brought down cost of CFLs from $5 to $10 dollars in 1999 to a mere 25 to 50 cents in the marketplace.
In summary, solar energy can complement other forms of energy available in Nigeria today. In the short- and medium-term, the use of solar energy ought to be focused on the following applications:
(1) Thermal applications such as heating and cooling, crop and food drying, cooking;
(2) Lighting applications that use energy-efficient CFL and LED light fixtures;
(3) Powering of low wattage electrical appliances such as energy-efficient TVs, fans, refrigerators and freezers, water pumps. Appliances like air conditioners are typically rated in the kilowatt range, and while they can be powered using solar electricity, the cost will be inevitably high.
Substituting solar energy for conventional energy in the home will provide succor for many households while making more of grid electricity available to industries and commercial units.
Can an individual solve Nigeria's energy crises? I wish! I am reminded of the proverbial rooster that claims credit for making the sun rise by its crowing! The magnitude of the problem calls for making prudent use of Nigeria's human talent. I am impressed at the tremendous contributions that Sons and Daughters of Nigeria have made, and continue to make the world over. Some have confidently asserted that if you go to any part of the world and you do not find a few Nigerians there, something must be wrong with that place. Frankly, I think this is an overstatement of what is anecdotally true.
We need to recapture a vision of great things that can be accomplished when we work together. There is currently a lot of excitement and interest everywhere (in Nigeria and other parts of the world) about solar energy, and I am excited that several companies now exist in Nigeria “doing solar.” I fear, however, that a lot of dupes seize on the public excitement to defraud unsuspecting customers. Someone needs to educate the public to discriminate between the genuine thing and what may be counterfeit. Government has a role to ensure safety and probity in the public arena.
I welcome State Governments that have embraced solar projects like solar street lighting. They should show transparency on such projects. How much do they cost? How good are they? It is a shame if the solar street lights fail prematurely. It is just as bad to pay a lot more than is necessary for such projects.

4. Why are you lecturing in Mississippi University in USA? Why not in a Nigerian University, or don't you believe in Nigeria anymore?
Ans: In 1985 when I left the job of Rector in Nigeria, I did so to return to a profession that I spent most of my life preparing for, that is mechanical engineering. I was dissatisfied with the kind of elitism that created a wall between products of universities and those of polytechnics in Nigeria, and I was glad that as Rector, I had opportunity to make a case for products of both institutions to have respect for each other as equals and as having something valuable to give to the country. While I was a Visiting Associate Professor here in the USA I attended an interview in 1986 in Washington, D. C., for position in Nigeria's Universities, but I never got promised response, let alone an offer of appointment from any of the universities. It was providential that Mississippi State University took a chance on me and gave me a job at a time I was intent on getting back to engineering. Reminds me of what Jesus said on a few occasions, “Only in his hometown and in his own house is a prophet without honor.”
I believe that being in the USA helps me to be more helpful to Nigeria than I would have been if I had been in a Nigerian University all these years. I was able to spend 6 months in 2004 with Bowen University, Iwo, on a Fulbright Research Award. Some of the students that worked with me are now in the Solar Energy business. I have maintained contact with Bowen University and some other institutions including University of Ilorin, University of Lagos, the Federal Polytechnic, Bida, Kwara Polytechnic, Ilorin, in productive ways. During my most recent visit to Nigeria in May this year, I got a carpenter in Ilorin to construct a solar fish dryer cabinet for me and I left the unit with the Dean of Engineering at University of Ilorin for further experimenting with the idea. A Lecturer in the Fisheries Department expressed interest in the project. I also worked on trying to secure collaboration and partnering between institutions in Nigeria and counterparts in the USA, and one of these days we will succeed.
5. Can you develop solar assisted Air Conditioners, TV, Deep freezers and other home appliances?
Ans: In 1983, the Federal Government awarded contract for development of solar assisted air conditioner to the Federal Polytechnic, Bida. The most attractive option is to use an absorption refrigeration system that uses solar heat rather than electricity. You remember the Electrolux refrigerator that was used in rural areas that did not have regular supply of electricity. We used kerosene heaters to produce cooling in the refrigerator. While I welcomed the contract award in 1983, I felt helpless to pursue the research in Nigeria because of grossly inadequate infrastructure for meaningful research and development (R & D) effort. I got to the USA in August 2004, and within a couple of weeks I was able to access technical data base for the research. Back to Nigeria, I had a hard time figuring out where to obtain ammonia to brew an ammonia-water-hydrogen system. This was one more reason to relocate.
Solar assisted air conditioning is one of the most rational applications of solar energy. In Nigeria, air conditioning means keeping a space cool. Who needs air conditioning during the harmattan season when it is chilly and cold? Cooling is needed during the hot weather, and coincidentally that is when there is plenty of sunshine to make a solar air conditioner efficient and effective. This is one problem that is in phase with the solution. I hope to get back to research of this nature in the years ahead. I wish I had a benefactor to take care of my bills, and feed me, and then task me with developing a solar assisted air conditioner that works and is affordable for the average Nigerian.
Solar powered freezers have been developed and are in the market. I have one in my house here in the USA and it is operated entirely from a 100 Watt solar panel with a 55 Ah deep cycle battery. It has been working since August last year, even on days when we had a bit of snow for a day or two. I have friends and family in Nigeria that I helped acquire the same type of unit, and they have expressed total satisfaction with the product.
With the help of individuals in Nigeria we have set up comprehensive solar energy systems in homes that provide uninterrupted lighting (including security outdoor light), power to operate TVs, fans, laptops and printers, and other low-power appliances. I do not recommend using solar electricity to operate pressing irons, nor do I recommend it for water heater units or electric cookers. Both of these require kW of power. For pressing irons, wait until PHCN shows up. For hot water, use gas/kerosene/fire wood to heat water, or else, wait for us to include solar water heaters on our products list. That will come sooner than later.
6. Can you tell us the process of making this solar energy work? And what is going to happen if there is seizure of ultraviolet radiation (heat of the sun)?
Ans: Solar energy is a form of electromagnetic radiation. It travels through space at the speed of light. The solar radiation that flows to the planet Earth in 1 hour is as much energy as the whole world uses in a year. Approximately three weeks of solar radiation reaching the earth is more than the sum total of all known capital non-renewable energy resources on Earth.
Solar radiation reaches the Earth as low intensity dispersed energy form. If it were more intense, we will all be roasting in its heat. The good Lord saved us from all that, and placed the Sun in the right place so it gives warmth to the Earth and provides all the Energy-manna we need for survival, including agriculture and the water cycle. We use roofs to create shade inside our homes, but place a few solar panels on the roof and you have free supply of electricity to do many things in the house. A solar panel comprises solar cells that convert energy of the Sun to flow of electricity. The output of these panels typically varies from 15 V dc to 19 V dc and higher. You need a battery charge controller that serves as a kind of voltage regulator for charging batteries that store the energy for later use. The automobile battery is a poor choice for solar applications. I knew a vendor that sold batteries used for trailers for solar application thinking that a battery that is good for a huge truck can surely work wonders for the home. Automobile batteries are designed to deliver huge current for starting an engine. The plates of those batteries are thin so they can perform very well. They do not store energy efficiently, and battery cells are easily damaged if discharged beyond certain limits. The batteries that are appropriate in solar applications are those referred to as deep cycle or marine batteries. They are a lot more robust, and they operate with much thicker plates than those used in automobile batteries. They do not deliver as much cranking amps as automobile batteries, but they do energy storage much more efficiently. Deep discharge of deep cycle batteries is less critical than doing that to automobile batteries.
Energy storage in a battery is much like storing water in a water tank near ground level. You can fill up your bucket from a water tank near ground level. Likewise you can operate dc devices (like radio, dc fans, dc LED light bulbs, even solar freezers) straight from the battery. If you need water pressure for a shower, for example, or to flush a toilet, you must pump the water to a high level tank and draw water from the elevated tank. The same with operating high voltage ac appliances from batteries; you use inverters (like pumps) to convert 12 V dc voltage of a battery to 220 V ac supply needed for operating the appliances (such as TV, ac fans, ac refrigerators, etc.) Both water systems and energy systems obey a conservation law. If you have small amount of water stored in your tank that is all you have; you cannot later use more water than what you previously managed to put in the tank. A law of thermodynamics likewise decrees that you do not have more energy than what you stored in the batteries in the first place. So the goal is to have enough batteries, and store all the energy you can so as to be able to meet all your electrical energy needs in a 24-hour cycle.
The Sun's energy is good for a host of thermal applications other than producing electricity. You can use it for heating and cooling, cooking and drying, producing clean water from brackish water, etc.
The ultraviolet component of solar radiation is relatively small, and is absorbed largely in the ozone layer of the Earth's atmosphere. Depletion of this layer by man-made chemical substances endangers the health of humans. Use of solar energy in and of itself poses no health hazard to humans.
7. Is solar energy better off and more cost effective than inverter and generating sets, if yes, how?
Ans: There is confusion about what an inverter is. An inverter is a device that changes direct current (dc) from a bank of batteries to alternating current (ac) that several appliances need. Battery voltage is typically 12 V dc, whereas the ac supply in Nigeria is around 220 V ac. The opposite of an inverter is a battery charger, which charges a 12 V dc battery from a 220 V ac supply. Some so-called inverters actually have both an inverter and a battery charger. I favour such combination because whenever PHCN supply is available, batteries get charged, and to a significant extent, normal operations can be maintained for a much longer period than otherwise. What happens when PHCN supply is on a long vacation? My Auntie in Ibadan complained they did not have grid electricity for nearly a week. The only thing she had going was solar electricity from the 200 W solar panel installation at the house. Couple solar with the UPS feature of a battery charger and you have a more sustainable system for use in the home.
Those generating sets are very poor substitutes for what I have proposed for the following reasons:
1. Current cost of fuel actually makes electricity generated with a household generator at least 5 times as expensive as that from PHCN. For every 1000 kWh of electricity produced by a generator, you will save at least N60, 000 in fuel cost alone by employing a solar system.
2. Management of power from a generator is truly a burden. If the lights are out in the middle of the night, you have to get up to turn the generator on, and to turn it off when power returns. It is very wasteful to have to turn on the generator just to have lights in the toilet/passage way/room, all of which do not amount to a large amount of energy.
3. There is significant maintenance cost associated with generators, in addition to the fact that they degrade in performance with time.
4. Management of fuel supply for generators is hectic and very cumbersome. Also, the pollution associated with their operation is both deadly and a nuisance. The emissions often include carbon monoxide, a silent killer.

8. We know there are many health implications on the use of generating sets, inverter etc; is there any health implications in the use of solar energy?
Ans: Solar energy is clean and safe. Nearly 50% of the sun's energy falls in the visible spectrum and is what makes us see so well during the day. Another 40% or so is in the infrared region that produces heating effect and makes us warm. About 11% is in the ultraviolet region, and this is a portion of solar radiation that can pose health hazards to humans. Providentially, much of this is absorbed in the ozone layer, and that is why human interventions that result in depletion of this layer are really bad for humanity. Solar energy in the home is safe, but we must insist on electrical wiring being done safely and correctly so we don't have fires caused by electrical faults. Also, if wet cell batteries are used, normal battery care must be observed, and any danger from noxious gas emissions must be avoided.
Some of the benefits of solar systems include:
1. You do not have to get up at night to operate the system for basic needs such as lighting or operating a fan or TV.
2. The UPS – Solar Combo guarantees uninterrupted supply for the facilities that the system is designed to operate.
3. You save a lot of money because once your solar system is installed; the solar energy inflow is free energy.
9. As a stakeholder in the academic milieu what can you identify as setback(s) in the Nigeria's educational sector?
Ans: Nearly 50 years after gaining independence from the UK, Nigeria's educational sector has remained quite unsettled. If the students do not strike, the academicians will, or the junior staff will! I remember a President of the USA challenging his fellow Americans with the charge, “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country instead.” We need such a rallying call in Nigeria today. The writer of Ecclesiastes in the Bible has this to say, “Whoever loves money never has money enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with his income…” Elsewhere, the Apostle Paul writes, “godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that…. The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.”
Many Professors in Nigeria currently earn over N100, 000 per month. Some people with ND or NCE earn less than N5, 000 a month. If anyone should go on strike over pay, not the professors in a country with so many people who cannot afford basic necessities of life.
Respect for other humans and regard for sanctity of life appear to be vanishing on our campuses. Students kill each other for the flimsiest of excuses.
Are the facilities adequate in our educational institutions? Far from it! When I was Rector of a polytechnic, it did not take long to observe that when you divert money for equipment to students' feeding (to avoid crises), you end up short changing the students. They come to school to learn and be educated. The simplest solution was to hand over catering to independent caterers that could do a much better job than institutions. In our case, there was much vested interest, people who profited from the food tendering process resisted and as a result it took time and a bit of student unrest to make the change. Happily, we quickly moved beyond that and settled into the real business of the institution.
10. Can you train our young Nigerians who do not have University education to make a living out of this solar energy initiative?
Ans: Sure! As recently as May this year, I worked with a carpenter in Ilorin on the construction of a solar fish dryer cabinet. He did an excellent job even when I was unable to stay with him while he worked on the project. Much of the work on solar energy installations can be successfully done with electricians, plumbers, carpenters (without university education) all contributing their skills as needed.
11. Have you ever engage Nigeria government on any discussions on how to explore solar energy in Nigeria as a remedy to our energy quagmire?
Ans: I happen to know several individuals in Government in Nigeria, but I never abuse that privilege. For example, I do not know His Excellency, President Yar'Adua personally, but he attended Government College, Keffi, (North-Central, Nigeria) years after I graduated from the School. If I had been in Keffi when he entered the school, he could have been my fag as was the practice in those days!
I feel the best contribution any of us can make is to help Government whenever called upon to do so, and to do so in a responsible manner. While I was in Nigeria, I took part in at least two Energy Policy forums that the Federal Government convened on energy. I am amazed at the brilliance of policy advice that various individuals and bodies have made to Government on energy issues. I am glad if and when I have opportunity to be a part of that.
12. Can you really partner with private individuals or corporate bodies in making all these major breakthroughs of yours actionable, and how can you be reached in this regard?
Ans: I surely would love to partner with others on easing the energy crunch that makes life so unbearable to so many Nigerians but we must do so on mutually acceptable terms. For example, a couple of years ago, a friend of mine who lives in Dallas, Texas, joined me and two solar energy companies in Nigeria in submitting proposals to the World Bank in response to Lighting Africa Initiative. I serve as Consultant to both solar energy companies. At least one of them has paid me in the past for consulting. The other often pleaded “we are struggling sir”! The reality that we all face is that there is no free lunch. I will gladly share what I know with anyone who wants to know what I know, but remember I too have bills to pay, and a worker is entitled to his wages. I read a joke on the internet. A barber gave free haircut to a priest, then a policeman, then a Nigerian business man. The priest came back with books etc. to show his gratitude, while the policeman brought donuts to the barber. Guess what, the Nigerian businessman brought eleven or so other Nigerians for free haircut! The good book says, “It is more blesse d to give than to receive.” We need to change our mind set and replace a “grabbing” mindset with a “giving” spirit.
13. If you really want to go into full scale solar energy installations in Nigeria don't you think you will have problems in importing some of the materials that could be required for the task, or what do you think?
Ans: The good news is that much of the materials needed for solar energy installations can be procured locally. Solar thermal applications, for example, require such items like wood, glass, mirrors, nails, and hinges, virtually all of which are available locally. On the other hand, key items needed in solar electricity generation must be imported from other countries. Interestingly, here in the USA, the situation is not very different. The solar panels I buy here are imported mostly from Europe (Germany, for example) and China. Deep cycle batteries are frequently from China. A major retailer in the USA buys most of its wares from China. We in Nigeria are not shy about buying cars, TVs, and other things that make life more comfortable from all over the world, so why should solar gadgets be an exception? I really wish Government will help here because for once we can import products that have a potential to ease the burden of inadequate energy supply that thus far has proved to be intractable and damaging to the quality of life in the country. I pray for policies that facilitate such imports for the good of the country.
14. What is your advice for Nigeria especially governments at all level, and what do you expect them to hope for in the energy sector?
Ans: History teaches us that no one learns anything from history, so said somebody! Why don't we learn from the experiences of other nations? If I may borrow a saying that President Obama used during his campaign for the Presidency of the United States, “To keep doing the same thing and yet expect a different outcome is insanity!” The public is mistaken in thinking that Government can do it all. If you have a plumbing job in the house you go to a plumber. If you are hungry, you look for a caterer in a bukateria or a fast food place depending on how much money you have. If you are sick, you look for the Doctor. I think the word I am looking for is privatization.
Here in the USA, Government is not in the electricity generating business. Even the UK today has privatized much of the electricity generating business. The water supply in a subdivision I once lived in was entirely private. Government in Nigeria gets involved and bogged down trying to do things they are ill-equipped to do well. It is time for well-meaning people in Government to focus on governing and let those equipped to do the work get on with responding to the challenges facing the nation. Government has responsibility for policy and safeguarding of public safety and orderliness. There is a role for agencies like ECN (the Energy Commission of Nigeria), but as experience has shown in Nigeria from the other ECN (Electricity Corporation of Nigeria) to NEPA (Never Expect Power At all) to PHCN (Problem Has Changed Name) – the characterizations not mine – Nigeria is still a long way from generating anywhere close to the electric power needed. Government agencies are simply not equipped for the task assigned. Government should find out best practices elsewhere, and then promote forging of private/public partnerships that will deliver the desired results. Thus far, several Government initiatives have often turned out to be dead ends, unfortunately.
This leads me to a second piece of advice for Government. Accountability is the word. Contracts have been awarded with hardly any results to show. From the Governor down to the labourer, everyone must be held accountable. The labourer who does not clear the grounds he is assigned should only be paid for what he did. The Governor who pays contractors for job not done according to the terms of the contract should be impeached and removed. People may not like this kind of talk, but equality before the law must be the core value of a civilized society.
How do we connect the dots? The energy crisis in Nigeria today calls for unusual measures. The Obasanjo 1 regime used to work with “think tanks”, but now we need “think, act and deliver tanks”. How about identifying brilliant minds in the country and putting them to work for the country? No fanfare, but give them a free hand and the means to succeed. Provide for their bread and butter needs, and hold them accountable. Be specific about goals, and judge them by their success in achieving the goals set. I am impressed that faced with challenge from Russia in the 1950s, the USA not only caught up in a hurry in the space arena but became the only country to send man safely to the Moon and back home. I wonder how they did it!
For more information about Professor George Adebiyi kindly visit:http://www.me.msstate.edu/people/Faculty/Adebiyi/adebiyi.html#research; or mail him at:george_adebiyi@yahoo.com"

This tribute was added by Sola Oduko on 19th October 2016

"This internet interview serves as Prof George Adebiyi's Autobiography as at 2009

/
'Sola Oduko


                           PROF GEORGE ADEBISI ADEBIYI

Nigeria | 4 July 2009 10:51 CET
2  Comments
Adebiyi avails self as solution to Nigeria’s energy crunch
Source: Emmanuel Ajibulu - modernghana.com
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Professor George Adebiyi
…Says he attended same college with President Yar'Adua
Professor George Adebiyi is a seasoned University doyen in Mississippi State University (USA); his research interests largely focus on Solar/Renewable Energy/Fuel Cell applications, Mathematical modelling of advanced energy systems including Thermal Regenerators (such as Packed Bed Storage Systems utilizing Phase-Change Materials), Heat and Mass Transfer Regenerators (such as Desiccant Dehumidifiers, Crop Dryers). Others are: Formulations for the Thermodynamic Properties of Substances and Development of Algorithms for use in Computer Property Codes, Computer-Aided Thermodynamic Analysis and Evaluation of Thermal Systems, Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer Applications in Systems Design and Analysis, Piping networks system design, to mention a few.
In an interactive online (electronic) parley with Emmanuel Ajibulu (Modernghana representative in Nigeria), the Professor responded to a number of issues that can bring back hope to Nigeria's energy crunch. The interaction was quite participatory and interesting as the energy guru injects some sense of humour to the question and answer session.
Excerpt:

1. Can I meet you sir?

Ans: I was born in Nigeria, a native of Igosun in Kwara State. My early education began in Ejigbo. Later, I attended Senior Primary School at Laminga (midway between Keffi and Nassarawa) from 1955 to 1956, and Senior Primary School, Bauchi (1957 to 1958). I attended Government College, Keffi (1959 to 1963), and King's College, Lagos (1964 to 1965) for the HSC. I studied Mechanical Engineering at the University of Manchester, Manchester, England, and graduated with a 1st Class Hons. degree in 1969. I worked for a year (1969 to 1970) as a Research Associate at the Central Electricity Research Laboratories in Leatherhead and returned to the University of Manchester for the Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering. I completed my Ph.D. in December 1972, although the award of the degree was dated March 1973. From January 1973 to December 1973 I worked with Shell in Lagos. I was appointed a Lecturer at the University of Lagos and worked there from December 1973 to July 1975. My next appointment was with now Kwara Polytechnic, Ilorin (July 1975 to 1979). At Ilorin I was beneficiary of a Unesco Fellowship to Huddersfield Polytechnic where I earned an Advanced Diplo ma in Further Education (a University of Leeds Award) in 1977. I later served as Director of the School of Technology from 1978 to 1979. In July 1979, I assumed duty as Rector (then Principal) of the Federal Polytechnic, Bida. I continued there as Rector until 1985. Around 1983, we established a Solar Energy Research Centre at the Polytechnic. The Centre continues to provide a focus for students' projects as well as research by Lecturers in the area of solar energy applications. In 1984, I was away from the Federal Polytechnic on sabbatical leave that gave me the first opportunity to work in the U.S.A. The time was spent at Rust College, Holly Springs in Mississippi. Rust College is a Liberal Arts College and is a Private University. I was a Visiting Professor of Physics. On my return to Nigeria I spent 3 months (May to July 1985) with the Solar Energy Centre of the then University of Sokoto, Sokoto. In August 1985, I returned to the U.S.A. this time to the Mississippi State University as a Visiting Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. I was promoted to full Professor with tenure in 1991. I co-authored a Classical Thermodynamics textbook with a colleague (Dr. Lynn D. Russell) in 1993. The book was translated to Spanish and is currently in print.
My father (now deceased) was an ordained Baptist Reverend who as far back as 1955 began a career as an Educationist and served in several civil service positions in the former Northern Region of Nigeria. My mother (also deceased) was the first woman to complete Standard 6 in Ilorin province in the 1930's, and she served until her death in 1983 as Church Organist everywhere we lived. Although I was born into a Christian family, it was not until 1960 that I got saved and became a Christian. I have often served as Church Pianist/Organist in Churches that I belong to. I currently play the piano at a Church in Columbus, Mississippi, which has a Missionary Pastor from Nigeria.
2. Can you share with the world what you think is causing persistent power failure in Nigeria?
Ans: I always dramatize the seriousness of power failure in much of Africa by pointing to a NASA picture of the Earth at night. (See the following web site, for example:http://www.novaspace.com/POSTERS/PHOTO/EBN.html ) Virtually all the continents are lit except Africa!
Let me now share some facts and figures that explain why Nigeria experiences vexing and perennial power failure. Nigeria currently has a population of around 140 million. In a recent interview, Nigeria's President announced that total electric generating capacity in the country was effectively below 3 GW. If you divide this by the population you will find that there is only about 20 W per person. Increasing generating capacity to 5 GW will raise this to a little over 35 W per person. The household bulbs we use are rated 25 W, 40 W, 60 W, or even 100 W. The 2-ft fluorescent lights consume around 20 W powers. Thus, if all the electricity generated is used exclusively in homes (with nothing for industries, businesses and commercial centres), there is just enough to light one bulb for every Nigerian. In actual fact, typically 50% of grid electricity is consumed in homes, while the commercial and industrial sectors account for about 25% each. Nigeria still has ways to go to generate at the 5 GW level. The Kainji Dam can only provide 960 MW (less than 1 GW). Not all the turbine units are in operation because water level in the reservoir is often low for a multitude of reasons including drought. The power from the dam is only about 500 MW to 600 MW most of the time. Also, there is an agreement that requires much of this power to be delivered to Niger Republic. This is necessary to avoid a situation where Niger Republic diverts much of river Niger to take care of its own needs for water power. Thus, on average less than 3 kWh of electricity can be supplied per household per day in Nigeria for the forseeable future. This assumes that all electricity generated is used entirely in houses and residences. Let us make a few comparisons. South Africa with a population of a little over 44 million has electric generating capacity of 30 GW. This translates to an annual per capita consumption of electricity of 4500 kWh. For Nigeria, the annual per capita consumption of electricity is estimated at between about 100 kWh and 135 kWh. Here in the U.S.A. the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) provides electric power to about 8 million people. TVA's generating capacity is currently 33 GW, and the average daily electrical energy sold per household in 2006 in Mississippi alone was 44 kWh per household per day. A daily average TVA sale to commercial and industrial customers for the same period was 220 kWh per customer. Ironically, during the summer months in Mississippi and other states in the TVA region, the weather is so hot that a ir conditioners have to run “full throttle”, and in July especially, TVA often cautions its customers to slow down on the use of air conditioners or else risk power loss.
Why is there persistent power failure in Nigeria? The answer is simply that supply is way below demand; the Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN) is generating less than 2% of the power needed (if the TVA, or even South Africa, record is taken as standard). In addition, there are human factors that make the power situation in Nigeria a lot worse. A source recently indicated that over 40% of generated electricity is lost. In recent years, thieves have stolen transmission line wires (only to resell to NEPA/PHCN), causing serious disruption to electricity supply. Even transformers have been stolen and resold. Pipelines supplying fuel to power stations have been sabotaged and vandalized. If fuel does not get to a power station, no power can be generated. There are lots of illegal power connections. As a result, there is shortfall in revenue that could be applied to improving electricity supply in the country. All these compound the problems and frustrate any effort being made to solve the crisis.
3. Why is there persistent power failure in Nigeria?
Ans: Conventional power generation uses fossil fuels (coal, gas, and oil), which are non-renewable and are being used up very rapidly. Fossil fuels take millions of years to form, and with heightened global demand they may be exhausted a lot sooner than later. The future of electrical power generation from fossil fuel combustion is threatened by escalating fuel prices and by adverse environmental consequences of large scale combustion of carbon-rich fuels. Combustion of these fuels unleashes intolerable amounts of carbon dioxide to the environment contributing to turning the Earth's atmosphere to a greenhouse with the harmful effect of producing global warming. In this regard, coal-fired plants, while offering electricity on the cheap is the worst culprit, and power utilities that propose these plants are increasingly incurring enormous (capital) costs in assuring adequate emissions control and carbon dioxide sequestration to minimize the pollution they unleash on the environment. Natural gas (mostly methane) also adds significant amounts of carbon dioxide to the environment. Meeting these challenges adds significant costs to electricity production from the use of the non-renewable primary energy resources. In other words, there is every indication that electricity production from the mix of conventional fossil fuels will occ ur in the future at increasing cost to consumers than the current levels. Nigeria is blessed with an abundance of renewable energy both as direct solar energy and indirect solar energy. Indirect solar energy includes water power in the form of hydroelectric power, wind power, bio-fuels derived from corn and other plants, biomass, and biogas from garbage and other biological wastes. Solar energy can be exploited directly in thermal applications (crop drying, water heating, distillation, solar cooking, refrigeration and air conditioning, thermal power generation) and in solar electricity production using photovoltaic converters.
Solar/Renewable energy is attractive principally because it is manna-like. It is a renewable energy resource. It is a widely distributed form of energy. In other words, it is available where needed; this eliminates the need for long transmission lines that could be easily disrupted by robbers and saboteurs. It is free. Only the energy converters cost money, and the investment needed is largely capital. Maintenance cost is generally minimal. It is a non-polluting form of energy. (As indicated already, fossil fuels are known to generate a lot of greenhouse gases that produce global warming and threaten the future of the planet. Solar energy is clean and safe to use. Electric generators pollute with the noxious emissions and the noise. Solar converters provide electricity without emissions and without noise.)
Attractive as solar energy is, there are challenges to be met in its exploitation: Solar insolation levels on the Earth's surface are generally low, and, therefore, collectors and solar converters must have large surface areas to meet even relatively low energy demand applications. For many locations in Nigeria, the amount of solar energy inflow exceeds 5 to 6 kWh per m2 per day, which is a typical threshold value needed for viable solar energy applications. Current technologies for solar cell production are energy intensive. Typical energy pay back periods are on the order of 6 to 11 years. New technologies are emerging, however, that significantly cut manufacturing costs and as a result make solar converters increasingly more affordable. Solar energy flow to the Earth occurs on a diurnal cycle. This intermittency imposes an energy storage requirement, which adds to the capital cost and reduces overall system efficiency. (Storage systems have regeneration efficiencies that can be as low as about 60% for thermal storage systems and as high as about 80% to 90% for battery storage.)
Can solar energy rescue Nigeria from its current energy crises? The honest answer is that solar energy alone cannot be the answer, but it can be a significant part of solving the problem. Let me begin by sharing some of the experiences of other countries: Solar water heating is saving on use of non-renewable energy in many parts of the world. An article by John Perlin (http://www.californiasolarcenter.org/history_solarthermal.html ) recalls the widely known fact that Israel requires its inhabitants to heat their water with the sun. “Today, more than 90% of Israeli households own solar water heaters.” California, Florida, and several states in the United States use solar water heaters extensively. The United States Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria, uses solar water heaters to enable self-sufficiency and lower use of fossil-fuels. Hot water is available even during routine black-outs. Solar thermal power stations are being built all around the world. A Wikipedia listing on this is indeed informative (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_solar_thermal_power_stations ). These include: An 11 megawatt PS10 solar power tower in Spain that produces electricity from the sun using 624 large movable mirrors called heliostats. Three hundred and fifty four (354) MW Solar Energy Generating Systems (SEGS) power plant in California, U.S.A. World Bank financed integrated solar thermal/combined-cycle gas-turbine power plants in Egypt, Mexico, and Morocco. Significant developments in the area of photovoltaics will foster widespread solar electricity generation in the very near future. For example, solar shingles are now available in the market place that can make solar electricity available to houses without using extra space other than the roof. Concentrating photovoltaic systems are being developed with a potential for increasing solar cell efficiencies to over 40%. California provides an example of how to tackle energy crises using a mix of approaches. California was forced to implement rolling black outs a few years ago because there was not sufficient power generated to meet the demand. Here is a summary of some measures adopted since that time to address the bigger issue of holding down power demand: Lighting accounted for an estimated 37% of electricity use per California household in 2006. Energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) use about a quarter as much electricity as incandescent light bulbs, and the CFLs last several times as long as the regular bulbs. The utilities heavily subsidized the CFL industry and brought down cost of CFLs from $5 to $10 dollars in 1999 to a mere 25 to 50 cents in the marketplace.
In summary, solar energy can complement other forms of energy available in Nigeria today. In the short- and medium-term, the use of solar energy ought to be focused on the following applications:
(1) Thermal applications such as heating and cooling, crop and food drying, cooking;
(2) Lighting applications that use energy-efficient CFL and LED light fixtures;
(3) Powering of low wattage electrical appliances such as energy-efficient TVs, fans, refrigerators and freezers, water pumps. Appliances like air conditioners are typically rated in the kilowatt range, and while they can be powered using solar electricity, the cost will be inevitably high.
Substituting solar energy for conventional energy in the home will provide succor for many households while making more of grid electricity available to industries and commercial units.
Can an individual solve Nigeria's energy crises? I wish! I am reminded of the proverbial rooster that claims credit for making the sun rise by its crowing! The magnitude of the problem calls for making prudent use of Nigeria's human talent. I am impressed at the tremendous contributions that Sons and Daughters of Nigeria have made, and continue to make the world over. Some have confidently asserted that if you go to any part of the world and you do not find a few Nigerians there, something must be wrong with that place. Frankly, I think this is an overstatement of what is anecdotally true.
We need to recapture a vision of great things that can be accomplished when we work together. There is currently a lot of excitement and interest everywhere (in Nigeria and other parts of the world) about solar energy, and I am excited that several companies now exist in Nigeria “doing solar.” I fear, however, that a lot of dupes seize on the public excitement to defraud unsuspecting customers. Someone needs to educate the public to discriminate between the genuine thing and what may be counterfeit. Government has a role to ensure safety and probity in the public arena.
I welcome State Governments that have embraced solar projects like solar street lighting. They should show transparency on such projects. How much do they cost? How good are they? It is a shame if the solar street lights fail prematurely. It is just as bad to pay a lot more than is necessary for such projects.

4. Why are you lecturing in Mississippi University in USA? Why not in a Nigerian University, or don't you believe in Nigeria anymore?
Ans: In 1985 when I left the job of Rector in Nigeria, I did so to return to a profession that I spent most of my life preparing for, that is mechanical engineering. I was dissatisfied with the kind of elitism that created a wall between products of universities and those of polytechnics in Nigeria, and I was glad that as Rector, I had opportunity to make a case for products of both institutions to have respect for each other as equals and as having something valuable to give to the country. While I was a Visiting Associate Professor here in the USA I attended an interview in 1986 in Washington, D. C., for position in Nigeria's Universities, but I never got promised response, let alone an offer of appointment from any of the universities. It was providential that Mississippi State University took a chance on me and gave me a job at a time I was intent on getting back to engineering. Reminds me of what Jesus said on a few occasions, “Only in his hometown and in his own house is a prophet without honor.”
I believe that being in the USA helps me to be more helpful to Nigeria than I would have been if I had been in a Nigerian University all these years. I was able to spend 6 months in 2004 with Bowen University, Iwo, on a Fulbright Research Award. Some of the students that worked with me are now in the Solar Energy business. I have maintained contact with Bowen University and some other institutions including University of Ilorin, University of Lagos, the Federal Polytechnic, Bida, Kwara Polytechnic, Ilorin, in productive ways. During my most recent visit to Nigeria in May this year, I got a carpenter in Ilorin to construct a solar fish dryer cabinet for me and I left the unit with the Dean of Engineering at University of Ilorin for further experimenting with the idea. A Lecturer in the Fisheries Department expressed interest in the project. I also worked on trying to secure collaboration and partnering between institutions in Nigeria and counterparts in the USA, and one of these days we will succeed.
5. Can you develop solar assisted Air Conditioners, TV, Deep freezers and other home appliances?
Ans: In 1983, the Federal Government awarded contract for development of solar assisted air conditioner to the Federal Polytechnic, Bida. The most attractive option is to use an absorption refrigeration system that uses solar heat rather than electricity. You remember the Electrolux refrigerator that was used in rural areas that did not have regular supply of electricity. We used kerosene heaters to produce cooling in the refrigerator. While I welcomed the contract award in 1983, I felt helpless to pursue the research in Nigeria because of grossly inadequate infrastructure for meaningful research and development (R & D) effort. I got to the USA in August 2004, and within a couple of weeks I was able to access technical data base for the research. Back to Nigeria, I had a hard time figuring out where to obtain ammonia to brew an ammonia-water-hydrogen system. This was one more reason to relocate.
Solar assisted air conditioning is one of the most rational applications of solar energy. In Nigeria, air conditioning means keeping a space cool. Who needs air conditioning during the harmattan season when it is chilly and cold? Cooling is needed during the hot weather, and coincidentally that is when there is plenty of sunshine to make a solar air conditioner efficient and effective. This is one problem that is in phase with the solution. I hope to get back to research of this nature in the years ahead. I wish I had a benefactor to take care of my bills, and feed me, and then task me with developing a solar assisted air conditioner that works and is affordable for the average Nigerian.
Solar powered freezers have been developed and are in the market. I have one in my house here in the USA and it is operated entirely from a 100 Watt solar panel with a 55 Ah deep cycle battery. It has been working since August last year, even on days when we had a bit of snow for a day or two. I have friends and family in Nigeria that I helped acquire the same type of unit, and they have expressed total satisfaction with the product.
With the help of individuals in Nigeria we have set up comprehensive solar energy systems in homes that provide uninterrupted lighting (including security outdoor light), power to operate TVs, fans, laptops and printers, and other low-power appliances. I do not recommend using solar electricity to operate pressing irons, nor do I recommend it for water heater units or electric cookers. Both of these require kW of power. For pressing irons, wait until PHCN shows up. For hot water, use gas/kerosene/fire wood to heat water, or else, wait for us to include solar water heaters on our products list. That will come sooner than later.
6. Can you tell us the process of making this solar energy work? And what is going to happen if there is seizure of ultraviolet radiation (heat of the sun)?
Ans: Solar energy is a form of electromagnetic radiation. It travels through space at the speed of light. The solar radiation that flows to the planet Earth in 1 hour is as much energy as the whole world uses in a year. Approximately three weeks of solar radiation reaching the earth is more than the sum total of all known capital non-renewable energy resources on Earth.
Solar radiation reaches the Earth as low intensity dispersed energy form. If it were more intense, we will all be roasting in its heat. The good Lord saved us from all that, and placed the Sun in the right place so it gives warmth to the Earth and provides all the Energy-manna we need for survival, including agriculture and the water cycle. We use roofs to create shade inside our homes, but place a few solar panels on the roof and you have free supply of electricity to do many things in the house. A solar panel comprises solar cells that convert energy of the Sun to flow of electricity. The output of these panels typically varies from 15 V dc to 19 V dc and higher. You need a battery charge controller that serves as a kind of voltage regulator for charging batteries that store the energy for later use. The automobile battery is a poor choice for solar applications. I knew a vendor that sold batteries used for trailers for solar application thinking that a battery that is good for a huge truck can surely work wonders for the home. Automobile batteries are designed to deliver huge current for starting an engine. The plates of those batteries are thin so they can perform very well. They do not store energy efficiently, and battery cells are easily damaged if discharged beyond certain limits. The batteries that are appropriate in solar applications are those referred to as deep cycle or marine batteries. They are a lot more robust, and they operate with much thicker plates than those used in automobile batteries. They do not deliver as much cranking amps as automobile batteries, but they do energy storage much more efficiently. Deep discharge of deep cycle batteries is less critical than doing that to automobile batteries.
Energy storage in a battery is much like storing water in a water tank near ground level. You can fill up your bucket from a water tank near ground level. Likewise you can operate dc devices (like radio, dc fans, dc LED light bulbs, even solar freezers) straight from the battery. If you need water pressure for a shower, for example, or to flush a toilet, you must pump the water to a high level tank and draw water from the elevated tank. The same with operating high voltage ac appliances from batteries; you use inverters (like pumps) to convert 12 V dc voltage of a battery to 220 V ac supply needed for operating the appliances (such as TV, ac fans, ac refrigerators, etc.) Both water systems and energy systems obey a conservation law. If you have small amount of water stored in your tank that is all you have; you cannot later use more water than what you previously managed to put in the tank. A law of thermodynamics likewise decrees that you do not have more energy than what you stored in the batteries in the first place. So the goal is to have enough batteries, and store all the energy you can so as to be able to meet all your electrical energy needs in a 24-hour cycle.
The Sun's energy is good for a host of thermal applications other than producing electricity. You can use it for heating and cooling, cooking and drying, producing clean water from brackish water, etc.
The ultraviolet component of solar radiation is relatively small, and is absorbed largely in the ozone layer of the Earth's atmosphere. Depletion of this layer by man-made chemical substances endangers the health of humans. Use of solar energy in and of itself poses no health hazard to humans.
7. Is solar energy better off and more cost effective than inverter and generating sets, if yes, how?
Ans: There is confusion about what an inverter is. An inverter is a device that changes direct current (dc) from a bank of batteries to alternating current (ac) that several appliances need. Battery voltage is typically 12 V dc, whereas the ac supply in Nigeria is around 220 V ac. The opposite of an inverter is a battery charger, which charges a 12 V dc battery from a 220 V ac supply. Some so-called inverters actually have both an inverter and a battery charger. I favour such combination because whenever PHCN supply is available, batteries get charged, and to a significant extent, normal operations can be maintained for a much longer period than otherwise. What happens when PHCN supply is on a long vacation? My Auntie in Ibadan complained they did not have grid electricity for nearly a week. The only thing she had going was solar electricity from the 200 W solar panel installation at the house. Couple solar with the UPS feature of a battery charger and you have a more sustainable system for use in the home.
Those generating sets are very poor substitutes for what I have proposed for the following reasons:
1. Current cost of fuel actually makes electricity generated with a household generator at least 5 times as expensive as that from PHCN. For every 1000 kWh of electricity produced by a generator, you will save at least N60, 000 in fuel cost alone by employing a solar system.
2. Management of power from a generator is truly a burden. If the lights are out in the middle of the night, you have to get up to turn the generator on, and to turn it off when power returns. It is very wasteful to have to turn on the generator just to have lights in the toilet/passage way/room, all of which do not amount to a large amount of energy.
3. There is significant maintenance cost associated with generators, in addition to the fact that they degrade in performance with time.
4. Management of fuel supply for generators is hectic and very cumbersome. Also, the pollution associated with their operation is both deadly and a nuisance. The emissions often include carbon monoxide, a silent killer.

8. We know there are many health implications on the use of generating sets, inverter etc; is there any health implications in the use of solar energy?
Ans: Solar energy is clean and safe. Nearly 50% of the sun's energy falls in the visible spectrum and is what makes us see so well during the day. Another 40% or so is in the infrared region that produces heating effect and makes us warm. About 11% is in the ultraviolet region, and this is a portion of solar radiation that can pose health hazards to humans. Providentially, much of this is absorbed in the ozone layer, and that is why human interventions that result in depletion of this layer are really bad for humanity. Solar energy in the home is safe, but we must insist on electrical wiring being done safely and correctly so we don't have fires caused by electrical faults. Also, if wet cell batteries are used, normal battery care must be observed, and any danger from noxious gas emissions must be avoided.
Some of the benefits of solar systems include:
1. You do not have to get up at night to operate the system for basic needs such as lighting or operating a fan or TV.
2. The UPS – Solar Combo guarantees uninterrupted supply for the facilities that the system is designed to operate.
3. You save a lot of money because once your solar system is installed; the solar energy inflow is free energy.
9. As a stakeholder in the academic milieu what can you identify as setback(s) in the Nigeria's educational sector?
Ans: Nearly 50 years after gaining independence from the UK, Nigeria's educational sector has remained quite unsettled. If the students do not strike, the academicians will, or the junior staff will! I remember a President of the USA challenging his fellow Americans with the charge, “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country instead.” We need such a rallying call in Nigeria today. The writer of Ecclesiastes in the Bible has this to say, “Whoever loves money never has money enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with his income…” Elsewhere, the Apostle Paul writes, “godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that…. The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.”
Many Professors in Nigeria currently earn over N100, 000 per month. Some people with ND or NCE earn less than N5, 000 a month. If anyone should go on strike over pay, not the professors in a country with so many people who cannot afford basic necessities of life.
Respect for other humans and regard for sanctity of life appear to be vanishing on our campuses. Students kill each other for the flimsiest of excuses.
Are the facilities adequate in our educational institutions? Far from it! When I was Rector of a polytechnic, it did not take long to observe that when you divert money for equipment to students' feeding (to avoid crises), you end up short changing the students. They come to school to learn and be educated. The simplest solution was to hand over catering to independent caterers that could do a much better job than institutions. In our case, there was much vested interest, people who profited from the food tendering process resisted and as a result it took time and a bit of student unrest to make the change. Happily, we quickly moved beyond that and settled into the real business of the institution.
10. Can you train our young Nigerians who do not have University education to make a living out of this solar energy initiative?
Ans: Sure! As recently as May this year, I worked with a carpenter in Ilorin on the construction of a solar fish dryer cabinet. He did an excellent job even when I was unable to stay with him while he worked on the project. Much of the work on solar energy installations can be successfully done with electricians, plumbers, carpenters (without university education) all contributing their skills as needed.
11. Have you ever engage Nigeria government on any discussions on how to explore solar energy in Nigeria as a remedy to our energy quagmire?
Ans: I happen to know several individuals in Government in Nigeria, but I never abuse that privilege. For example, I do not know His Excellency, President Yar'Adua personally, but he attended Government College, Keffi, (North-Central, Nigeria) years after I graduated from the School. If I had been in Keffi when he entered the school, he could have been my fag as was the practice in those days!
I feel the best contribution any of us can make is to help Government whenever called upon to do so, and to do so in a responsible manner. While I was in Nigeria, I took part in at least two Energy Policy forums that the Federal Government convened on energy. I am amazed at the brilliance of policy advice that various individuals and bodies have made to Government on energy issues. I am glad if and when I have opportunity to be a part of that.
12. Can you really partner with private individuals or corporate bodies in making all these major breakthroughs of yours actionable, and how can you be reached in this regard?
Ans: I surely would love to partner with others on easing the energy crunch that makes life so unbearable to so many Nigerians but we must do so on mutually acceptable terms. For example, a couple of years ago, a friend of mine who lives in Dallas, Texas, joined me and two solar energy companies in Nigeria in submitting proposals to the World Bank in response to Lighting Africa Initiative. I serve as Consultant to both solar energy companies. At least one of them has paid me in the past for consulting. The other often pleaded “we are struggling sir”! The reality that we all face is that there is no free lunch. I will gladly share what I know with anyone who wants to know what I know, but remember I too have bills to pay, and a worker is entitled to his wages. I read a joke on the internet. A barber gave free haircut to a priest, then a policeman, then a Nigerian business man. The priest came back with books etc. to show his gratitude, while the policeman brought donuts to the barber. Guess what, the Nigerian businessman brought eleven or so other Nigerians for free haircut! The good book says, “It is more blesse d to give than to receive.” We need to change our mind set and replace a “grabbing” mindset with a “giving” spirit.
13. If you really want to go into full scale solar energy installations in Nigeria don't you think you will have problems in importing some of the materials that could be required for the task, or what do you think?
Ans: The good news is that much of the materials needed for solar energy installations can be procured locally. Solar thermal applications, for example, require such items like wood, glass, mirrors, nails, and hinges, virtually all of which are available locally. On the other hand, key items needed in solar electricity generation must be imported from other countries. Interestingly, here in the USA, the situation is not very different. The solar panels I buy here are imported mostly from Europe (Germany, for example) and China. Deep cycle batteries are frequently from China. A major retailer in the USA buys most of its wares from China. We in Nigeria are not shy about buying cars, TVs, and other things that make life more comfortable from all over the world, so why should solar gadgets be an exception? I really wish Government will help here because for once we can import products that have a potential to ease the burden of inadequate energy supply that thus far has proved to be intractable and damaging to the quality of life in the country. I pray for policies that facilitate such imports for the good of the country.
14. What is your advice for Nigeria especially governments at all level, and what do you expect them to hope for in the energy sector?
Ans: History teaches us that no one learns anything from history, so said somebody! Why don't we learn from the experiences of other nations? If I may borrow a saying that President Obama used during his campaign for the Presidency of the United States, “To keep doing the same thing and yet expect a different outcome is insanity!” The public is mistaken in thinking that Government can do it all. If you have a plumbing job in the house you go to a plumber. If you are hungry, you look for a caterer in a bukateria or a fast food place depending on how much money you have. If you are sick, you look for the Doctor. I think the word I am looking for is privatization.
Here in the USA, Government is not in the electricity generating business. Even the UK today has privatized much of the electricity generating business. The water supply in a subdivision I once lived in was entirely private. Government in Nigeria gets involved and bogged down trying to do things they are ill-equipped to do well. It is time for well-meaning people in Government to focus on governing and let those equipped to do the work get on with responding to the challenges facing the nation. Government has responsibility for policy and safeguarding of public safety and orderliness. There is a role for agencies like ECN (the Energy Commission of Nigeria), but as experience has shown in Nigeria from the other ECN (Electricity Corporation of Nigeria) to NEPA (Never Expect Power At all) to PHCN (Problem Has Changed Name) – the characterizations not mine – Nigeria is still a long way from generating anywhere close to the electric power needed. Government agencies are simply not equipped for the task assigned. Government should find out best practices elsewhere, and then promote forging of private/public partnerships that will deliver the desired results. Thus far, several Government initiatives have often turned out to be dead ends, unfortunately.
This leads me to a second piece of advice for Government. Accountability is the word. Contracts have been awarded with hardly any results to show. From the Governor down to the labourer, everyone must be held accountable. The labourer who does not clear the grounds he is assigned should only be paid for what he did. The Governor who pays contractors for job not done according to the terms of the contract should be impeached and removed. People may not like this kind of talk, but equality before the law must be the core value of a civilized society.
How do we connect the dots? The energy crisis in Nigeria today calls for unusual measures. The Obasanjo 1 regime used to work with “think tanks”, but now we need “think, act and deliver tanks”. How about identifying brilliant minds in the country and putting them to work for the country? No fanfare, but give them a free hand and the means to succeed. Provide for their bread and butter needs, and hold them accountable. Be specific about goals, and judge them by their success in achieving the goals set. I am impressed that faced with challenge from Russia in the 1950s, the USA not only caught up in a hurry in the space arena but became the only country to send man safely to the Moon and back home. I wonder how they did it!
For more information about Professor George Adebiyi kindly visit:http://www.me.msstate.edu/people/Faculty/Adebiyi/adebiyi.html#research; or mail him at:george_adebiyi@yahoo.com"

This tribute was added by William Adelekan on 19th October 2016

"It was with great sadness that my wife and I received the shocking news of the passing away of our dear friend and Brother in Christ, Professor George Adebiyi. It was a privilege for me to have known George over a period of about 56 years. I first met him in 1960 when I was in Form 1 and he was in Form 2 at Government College, Keffi, in Nigeria. We went on to attend King’s College, Lagos, and The Victoria University of Manchester, in The UK.

GG (GrandPa George) was my Best Man at our wedding in Yaba Baptist Church, Lagos, in 1973. He was a gentleman, humble, humorous, dependable, hospitable and exceptionally brilliant. We thank God for all his impressive achievements.

We believe that we shall meet our dear Brother George again when Jesus Christ comes back for His own on the Day of the Rapture.

May God deeply comfort every member of the Adebiyi family.

William Adelekan,
Luanda, Angola."

This tribute was added by Engr Okoene on 19th October 2016

"This is a very shocking and painful piece of bad news. I first met George end of 1965 and we eventually became Shell scholarship students together. George, David Balogun and I shared a room in Port Harcourt prior to our departure for further studies in the UK. The memory of those days remain with me.
You are sorely missed George and may the Almighty God receive your soul into his bosom in Jesus name."

This tribute was added by Sola Oduko on 19th October 2016

"TRIBUTE TO A GENIAL GENIUS – GEORGE ADEBISI ADEBIYI
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
 
September 1967, William Adelekan and ‘Sola Oduko arrived in Manchester to read Mechanical Engineering on Shell-BP scholarship.  George Adebiyi was a Shell scholar a year ahead of us.  George gave us a soft-landing starting by taking us to the theatre that first night.  He and William had been schoolmates in Keffi and King’s College, Lagos. So was David Balogun; I believe he was at Nottingham.  The Christian bond between us flourished and, on return to Nigeria, we were all actively involved in New Estate Baptist Church, Surulere (NEBC) for considerable periods of time.
 
George and I shared a Tutor at Manchester – Dr (later Professor) Annand.  When in July 1969 George sat his finals, I asked Dr Annand “How did George do?”  He replied: “As well as expected!”.  That summed up the undergraduate feat of the engineering genius.  I believe his record in Mechanical Engineering at Manchester will be hard to beat; in just about every test, every assignment every exam, every subject, George scored no less than 90%. Indeed several of his students at Mississippi in their Evaluation of their Professor described him as a genius or very brilliant.
 
George was a genial genius, very friendly, very helpful and very humble.  He also served the Lord with his musical talent, playing the organ at NEBC and other congregations in which he worshipped.  During his stint as NEBC Youth President he spearheaded the compilation of a Song Book of modern pieces.
 
Highly recognized and honoured in the USA where he was a Professor and latterly a Professor Emeritus, yet he did not forget his origin.  For a good many years he was returning home to teach in Nigerian universities.  Upon retirement he has been on the faculty of the Nigerian Baptist Convention’s ‘Bowen University’ at Iwo.  I have heard that, in consonance with his passion for Solar Energy exploitation, his Quarters at Bowen if fully solar-powered.
 
George Washington Carver (1861?-1943) was a slave boy who metamorphosed into a genius regarded as the father of modern Agricultural Science.  One of his biographies was titled ‘God’s Scientist’.  Our own George Adebiyi has followed in the trail blazed by Carver; so I refer to him as God’s Engineering Genius!  Interestingly, both Georges were true believers and manifested musical talents.  The earlier George laboured at Booker Taliafero Washington’s Tuskegee Institute in Alabama while our George did his at neighbouring Mississippi.  We praise our Lord for the memories of both.
 
We have no abiding home on this earth; we bloom as flowers and even the sweetest roses expire at God’s bidding.  George Adebisi Adebiyi, Professor Emeritus, God’s Engineering Genius; it was our privilege to watch you bloom, to behold your Christian and professional beauty, to enjoy the aroma of your godly scent.  Our Lord, in His wisdom has translated you from our fellowship to His ineffable arena of endless joy and pleasures.  Now you are free from our regular power failures and having no need for Solar Panels ‘for there, the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb’ (Rev 21:23)
 
Adieu, beloved brother and friend; ‘we’ll see you when we get there’ - in God’s good time.  Adieu, George Adebisi Adebiyi, Professor Emeritus, God’s Engineering genius!
 
 
‘Sola Oduko"

This tribute was added by Adeyemo Kolawole on 18th October 2016

"TRIBUTE TO A LOVING      
BROTHER!
It is a shocking news to hear about your departure though we cannot deny the nature.
Brother Adebiyi was an exemplary man in his lifetime. He spent his life with the spirit of hard work, honesty, diligence, patience & tolerance. He was caring and generous also Godfearing.
Brother Adebiyi has been a great gift to our generation with his contribution to the SOLAR world we have benefitted from his expertise.
Brother Adebiyi you are dear to us with your family. He was a man of peace, love, and always eager to assist. It was 13years ago we got to know him and since then we have been enjoying the virtue and love the Lord endowed him with.
Brother Adebiyi departure has reminded us again that there's always an end to every journey. A man's journey in the world is only for a while but eternity is forever.
To God be the glory for the gift of Professor Adebiyi and a life well spent.
We cannot pray for the dead for their works will follow them. May your wife, children and grand children continue to enjoy long life in good health and enjoy more of the mercy and goodness of God in the land of the living. Amen!"

This tribute was added by Buki Bukoye on 17th October 2016

"You were such a kind hearted and an amazing guardian to me. You never ceased to encourage me and other kids  to prioritize education and earn the best grades at all times!
I'm forever grateful to you for  sharing your home with me, my siblings and random group of friends from all over the world  to spend time with you and the  family during thanksgiving when we would have otherwise been stuck in empty dorms.
I pray loving memories bring strength and comfort to your family at this time. You're gone too soon.....and will be missed."

This tribute was added by Lilian Solanke on 17th October 2016

"George, (Baba Nike) we never thought our last meeting at Bristol UK would be the last one ever !
God Knows Best.
May Your Gentle Soul Continue To Rest Forever In Everlasting Perfect Peace. Amen
And we pray The Lord God Console Every Member Of Your Family IJMN.
Mrs Solanke & the girls.
Bristol UK."

This tribute was added by Olabisi Araoye on 17th October 2016

"My dearest Cousin, we spoke a couple of weeks ago when I was outside the country to attend to a family member's health. You're loving and caring. You served God in your Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria and outermost part of the world. You were dependable, an encourager and a role model. Our Family, the Church, Nigeria, United States of America and the World just lost a great Icon. My dear Uncle Bisi rest at the bossom of our Lord Jesus Christ till resurrection day."

This tribute was added by Doyin Aderinto on 16th October 2016

"It is sad that we have lost one of the brilliant minds America has ever known; and more importantly a godly friend. May the family find comfort in God's promise of everlasting life. Thank you for all he did for his glory. Good-bye...until we meet again at the feet of Jesus. I Corinthians 15: 51-55.
Love in Christ, the Aderintos"

This tribute was added by Busuyi Onabolu on 16th October 2016

"The King's College, Lagos Class set of 1959-63-65 (The Golden Ingots) mourn the passing to glory of our dear soft spoken, humorous and gentle classmate George who joined us in 1964 for the 2 years Higher School Certificate course. George made his mark in his pursuit of his studies and his sheer academic excellence.

We commiserate with his family and pray that the Lord God whom he served will grant his soul peace.

Busuyi ONABOLU,
National Coordinator."

This tribute was added by Doyin Oluntona on 16th October 2016

"Ahh Uncle George an ever so endearing uncle, always looking out for us all. Going the extra mile to give an encouraging word and to just be there. Words cannot express how much you will be missed.  You left a Godly legacy and we love you sooo much. You are fondly remembered, It is well. God knows best."

This tribute was added by Dr. & Mrs. Nick-Taiye Obiri on 16th October 2016

"My first contact with Dr. Adebiyi was over 50 years ago at King’s College, where he was a candidate for the Higher School Certificate and I was a candidate for the School Certificate. It was the practice then to identify HSC students as “Citizen”. We lived at opposite ends of campus so we did not interact much at the time. Nevertheless, “Citizen” Adebiyi had a distinguished aura around him that made him noticeable as an intellectual but also as an easily approachable person. It would be more than 25 years later before our paths would cross again at Mississippi State University where I got to know him at closer quarters. He was indeed very comfortable around people clearly being guided by Paul’s admonition that we live peaceably with all men (Romans12:18).  He also lived his faith in Christ. It is notable that a Professor in my Department at the time, who sang with him in the choir of the First Baptist Church, once made the unsolicited comment about him that he is a good Christian man. Over the years I witnessed his love for science and his willingness to share it.

Although from our perspective, his passing was premature, and we will miss him dearly, we are consoled by the knowledge that because of his faith in Christ, he has merely transitioned to a better place.

Rest in Peace!

Nick $ Taiye Obiri."

This tribute was added by Folakemi Omojasola on 16th October 2016

"Very pleasant, good natured and fatherly. Rest on Prof. May God comfort the family.
Folakemi Omojasola"

This tribute was added by Gbenga Oduko on 15th October 2016

"Uncle- regret to learn of your passing to glory too soon. I knew you through my Senior brother and met you in New Estate Baptist Church, Surulere, Lagos, you created a great legacy in my mind. We discussed early this year on the phone and not knowing that would be the last time. We will miss your usual Christmas and New Year greetings. May our Lord comfort your families and friends - Rest in Peace - Gbenga Oduko - Australia"

This tribute was added by Gbenga Oduko on 15th October 2016

"Uncle- regret to learn of your passing to glory too soon. I knew you through my Senior brother and met you in New Estate Baptist Church, Surulere, Lagos, you created a great legacy in my mind. We discussed early this year on the phone and not knowing that would be the last time. We will miss your usual Christmas and New Year greetings. May our Lord comfort your families and friends - Rest in Peace - Gbenga Oduko - Australia"

This tribute was added by Michael Larinde on 14th October 2016

"SUN RE O, BYE, ADIOS,
                 PROFESSOR GEORGE ADEBISI ADEBIYI (AKA BABA ABEBEYE)
                                  UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN!

Saturday, the 16th of October 2016, will always remain indelible in the minds of many of us as a day when Nigeria lost one of it’s illustrious sons in diaspora. The news of Prof. Adebiyi’s “sudden and untimely” death was like a bad dream, which we all wished was not true. But alas, it turned out to be true – confirming the adage “man proposes but God disposes”.  
What manner of a man was Prof. George Adebiyi?  The answer could be found in his multi-dimensional personality. First and foremost, George was a child of God, who within the limit of human frailties tried his utmost best to serve the Lord and humanity. He was a devoted and good family man, a faithful and dedicated friend; a peoples’ man; an encourager; a man of vision and a man with a good sense of humor. George had a very short memory of keeping grudges. All these attributes came to light within the “short period of 30 years” when God brought him across our way in Starkville Mississippi.
His passion for God came out clearly when he joined us and some other family friends – the Aderintos, Obiris and Sokoya – who were in Starkville, at that time, in our weekly house-to-house Christian fellowship. His outstanding qualities as a loving family man became even more glaring when he was joined by his adorable wife, Iyabo Adebiyi. The duo was an incredibly awesome team in the ministry of meeting the needs of African foreign students who attended high school or University in the Starkville Mississippi. George and his darling wife, Iyabo, have touched lives of many people - spread around the globe with their obedience to show the love of Christ to whoever needs help.
George as a family man excelled where ordinary men have failed. Using his favorite saying - “the proof of the porridge is in the taste” as a measuring rod, excellent young adults he nurtured and mentored into becoming the diverse professionals of today is a pointer to his success as a very good father and educator. The list of beneficiaries of his fatherly cares include scores of other young adults – including children of friends - many of who are billed to attend his funeral.
Baba Abebeye (shortened to Baba o), as I fondly called him, was a man of great sense of humor - a tool he often employed  to disarm potential antagonists and pry open doors of goodwill where such were lacking. His sense of humor and friendly-cum-jovial disposition became his identity amongst those who knew or encountered him.
George’s transition, I refuse to call it death because I know he is with the Lord, begs an age-old question; Why do bad things happen to good people? Or even an array of questions like - why did George die too soon? why was he in the car crash that led to his death? These were the thoughts that rushed into our minds when the news was broken.  We love him and would have preferred to have him with us till a much later date or till rapture – whichever comes first. However, it is very clear that God loves him more, and decided to take him home at this time. George lived a fruitful and very productive life and fulfilled the mission God set for him before he was even born.  It can be said of George that his life fits perfectly well with 2 Timothy 4:7-8 because he has “fought a good fight, he has finished his course, he has kept the faith:  Henceforth there is laid up for him a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give him at that day: and unto all them also that love his appearing”.

So Baba Abebeye, my wife and I; and indeed my entire family members, are celebrating your life INSTEAD of mourning you. We will miss you dearly. We thank you for being a part of our life, and for a relationship that transcended friendship to brotherhood (Proverbs 18:24).  An Angel is missing tonight. Olufe ninu Oluwa, sun re o o.

Dr. & Mrs. Michael-Iyabo Larinde's family"

This tribute was added by Funmilayo Adebiyi on 14th October 2016

"George, my brother in law, my friend.  How can I describe you and our relationship. Though junior brother to my late husband, but you were my brother  from another mother.  You stood for me and by me,against  all odds, in the mist of the ranging storm  in my life throughout  your life. For encouraging my sons your nephews to study in America I remain  eternally  grateful. I will miss you so much, but my consolation is that we shall meet at the feet  of our Lord Jesus Christ  whom you love.. Goodnight  George, my brother and friend."

This tribute was added by David Adebola Balogun on 14th October 2016

"'Bisi, we had 5 years of fun in Keffi (I=Baba, you=Gari), the 2 years of fun in Kings College, plus a life time of friendship. And now suddenly, you left without a word of good bye! You lived life to the full, while trying your best to live for Jesus. Thank God you followed Him to the end and now, you've beaten us to the gate of heaven, I believe His angels are there to meet you and His smiling face to welcome you.

Farewell, dear friend. Rest in His love. We'll meet again by His grace.
'Bola"

This tribute was added by Bolanle Bukoye on 14th October 2016

"I am so terribly saddened by the news. I am very thankful to have known you my early years in the US. I cannot thank you enough for helping to make Mississippi home to me and my siblings. Our parents felt so  much more comfortable sending us to college there knowing you were nearby. Thank you for the many rides to church on Sundays and the frequent treat to the Chinese restaurant after the service, a welcome break from the sad cafeteria meals. I also remember the very special road trip to St.Louis, MO for one of our spring breaks. It was such a delight to escape and explore a whole new place. Thank you so much for the beautiful memories, they will remain in my heart always!
Indeed, you were a special gift from God and I take solace in the truth that we will one day be reunited in heaven.
Your life was truly a blessing and an inspiration. Rest in peace."

This tribute was added by Deborah Eseyin on 14th October 2016

"Hmm, words cannot describe how I feel as I lay this flower. I still cannot believe I will never see you again. You won't be there to ask me how Calculus is going, advice me on how to sort out school stuff, offer me books to help me pass my classes. I still cannot believe that you won't be here to see me graduate.There are so many things that make me cry whenever I think about you. You were more than a father to me. You'll be greatly missed because you impacted my life in your own special way. Even though I wish you were still with us, I am happy because I know you are in a better place with no sorrow, pain or tears but with everlasting joy and peace. Rest in peace Sir."

This tribute was added by Bukky ST on 14th October 2016

"Daddy wa, thank you for filling the space my earthly father couldn't fill.It's comforting to know I'll see you someday in heaven...where the tea is better.❤️."

This tribute was added by Nicole Fisher on 14th October 2016

"I always say that I showed up later than everyone else, but I gained an amazing family. Thank you Dad for accepting my family & me into your home & heart. You will be missed."

This tribute was added by Bimbola Bukoye on 14th October 2016

"You will be sorely missed Sir! There is no other way to slice it - you were a good man and you never missed an opportunity to encourage and push all around you to do better.  Thank you for sharing your deep thoughts...your company was always a delight!  We'll continue to strive to do better - just like you always counselled.  Rest in peace my "loco parentis".
"Ore wa" Abimbola!"

This tribute was added by Iyabo Adebiyi on 13th October 2016

"My dear Adebisi, you could not stand leaving me for three weeks by my self but you have left me forever, we shall meet at Jesus feet, I love you, my dearest one. Adebisi sun re o."

This tribute was added by aDEKOLA oMIKUNLE on 13th October 2016

"O! what  a shocking loss. So you only visited to say goodbye!!
A devoted family man. Father, teacher, motivator,mentor,brother,friend,
confidant,uncle,relative and business associate to many. Ardent dream
pursuer, community player,responsible to a fault..you played your part with distinction..Adieu my brother and  friend"

This tribute was added by oluwaseun adesina on 12th October 2016

""The "sun" has indeed set you free"
  a life well spent is better than rubies

Baba,You'll be forever missed
Seun adesina."

This tribute was added by oluwaseun adesina on 12th October 2016

""The "sun" has indeed set you free"
  a life well spent is better than rubies

Baba,You'll be forever missed
Seun adesina."

This tribute was added by oluwaseun adesina on 12th October 2016

""The "sun" has indeed set you free"
  a life well spent is better than rubies

Baba,You'll be forever missed
Seun adesina."

This tribute was added by Debo Adebiyi on 12th October 2016

"Dad, you've gone too soon; you didn't even say good bye.  

But I know ... yes I know, you're right up there in heaven with the angels and our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  May your soul rest in perfect peace.

Love Always, Debo."


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This memorial is administered by:

AdeDoyin Adebiyi
Debo Adebiyi
Aderonke Adebiyi

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