ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Edwin Sumner Cook, 84 years old, born on January 21, 1937, and passed away on June 5, 2021. We will remember him forever.

Contributions to the American Cancer Society can be made in his name.

Posted by Brian Cook on June 9, 2021
   Whenever I talked about my father to someone for the first time, I would always say that he walked in the shoes of Jesus. And what I meant by that was that he consistently expressed all of Christ's character qualities throughout his life. It was evidenced in his marriage to my beautiful mother, in his fatherhood of me and my siblings, and in his kindness and compassion to all those he encountered. His love transcended the pains and frustrations that so often complicate human relationships. He was slow to anger and quick to forgive. He always extended a kind word or gesture, even to those of us who needed more of God's work in our lives. Rarely do I remember him ever criticizing someone, and I can't honestly recall him ever talking bad about others. Rather, he had an amazing ability to highlight someone's assets no matter how many personal struggles they dealt with. He purposely seized on any hope and encouragement he could give others. This trait of his was something I witnessed repeatedly in my life both personally and through others I introduced my father to.
   For those of you who have seen "It's a Wonderful Life", you could say my father was George Bailey. He married his first and only sweetheart and raised four children while working diligently to support his family. He consistently sacrificed himself to elevate the lives of those around him. And he never gave in to the lures and temptations of material success, popularity, status, and recognition. His primary concern was always for the lives of those around him.
   My father was one of those people who would strike up conversations with strangers wherever he was. It wasn’t unusual to lose my father in a store and then find him sitting on a bench or down some random aisle talking to someone. Then when approached he would introduce the person by name. Often when we got in the car, I would ask him how he knew that person and he would say that he just met them. Even more amazing was all the details he would know about their lives in the short time that he sat with them. I remember a story he told me once about needing change for a vending machine. He asked a stranger nearby for change of a dollar or two. My father struck up a personal conversation with the man before heading off to use the vending machine. After his purchase, he had two quarters left over. He went back to the man and explained that he would hold onto the two quarters and place them near his Bible when he got home so that he would remember to say a prayer for the man’s son as well as my brother David. Apparently, my father had learned that both of their sons were experiencing similar hardships and struggles. These kinds of stories were commonplace in my father’s life. Just ask my mom, lol. 
   Another interesting characteristic of my father’s life was that people all over the place knew him. And I’m not talking about neighbors or people from the church or friends of family. One day I went into the post office to send off a package. The postal worker asked me how my dad was doing after he saw the name Cook on the address label. Similar things happened at the local garden center and the marinas nearby. These were all people my Dad took the time to inquire and to learn about. He often knew the names their children, their health issues, personal accomplishments, and the history of where they grew up and had lived.
   I am so grateful for having been part of his life, for having been raised, taught, disciplined, encouraged, and loved by him. My time with him is filled with life lessons, adventures, funny stories, and interesting conversations. He shared the love of Christ with all those around him and enlightened our lives with words of kindness, wisdom, compassion, and hope. I love you Dad. “Well done, good and faithful servant. Enter into the joy of the Lord.” Matthew 25:23.

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Posted by Brian Cook on June 9, 2021
   Whenever I talked about my father to someone for the first time, I would always say that he walked in the shoes of Jesus. And what I meant by that was that he consistently expressed all of Christ's character qualities throughout his life. It was evidenced in his marriage to my beautiful mother, in his fatherhood of me and my siblings, and in his kindness and compassion to all those he encountered. His love transcended the pains and frustrations that so often complicate human relationships. He was slow to anger and quick to forgive. He always extended a kind word or gesture, even to those of us who needed more of God's work in our lives. Rarely do I remember him ever criticizing someone, and I can't honestly recall him ever talking bad about others. Rather, he had an amazing ability to highlight someone's assets no matter how many personal struggles they dealt with. He purposely seized on any hope and encouragement he could give others. This trait of his was something I witnessed repeatedly in my life both personally and through others I introduced my father to.
   For those of you who have seen "It's a Wonderful Life", you could say my father was George Bailey. He married his first and only sweetheart and raised four children while working diligently to support his family. He consistently sacrificed himself to elevate the lives of those around him. And he never gave in to the lures and temptations of material success, popularity, status, and recognition. His primary concern was always for the lives of those around him.
   My father was one of those people who would strike up conversations with strangers wherever he was. It wasn’t unusual to lose my father in a store and then find him sitting on a bench or down some random aisle talking to someone. Then when approached he would introduce the person by name. Often when we got in the car, I would ask him how he knew that person and he would say that he just met them. Even more amazing was all the details he would know about their lives in the short time that he sat with them. I remember a story he told me once about needing change for a vending machine. He asked a stranger nearby for change of a dollar or two. My father struck up a personal conversation with the man before heading off to use the vending machine. After his purchase, he had two quarters left over. He went back to the man and explained that he would hold onto the two quarters and place them near his Bible when he got home so that he would remember to say a prayer for the man’s son as well as my brother David. Apparently, my father had learned that both of their sons were experiencing similar hardships and struggles. These kinds of stories were commonplace in my father’s life. Just ask my mom, lol. 
   Another interesting characteristic of my father’s life was that people all over the place knew him. And I’m not talking about neighbors or people from the church or friends of family. One day I went into the post office to send off a package. The postal worker asked me how my dad was doing after he saw the name Cook on the address label. Similar things happened at the local garden center and the marinas nearby. These were all people my Dad took the time to inquire and to learn about. He often knew the names their children, their health issues, personal accomplishments, and the history of where they grew up and had lived.
   I am so grateful for having been part of his life, for having been raised, taught, disciplined, encouraged, and loved by him. My time with him is filled with life lessons, adventures, funny stories, and interesting conversations. He shared the love of Christ with all those around him and enlightened our lives with words of kindness, wisdom, compassion, and hope. I love you Dad. “Well done, good and faithful servant. Enter into the joy of the Lord.” Matthew 25:23.
his Life
Edwin S. Cook (Ted) passed away on June 5, 2021 at the age of 84.  He was born on January 21, 1937 to E. Sumner and Lucille G. Cook of Merrick, NY.  He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Maureen, and their children David, Sharon, Kevin and Brian, son-in-law Robert Letwins and grandson Robert Letwins.  He also leaves behind his sister Carolyn Naujoks, of Flammersbach, Germany and his brothers-in-law Wilfried Naujoks, Edward Wittekind, and Paul Sainsbury, as well as many nieces and nephews.

Ted graduated from W.C. Mepham H.S. in Bellmore, NY and received an A.S. in Electrical Technology from Farmingdale A&T College, a B.S. in Mathematics from Hofstra University, and a M.S. in Business Administration from C.W. Post College.

Ted worked for Hazeltine Corp, Grumman, and retired from his position as a Planning Manager at Verizon in 1995 where he worked for 25 years.  Ted was a Member and Treasurer of the Sunrise Yacht Club, a Sunday School teacher and an Evangelism Explosion leader at the Smithtown Gospel Tabernacle.  He was also involved in many Bible studies in various places near where he lived and worked.   

Ted and Maureen moved to beautiful Smith Mountain Lake, VA to enjoy their retirement years.  They enjoyed travelling across the United States and Europe, taking cruises, and also travelling to the Holy Land and China.  They enjoyed the winter months for many years at Deer Creek RV and Golf Resort.

Ted was a kind, caring, compassionate, and honest man.  He also had a clever sense of humor and loved sharing his faith and the Gospel with others. He looked forward to being reunited with his parents, his sister Gail, and other family and friends who have passed on.

His favorite hymns were “It is Well With My Soul” and “What a Day that Shall be, When My Jesus I Shall See”.

Ted is now at peace in God’s loving hands.
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