ForeverMissed
CELEBRATION OF LIFE
Ebusua Baatan Nana Aba Tekyiwa (aka Mrs Victoria des Bordes) of Nkuma-Kyerba Twidan Ebusua, Cape Coast; Rt. Rev. D.K.M. Stephens and members of the Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ; the Afful Family; the Atta-Mills Family; Obaapanyin Mrs. Theresa Odeh; Obaapanyin Baaba Yanney, Obaapayin Adjoa Sekyiwa (aka Mrs. Gifty Graham); Obaapanyin Nana Esi (aka Jane Hagan); Obaapanyin Araba Kyerba (aka Victoria Mensah); Obaapanyin Efua Kweiba (aka Mary Sackey);Dr. Cadman Atta-Mills; Prof. and Mrs. James D. Quarshie; Hon. Samuel Atta-Mills; Mr. Ebo Dennis; Mr. Francis Quaye; Dr. John Attram; Mr. George Quagraine; Mrs. Henrietta Eyison; the Atta-Mills family of Enyan Denkyira; Aboradze Ebusuapanyin Kwesi Munko Apagya; Mr. Kweku Seidu; Ms. Kate Baidoo; Prof. and Mrs. John Micah, the 1959 Group of Old Achimotans; the Principal and Staff members of the OLA College of Education, Cape Coast; the Mathematical Association of Ghana and the entire Nkuma-Kyerba Twidan Ebusua of Cape Coast and abroad, announce with deep gratitude to the Almighty God, the transition into glory of their beloved:


MRS. EMMA EFFIE AFFUL

(Née Atta-Mills)

A Retired Tutor of the OLA College of Education, Cape Coast

Aged: 78
                                                           ***************
Funeral Arrangements are as follows:

There will be no wake-keeping.

Private Burial Service: Friday, 19th March 2021 at 9:00 am, at the Afful residence - House Number 72/5 Nkanfoa, Cape Coast (viewing starts at 8:00 am).

LINKS TO LIVE FEED BELOW.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE LIVE STREAMING OF THE SERVICE ON YOUTUBE

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Internment: Asokyeano Cemetary, Cape Coast.

Thanksgiving Service: Sunday, 21st March 2021 at 8:30 am, Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ, Prospect Hill, Kotokuraba, Cape Coast.

Attire: Black and White.

                                                           ***************

Children: Ms. Adwowa Asafuaba Afful, Ms. Adjoa Kwansema Afful (Esq.), Dr. Ama Fowa Hammond and Dr. Efua Amoonua Afful.

Grandchildren: Aba N. Afful-Buabin, Kofi N. Hammond, Kobina M. Hammond.

Siblings: Dr. Cadman Atta-Mills, Mrs. Mercy A. A. Quarshie, Hon. Samuel Atta-Mills.

In-Laws: Mrs. Ernestina Naadu Mills, Mrs. Nani Makonnen Atta-Mills, Mr. Edward A. K. N. Dennis, Prof. James D. Quarshie, Mrs. Doris Atta-Mills, Mr. Daniel Armah Hammond.

Cousins: Mensah, Brew, Enninful, Quaye, Hayfron, Yanney, Dawson-Ahmoah, (Attabra), Kuranchi, Sackey, Hagan brothers and sisters.

Nieces and Nephews: Mr. Kofi Sam Atta-Mills, Mr. Kodwo Sam Atta-Mills, Mr. Kwame Amonoo Atta-Mills, Dr. Sara Efua Ayesha Mills, Ms. Mikala Atta-Mills, Mr. Adom K. A. Dennis, Dr. Nyimdzee E. G. Adu-Gyamfi; Mrs. Emmanuella A. K. Smith-Esseh, Mrs. Enyidado A. E. Owusu, Ms. Joana Mills Quarshie, Ms. Swanzy Quarshie, Ms. Awotwe Quarshie, Ms. Tawiah Quarshie, Mr. Kofi Sam Atta-Mills, Mr. Ekow Amonoo Atta-Mills, Ms. Aba Dede Atta-Mills.

Other Nieces and Nephews: Awuku, Addaquay, Koufie, Gyandoh, Mensah, Churcher, Dadson, Brew, Attram, Mensah-Agyei, Quaye, Hayfron, Baffoe, Darko, Odeh, Asamoah, Dawson-Ahmoah, Graham, Thompson, Abakah and allied families.

CHIEF MOURNERS
Ebusua Baatan Nana Aba Tekyiwa of Nkuma-Kyerba Twidan Ebusua of Cape Coast; Bishop D.K.M. Stephens and members of the Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ; the Afful Family; the Atta-Mills Family; Mr. Francis Quaye; Dr. John Attram; Mr. George Quagraine; Mrs. Henrietta Eyison; Aboradadze Ebusuaphanyin Kwesi Munko Apagya; Prof. and Mrs. John Micah, the 1959 Group of Old Achimotans; the Principal and Staff members of the OLA College of Education; the Mathematical Association of Ghana.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 31, 2021
“A MENTOR, ADVISOR AND TEACHER”
TRIBUTE BY REV. SR. ELIZABETH AMOAKO-ARHEN
Immediate Past Principal, OLA College of Education
(2001 – 2021)


“What we have once enjoyed deeply we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes a part of us.” Helen Keller (American Author)

When I heard of the news of Mrs. Afful’s passing, so many thoughts and memories raced through my mind. Immediately, I thought about my last visit to her home at Nkanfoa with Sr. Felicia Harry and Beatrice Hammond. The memories of our conversation on that Thursday, January 7, 2021 kept playing on my mind. Apart from her limited mobility, Mrs. Afful looked very well and we spoke at length about so many issues. She inquired about our work, other Reverend Sisters she knew, and of course, the College she dedicated her entire working life to serving, especially, how the college was faring in its new status as a University College of Education. I could still feel the excitement in her voice. She was quite witty and her laughter was so infectious. Little did we know it was going to be our last encounter with her. Honestly, her demise came as a shock to us.

Many of us join the family to bid Auntie Emma farewell in the joy of having been blessed with her graciousness and having been a part of her life. Madam, we thank you for all the generosity you showered on us and for the gift that you were to society. 

It was a great privilege being on the staff of the OLA College with Mrs. Afful, because it afforded me the opportunity to learn so much from her work ethic and to tap into her unique values and principles. She embodied the College’s trademark of promoting and instilling holistic education in female students. Auntie Emma sacrificed so much of her time and comfort for the well-being of her students and the College. Her level of kindness, her truly sincere loving spirit and commitment to empowering her female students in the area of mathematics was phenomenal.

I was always inspired by the way and manner in which she engaged her class and made her teaching of mathematics an activity-based experience for students. So many teaching and learning materials accompanied every lesson she taught, and one sometimes wondered how she managed to make time for all those preparations. It is not surprising therefore that, the OLA College of Education became the first and the only female College of Education in Ghana to major in mathematics and science.

I feel privileged and honoured to have had this unique woman on the staff when I took over as Principal of the OLA College in 2001. Mrs. Emma Afful gave me her all: time, energy, pieces of advice, effort, etc. and was extremely supportive. I was often captivated by her boundless energy and her commitment to ensure that I succeeded as Principal. Auntie Emma, I salute you! I appreciate every sacrifice you made on my behalf!

Mrs. Afful was a woman of excellence, a consistent advocate for the promotion of quality teacher education and of female teachers as models of discipline in society. You faithfully contributed your quota to teacher education with great honour and integrity. Our great mathematics teacher educator, we acknowledge your great contributions to making OLA teacher trainees appreciate mathematics as a part of life.

Mrs. Emma Afful left the College eighteen (18) years ago, BUT her spirit never left us. Her name will always remain in the annals of our great college. Indeed, you have left this world, but your legacy and contribution to the study and teaching of mathematics will live forever.

Mrs. Emma Afful, the dynamic Head of the Mathematics Department for twenty years, you lived your life well and served your creator faithfully. May the earth rest gently on you, until we all meet again.

“Death is nothing else but going home to God, where the bond of love will be unbroken for all eternity”. Mother Teresa

Auntie Emma, Da yie! Mrs. Afful, Nyame mfa wokra nsie! Sister Effie, Rest in Perfect Peace. AMEN
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRUBUTE BY GHANA YOUTH FOR CHRIST INTERNATIONAL, CENTRAL REGIONAL BOARD

‘And I heard a voice from heaven saying, “Write this: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.” Blessed indeed, says the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours, for their deeds follow them!’ Rev. 14:13.

Mrs. Emma Afful served as a Board member of the Cape Coast Youth for Christ (YFC) from the late 1980s.

She contributed immensely, both in cash and materially, to the growth of the ministry, not only in the Central Region, but also, nationally.

She brought her experience as a mother, tutor and counsellor to bear on the work of the ministry. Sister Emma, as we called her, had a calm disposition, even in the face of challenging moments in the ministry. She used the words of scripture to spur us on when things were hard in the ministry.

YFC has lost a mother, but we know she is resting in the Lord.

Fare thee well, Sister Emma.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Faustina Forson, OLAPSAN 1996

Aooww Mrs. Afful, we're saddened by your departure, especially those of us who have not seen you in a very long time. How I wish we could put the clock back, but alas, it is in your best interest to leave this world and unite with your maker; for God so loved you to call you home having accomplished your excellent labour here on earth. Mrs. Emma Afful, those of us who passed through your hands feel privileged to have been taught by you in such a unique way. May God keep your beautiful soul in his bosom. Rest on daughter of Zion. We'll always cherish your memories.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Beatrice Donkoh OLAPSAN 1998

Good people die every day, and yet not all of them affirm for us the goodness of God in humanity and leadership the way you did. Rest Well, our Mother and Counsellor.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Maggita Ama Mill, OLAPSAN 1993

Mrs. Emma Afful was full of energy and the live wire of the mathematics department of the OLA Training College in those days. Madam often advised us to strive for excellence and aspire to be good, passionate teachers. She was a great teacher who knew her stuff, prepared well and got her students fully engaged in lessons. Mrs. Afful truly cared about her students; a great mathematician who made the learning of mathematics lively and enjoyable. Thank you, Mum! May the good Lord receive you into Heaven. Rest in perfect peace, Mrs. Emma Afful. Adieu!!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Vera Anno-Atua, OLAPSAN 2001

My favourite Mathematics tutor, you made the learning of mathematics quite simple and interesting. I remember how we solved addition and subtraction like Basic 2 pupils. God bless you for making me a good teacher and I’ll forever be grateful. May the almighty God keep your humble and beautiful soul in perfect peace. Rest well Ma’am!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Francisca Amoako, OLAPSAN 1991

Mrs. Afful made the study of mathematics easy. She had sound knowledge of the subject. Her style of teaching mathematics was very engaging. She was a good motivator and a caring mother. It was all about her fingers that performed the magic. Rest in Peace, Dynamic Mum.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Roberta Yankah, OLAPSAN 1996

Auntie Emma, the wonderful female Mathematics tutor, is gone to eternity! Mama, you made the subject that hitherto had been the preserve of men look so simple and accessible to female teacher trainees at OLA Training College. For our dynamic Maths tutor, each topic came with its own story and creative teaching pedagogy. We'll forever remember and cherish you, our mother and mentor. Sleep well till we meet again.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Mabel Nunoo, OLAPSAN 2000

May she have eternal rest with the Lord! Mrs. Afful really made a great impact in my life and will forever be grateful!!!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Linda Darbo, OLAPSAN 2001

Madam, you were placed at OLA College for a purpose, to train women in mathematics. You definitely killed the phobia some of us had with mathematics. Mrs. Afful was a great tutor who made a great impact on the lives of many noble ladies. I will forever be grateful for having you as my mathematics tutor. Enjoy eternal rest with your Maker. Amen.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Yvonne Abotsi, OLAPSAN 1998

An astute noble woman she was. The dexterity with which she taught mathematics made me develop interest in mathematics as a subject. Mrs. Afful, may her gentle soul rest in perfect peace!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Faustina Slippe Mensah, OLAPSAN

Mrs. Emma Afful was a great mathematician, mentor and counsellor. She played all these roles so perfectly and made a great impact on our lives. Mum, I want you to know that you have left indelible marks on us. You have fought a good fight. Our hearts go out with condolences to the entire bereaved family. Mum, rest peacefully in the bosom of your maker. Adieu.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Isabella Ayiah, OLAPSAN 96

You are an epitome of a good teacher and mother. Madam set out her teaching in a very practical mode. Your methodology to teaching mathematics made me enjoy maths lessons so much. Thank you for contributing to the teacher I am today. Rest well madam in the arms of your maker.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Emelia Aikins, OLAPSAN

Mrs. Emma Afful used to say: ɔyɛ asɛm o! at certain points during her lessons. This was when she had tried to get us to understand some concepts and students didn’t seem to get it. I personally enjoyed her lessons so much. Great tutor! You have made an impact on our lives. We are truly grateful. May your gentle soul rest in peace with God our Father. Amen.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Penelope Pearce-Pearson, OLAPSAN 2000

She was such a sweet lady and a mother figure, very pleasant and always full of smiles. I really admired her back in College and she became my teacher model. My condolences to her family. Rest well Mrs. Emma Afful.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Angelina Sam-Amoah (Neè Ocran), OLAPSAN 1983

I was privileged to be among the students Mrs. Afful taught when she returned from further studies in the United States with her husband, Dr. Afful. Aww, what an astute mathematics tutor par excellence she was. May her gentle soul rest in perfect peace!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Christabel Jane Plange; OLAPSAN

Our one time dedicated and committed tutor, a mathematics tutor par excellence; thank you for contributing to make us who we are today. You were a mother by all standards. You cannot be forgotten, Mrs. Afful. May your beautiful soul find rest in the Lord. Sleep well Mum.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Frances Gyepi Garbrah; OLAPSAN

Mrs. Emma Afful, I still have the resource book you supplied to us as our reference resource, way back in 1995. It has been a very useful and helpful resource for teaching mathematics in a practical way. May her sweet soul rest in perfect peace.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Adjoa Debrah Akomaning, OLAPSAN 1992

My affable, lively mathematics tutor. You taught with so much passion, and you made me appreciate mathematics as a necessity of life. As we mourn your passing from this earthly dwelling, I pray the Almighty God to keep you well in His bosom. Rest well Mum.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Marjorie Affenyi, OLAPSAN 1984

Dearest Mrs. Afful, you were a beautiful mathematics tutor by all standards. You modelled teaching to be pleasure and fun; no wonder most of us craved to be one of your kind. You also took so much pleasure and interest in sports and other extracurricular activities and encouraged us (your students) to be all-rounded persons. I recall your joy when I led the College Sports Team to win the inter-colleges Table Tennis tournament at the Komenda Training College. You carried me on your lap and made me swollen-headed. You indeed won the hearts of many of your trainees at OLA then. You are gone but never to be forgotten. We miss your gracious smiles. Rest in Peace with your Maker. 
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Alberta Kpeleku, OLAPSAN 2002

We know and recognize that there are many teachers in our past who have given their hearts, minds and souls out to nurture in us the things that they saw as vital to our education, critical to our success, and important for our future. In keeping with this, I want to say that Mrs. Afful, our mathematics tutor, was not just a teacher but also a mother. She advised and counselled us as well to make us better women. I quite remember when most of our colleagues failed mathematics in the mock exams prior to our external examination, she became so worried that she quickly contacted the Principal, Sr. Elizabeth, to talk to us. They assembled all those who did not get the pass mark, grouped them and organized daily morning and evening classes for them without a fee. Lo and behold, the external results were excellent that year. Mrs. Afful is a GEM and worth celebrating. Rest in perfect peace, Madam.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Faustina Gyatsen, OLAPSAN 1993

Mathematics to me was something mysterious! I studied maths like any other reading subject. It was Mrs. Emma Afful who motivated me to develop interest in the subject, by observing her teach. From her teaching, I came to appreciate mathematics as a practical subject and never looked back. For instance, once upon a time she took our class to measure the edges of the classroom floor and led us to work out the dimensions of classroom. My memory still recollects how my interest in mathematics began with her unique teaching methodology. Thank you Mrs. Afful for the impact you made on my life. May your soul Rest in Peace. Forever in our hearts.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Theresa Ackom, OLAPSAN 1991

Mrs. Afful was a good teacher. She inspired us and brought out the best in us to make us effective teachers and role models. Some of us students used to call her “a set of students” because anytime she came to class and had to explain some concepts in mathematics, she used us (students) to set examples to make her point. Some of us developed interest in mathematics simply because of the way you taught us. May your soul rest in perfect peace.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Sarah Nyamiah (Nèe Asare), OLAPSAN 1993

Mrs. Emma Afful was a lovely teacher and a good mother figure. I once told her I wished she was my teacher for every class. She made me love Mathematics, because of the creative way with which she taught. Her demeanour and love for mathematics motivated me to learn the subject. I remember staying up late in the night working hard, yet loving and passionately learning her subject. She loved me because I put a lot of effort into learning mathematics and did all my assignments. I challenged her sometimes when she marked my assignments wrong, and interestingly, she took time to explain to me why I was wrong. I loved mathematics and she pushed me to be the better student of mathematics. She had a gift to teach. Mrs. Afful, I am so grateful to you for the passion you injected in me and I pray that God grants you eternal rest. Amen.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Dr. Hannah Benedicta Taylor (1993)

Mrs. Afful was the first and last female mathematician to have taught me mathematics. I feared mathematics and its related subjects, but she demystified the subject and literally killed the mathematics phobia I had. She really made me appreciate the subject and later develop great interest it. I feel privileged to have been nurtured by such an astute mathematician. Thanks to her gentleness and creativity, I came to love some aspects of mathematics, such as advanced quantitative techniques and Biostatistics. Fare thee well Mum!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Benedicta Nyarko, OLAPSAN 1997

I really enjoyed Mrs. Emma Afful’s teaching because of the way she incorporated so many practical activities and made her lessons lively. My cherished teacher, may your beautiful soul rest in peace. Amen.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Abena Ampene, OLAPSAN 1987.

How are the mighty fallen! Mrs. Afful, you loved all your students with no discrimination whatsoever. You made us feel loved and accepted in your class. For the four years I spent in OLA, I never saw you annoyed during lessons notwithstanding our weaknesses. I remember one day when thieves came and stole our things from the drying lines. I did not have a single underwear and wept my heart out. Mrs. Afful got to know about this and the following day, she brought me plenty of panties and other things. This is the woman we are mourning today, so loving and caring. Mum, may God grant you eternal rest. Amen.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Agnes Abaidoo, OLAPSAN 1977

Mrs. Emma Effie Afful (nèe Emma Effie Atta-Mills); I wish I could turn back the clock just to have her us with. You were an excellent mathematics tutor! You inspired the teacher qualities in the students you taught at OLA. A real gem, you were. We your students are very sad by your transition and we can only share our lovely memories of you; the stunning smiles that eased our tensions and lightened our hearts. Queen of beauty and style, you will always live in our hearts. Fare thee well, Auntie Emma. Rest in perfect peace Mama.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
A TRIBUTE BY OLA COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

A life well lived is a precious gift,
of hope and strength and grace,
From someone who has made our world
a brighter, better place.
It is filled with moments, sweet and sad,
With friendships formed and good times shared.
And laughter through the years
of joy of pride and pleasure
a living, lasting memory.
our grateful heart’s will treasure
(anonymous)

A woman who made an impact on the lives of thousands of students and teachers has died aged 78.

Mrs. Emma Afful was a Mathematics teacher at the prestigious institution of OLA College of Education, Cape Coast where she taught for 31 years. She was born in 1942.

Mrs. Afful was an extraordinary woman. She was one of the great teachers who contributed to the tradition that made OLA College of Education known for the quality of its teaching. Her teaching was electrifying; she wanted nothing less than to rouse the unaware. Her influence changed her students’ outlook on the purpose of living and made her students feel forever unsatisfied with not quite knowing and not quite doing. She enlarged her students’ whole conception of the fascination and complexity of societies and individuals, past and present, and made it impossible for them to do anything less than their best for the world of which she made her students feel so much a part. After learning what hard intellectual really was, her students could not have left their own decision-making to the mercy of whims and moods and accidental events and passing enthusiasms.

To Mrs. Emma Afful, there was nothing unfriendly or incompatible within any field or discipline. For her also there were no chasms between the community and the student and the teacher. There is an erroneous notion today that there is a dichotomy between intellectual discovery and self-discovery- that if you are bent on one of these missions, you cannot achieve the other. Mrs. Emma Afful made it clear that a great teacher can help students to achieve both. She never suggested a life of dutiful self-sacrifice, but suggested rather the deep satisfaction that comes through self-realization in active form. To look at Mrs. Afful’s own life was to understand this. She was a convincing example of wholeness. Through her hard work, she was selected as one of the best participants to attend the advance course in the United Kingdom on a commonwealth scholarship.

For all of her erudition, experience, and distinction, Mrs. Afful was absolutely without arrogance or affectation. She invested tremendous effort in improving the life of her students and colleagues. She always cared about policy, teaching and about the intersection of these, making the world a better place. She never cared about who got the credit. She had a lasting impact. She is sorely missed.

May she rest in perfect peace. AMEN
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE IN HONOUR OF OUR DEAR SISTER EMMA EFFIE AFFUL
BY THE FELLOWSHIP OF EVANGELICAL WOMEN (FEW)

She stretches out her hands to the distaff and her hand holds the spindles; she extends her hand to the poor, yes, she reaches out her hands to the needy. (Proverbs 31:19-20)

The Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ has really lost a great gem, an illustrious and virtuous vessel in the vineyard. Sister Emma Afful (Mrs.), affectionately called Auntie Emma, as one of the founding members of the Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ was very instrumental in the Women’s Ministry as well as the Fellowship of the Evangelical Women (FEW).

She was a Past President of the Fellowship of Evangelical Women. During her tenure as President, the Fellowship flourished. She took the members through sessions, talks and practicals. These included Bible studies, Marital Life, Giving, Home Management, Education and Cookery. She was generous and offered a helping hand to especially the young ladies who got married. She made every woman’s child her own and really got concerned about their education. Sister Emma loved to make pastries so we even thought she was a Home Economics Tutor at the O.L.A. Teachers’ Training College now O.L.A. College of Education, only to know she taught Mathematics. Christmas seasons were joyful as pastries and drinks were given out to all members.

Sister Emma Afful (Mrs.) was always ready to assist in offering awards to the children and the youth who excelled academically and during quiz competitions in the church. Bible study with her was very unique and practical at meetings.

Really, you were a virtuous woman. Even when you were ill, you tried to be in church, assisted. Sister Emma Afful your life is worth celebrated. We are grateful to God for your life and you will be always remembered.

May you find eternal rest in the bosom of the Almighty God till we meet again.

Da yie! Dofo fonafo, Da yie!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY THE EVANGELICAL METHODIST CHURCH OF CHRIST

“The strife is over, the battle done
Now is the victor’s triumph won,
Now may the song of praise begun,
Alleluia”

Mrs. Emma Afful was a full member of the Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ. She was a staunch member of the church and participated fully in all church activities. Mrs. Afful, affectionately called Auntie Emma was a founding member of the EMCC. In 1986 when the crisis in the Methodist Church at Cape Coast District led to the establishment of the church, she and her husband, the Late Prof. Kofi Nketsia Afful, joined the church wholeheartedly.

She was very hardworking, industrious, an adviser, a preacher and a friend to all. Auntie Emma was a role model to most of us the youth. She was prayerful, a counselor, a mother and friend all the youth would want to have. She was a cheerful giver. Despite her social class and academic level, she was always with the poor and the needy in the church. Her love for the youth is mostly manifested when you tell Daddy and Mama that you are getting married. She will move heaven and earth to pull surprises you will never forget. She was never tired.

As a preacher, she taught us to love all and hate none. She was a Bible teacher, leader for Fellowship of Evangelical Women, First Director of Christian Education in the Church, a member of the Local Session of the Holy Spirit Cathedral and a renowned Synod member. The Church cannot overlook the part she played as the Treasurer to the Building Committee of the Holy Spirit Cathedral. She worked assiduously and faithfully to ensure that Building Funds were used appropriately. She was diligent in monetary spending and made it easier for the church to get worth of the money spent.

About sixteen years ago, Auntie Emma fell sick. We knew she was a strong woman and would overcome it. A month turned to a year and a year to years. Mama did not get better. One surprising thing was she never lost her memory. She remembered everyone whether young or old. We continued to pray for her hoping she would get up from her sick bed one day, but God said, our thoughts are not His thoughts, and our minds not His.

On 16th February, 2021 Mama finally joined the glorious assembly in heaven. She has finished the race. Now, she rests in the bosom of her Lord who she worked for diligently.

ɔko pa no ako ewie, Edwuma pa no, ayε ewie
Nyame mfa wo nsie kεpem dε Yebehyia bio.

Mrs. Emma Effie Afful, Mama, Auntie Emma, Auntie Effie, Da yie.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY DR. ANTOINETTE QUIST (Niece)

The brightest smile, the warmest heart. A mighty tree has fallen.
Auntie Effie, as we affectionately called her, was the kindest and warmest soul you would ever meet. Her smile was the brightest and most reassuring and always conveyed to you that all would be well. Her kindness was legendary, and her legend, nurturing, as many who knew her would attest to. She was always on a mission to salvage, and salvage she did. The problem need not make it to her door, and she was on it with an unmatched and undivided passion. Furniture it seems was not her favorite thing, as she seemed to have little use for it, needing to be perpetually in motion.

For us, her nieces and nephews, she always made sure she herded us into the family fold - “come over and meet your uncle, aunt, cousin…” - it held great import for her. Lost and unaccounted-for relatives and relationships were things she particularly dreaded, she confided one breezy evening, as we sat out on the patio upstairs, making war with the occasional mosquito that breached the tranquility. Auntie Effie, life in secondary school for us was bearable because you made it so, making sure we had freshly cooked meals most weekends and filling our coin & note pouches.

We looked forward to your visits to Takoradi, bringing a supply of “mpatua” (mini tilapias) fried, stewed, and of course, delicious! You and Uncle Kofi (of blessed memory) always welcomed us into your lovely home and made sure we were comfortable. Our hearts are broken by your sudden departure, but alas, your maker needs you most.

Oh death, where is your sting; oh grave, where is your victory? A golden heart has stopped beating. Hardworking hands at rest. Tireless feet stilled. Auntie Effie, damirifa due, due, due. Rest well, my dear Aunt.

Anto
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY DR. FELIX AUGUSTINE ATO MENSAH (Nephew)

‘Life is eternal, love is immortal, and death is only a horizon; and a horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight.’ RW Raymond.

It was 1985. School was on vacation and I looked forward to playing soccer and fishing in nearby streams with my friends. Those plans were abruptly changed, as I learnt from my parents that I would be spending the vacation in Cape Coast with an aunt and her family. I would later learn her name was ‘Auntie Effie.’ It was a very memorable vacation and marked my exposure to the extended family in Cape Coast.

Auntie Effie was generosity personified. She made me feel at home, and in her usual style, always ensured that everyone was comfortable. During my years in boarding school, her home was always my solace, especially when we had ‘free exeat.’ It was always warm, welcoming, and peaceful. Her bubbly personality ensured there was never a dull moment and she promptly educated me about the extended family, our history, and my grandfather and great grandfather who I never met. She was a true custodian of family history, structure, and tradition. How I wish I had documented all our conversations.

Auntie Effie was always there, showing up when you least expected her but needed her the most. She was a reliable rock that one could always fall on, and looking back, I do not know how she was there for so many of us. I recall the number of times she showed up at Saint Augustine’s college on visiting Sunday bringing me a warm meal when I had resigned myself to the tasteless dining hall food for dinner. And I do not know how she showed up at the Adisadel park when I was running away from a scuffle between Saint Augustine’s and Adisadel during an inter-colleges sports event. She quickly whisked me away in her car to my relief. Auntie Effie, I can only say you were an angel in your own right.

On my way back home after what – unknown to me - would be my last visit to your house, I hatched a plan to record our next conversation and make notes for future reference. That was not to be. ‘Lives are like rivers and eventually they go where they must, not where we want them to.’

Auntie Effie, what you leave behind is not what is engraved on a stone monument or the tributes we write, but what is woven into the hearts and lives of the many people you touched in multiple ways.

Your life was a blessing, and your memory will forever be a treasure. Fare thee well and thank you.

Nantsew yie; Nyame n’fa wo kra n’sie asomdwee mu.

Ato Mensah, or as you preferred to call me, M’apa Okrodu.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY MS JOANA QUARSHIE, MS SWANZY QUARSHIE, MS AWOTWE QUARSHIE AND MS MERCY QUARSHIE (Nieces)

Aunt Effie,
You blessed us with your heart.
Your joy, your smile made the world so sweet.
Whenever we thought we were in trouble,
You would shower us with love and spoil us with treats.
No matter the years or the distance traveled,
You prepared rooms for us and welcomed us home with open arms.
Even as our family expanded, you lovingly and selflessly prepared more rooms.
When you were not well, your devotion and concern for us never faltered.
Though our hearts ache with sorrow to say goodbye,
How beautiful and precious a moment it will be to see you smile
When the Lord now welcomes you home with open arms.
We love you and we miss you, Auntie.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY MR. ADOM DENNIS, DR. NYIMDZEE ADU-GYAMFI, MRS. EMMANUELLA SMITH-ESSEH AND MRS. ENYIDADO OWUSU (Nephew and Nieces)

“My flesh and my heart fail, but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.” Psalm 73:26

Learning of Aunt Effie’s passing has brought so much pain in our hearts that it aches. We knew she had not been in the best of health for some time, but we were hopeful she was going to be around a little longer. We’ve cried and we are deeply saddened, but we are at peace knowing that she is resting in God’s bosom.

Growing up, there were a lot of ups and downs, but one of the people we could count on to be there for us was Aunt Effie. She was fun, great fun. She made sure everyone worked hard and did their part at home. She was very fair. Her narrative skills were next to none; she told us many stories of herself and her siblings growing up, and of course, some embarrassing stories about ourselves, which we wouldn’t want to repeat. She was such a tease and knew exactly how to push your buttons to get at you. More importantly, she saw every opportunity to be a great aunt and she took it. She was a great leader by example. She was a good cook and such a good dress maker. Some of us took that up later in life.

The time we spent with the Affuls was nothing short of making sure that we took our relationship with God seriously. Aunt Effie and Uncle Kofi always made sure we all participated in morning devotions and did our quiet time. Aunt Effie in particular would never come knocking on your door, but her voice would definitely wake you up, no matter how deeply you slept.

When we had problems, no matter how complex, it was always easy to talk to Aunt Effie. Sometimes we didn’t have to; she just knew what to do or say. She was one of the reasons that drew some of her nephews and nieces to Cape Coast for their secondary education. We knew she would visit or make arrangements for uncle Kofi or any of our cousins to do so. When Supi had to go to Adisadel College for the first time, she was the one who got him a “chop box” and filled it up. Our dad thought secondary school was just as good as the days he went; he had no clue! The love she had for us was practical.

Our aunt was genuinely happy for everyone, stayed involved in our lives and encouraged us in every endeavour. She was someone who always settled petty quarrels among us cousins. She treated everyone that lived under her roof as one of her own, whether it was for a day or a number of years. She was indeed a mother to all of us. She never missed an opportunity to give us life lessons. One of the things she used to say was that, “you don’t know how someone got what they have, so be content with what you have.”

Aunt Effie, you were genuinely special. You never withheld good from anyone who needed it, irrespective of whether they were enemies, friends, rich or poor. You opened your home to all and went above and beyond to handle what anyone else would naturally describe as "someone else's problem." You were the true meaning of who a practical Christian is! If we could all emulate even 10% of what you did, the world would be a better place.

Thank you for sharing your time and life here on earth with us. We are privileged to call you Aunt. We have one more angel in Heaven looking down on us.

Rest well, Aunt Effie; rest in perfect peace.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY MR. KOJO SAM ATTA-MILLS AND MR. KWAME AMONOO ATTA-MILLS (Nephews/Sons)

Although we knew this time would come someday, we are devastated to have lost our Aunt Effie. From the minute we landed in Ghana in the mid 70’s and got to our grandparents’ farm in Cape Coast, she was there for us, and quickly became our biggest fan and protector. She loved us as her own, and her eyes and heart would light up whenever she saw us. She viewed us as her sons and we loved every second of her attention and praise. She always looked out for us and gave us incredible protection and leeway. As far as we knew, she saw none of our flaws and mistakes.

When she left with our cousins for Tennessee without us, we thought our world was over, but we were reunited a few years later and the love-fest continued. We still remember that summer as one of the best reunions ever. When she moved back with her family to Cape Coast, her house became the new “family house.” Once again, she was there and in charge. A few minutes of conversation with her and you would have spilled all your beans!!! And she loved every minute of it. She was there to assist with any difficult family matter.

When we needed a caretaker for our brother Michael, she didn’t hesitate to volunteer her home. Later, her health took a turn for the worse, but her attitude and outlook never seemed to change. Reuniting with her was never difficult and there was always some family history to learn and remember (especially about all the silly things we did as children). It didn’t matter...we loved to laugh and reminisce with her.

Her passing will leave a void that can’t be filled, but we know she’s in a better place and still our biggest cheerleader. We will miss you, Auntie Effie. Thanks for your love and guidance. The memory of your beautiful soul will be with us forever. 

Your sons, Kojo Sam and Kwame Amonoo.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY MR. DANIEL ARMAH HAMMOND (Son-in-Law)

AN ODE TO A MOTHER-IN- LAW
Not many people will call their mother in–law their hero or a special friend; fortunately, my mother-in-law was both. Self-indulgence is not a craving of mine, but with you, it was different; you made me feel very special and welcome, and I loved every bit of it. I was always very comfortable in your company. I feel robbed for not being able to enjoy one more moment with you as I have been away for a while, but all the same, I feel incredibly blessed to have shared many special moments with you, and to have been a part of your life. These are memories that I will always cherish. I was very privileged to be your son–in-law. You were always accepting, understanding and never criticized or judged me. You gave Ama and I the freedom to carve out our own identity as a couple. 

Remarkably, you had very strong ties to family and community. You always sacrificed for the collective good. You took every responsibility seriously and expended your resources on the needs of members of the community, sometimes to the detriment of your immediate family. You were very generous and shared your life and possessions with many. You believed in empowering and supporting the less privileged and taught people to reach for more, but at the same time, to be content.

My hero, you will remain forever in the hearts of many. You left a legacy by living a life of self-sacrifice and contentment, forgoing material benefits for loftier ideals. You led a life of dedication, and you gave generously, expecting nothing in return. You had a big personality, you were intelligent, witty, and courageous and could be whatever you wanted to be because of your many talents. Interestingly, you chose teaching, and no other subject than mathematics. I’m proud to say that I have had people come up to me and say, your mother-in-law was a great math teacher. You were not just a math teacher, but one who had a profound impact on the lives of many, including mine.

I join many to express our gratitude to you for being passionate about several noble causes and for striving to make life worth living for those who had little or no hope. You may have departed from us physically, but you will always remain in our hearts. I don’t have the words to express how sad I am about your passing. Life will never be the same without you. I will miss you sorely, nevertheless, I take comfort in the knowledge that you are resting in the Lord’s bosom. Farewell my special friend! Farewell, my hero! Rest in Peace.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY KOFI SAM ATTA-MILLS (Nephew/Son)

Mum was my mum! For the first thirteen years of my life, I wholeheartedly believed that aunt Effie was my biological mother. I was her last child. A position I adamantly fought Amoonua for. I had and have never had anybody take such a personal interest in my wellbeing as Mum did, and for this reason and much more, news of her passing brought a feeling of overpowering sadness from which I have never been the same. Mum was my protector, my confidant, and even my blood type!

Growing up in Cape Coast, from Yaa Asantewaa Road to Nkanfoa, Mum, along with Dad, led me to Christ with our early morning devotions and never veered from this. They both knew the importance of raising me with the Word of God and taught me so many lessons and scriptures that have stuck with me throughout my life.

They taught me that the fear of God is the beginning of all wisdom. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding. (Proverbs 9:10)

Chores were non-negotiable, I was made to understand from an early age that the man that does not work does not eat. For even when we were with you, this we commanded you, that if any would not work, neither should he eat. (2 Thessalonians 3:10)

Mum never spared the rod. The ultimate expression of her love for me. He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes. (Proverbs 13:24)

Mum made sure I got the best education. She drove me to and from school and always assisted with my homework, especially mathematics. Today I can proudly say I am a ‘numbers guy’ because of her.

I remember the day she told me that she would fight my father, the Late John Evans Atta Mills, if he came to take me away from her, a funny thought to me, but a fight I would have loved to witnessed. Nevertheless, she always admonished me to ensure I drew close to my Father. Advice I am truly grateful for.

Mum, the values and norms you taught me has made me the very man that I am today. You gave me the best upbringing a child could ask for. You taught me to listen more and talk less, to always be truthful and to never steal. Your level of integrity was admirable and you always treated everyone fairly. You never discriminated against or were biased towards anyone, and the world around you loved you dearly.

You are the epitome of perfection in my eyes, it was therefore an honour to be able to name my first child Effie, after you. I can only pray that I will be able to pass on the gifts you gave me to her. She will live in the glory of your legacy.

I stand here today with a broken heart, but I choose not to mourn or be sad. I choose to be happy as I celebrate a hero, a hero who led me to my fate and guided me along a narrow path. My Hero!

You taught me to be fearless, intentional and unapologetic. You made a man out of a young boy. And if I am successful today, I owe it a great deal to you and Dad.

Even though I have lost you in the physical, you forever live in my heart and I know I have gained an angel in heaven.

Thank you for a life well lived. I am glad to have benefitted from you.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
EFFIE: THE UNOFFICIAL BIOGRAPHY WRITTEN BY A BROTHER (Cadman Atta-Mills)

I was asked to contribute to your official biography. I drew a blank. Where were you born? Where did you go school? Who were you named after? I remembered that our paths crossed at Achimota School for one year and that you were at Clark house, but that was all. I was ashamed by the paucity of my contribution to an endeavor considered de rigueur in all memorial services. It was then it dawned on me that I knew so little of you. Yet, I knew you so well!

To me, you were always just “Effie,” the adored big sister. Like a child experiences the world, you were a touch, a smell, a taste, a feel, a warmth, a comfort, a joy, a yearning, a consolation, a satiation (satisfaction). You were never defined by what you did, where you went to school, or what you accomplished in life. You were just “Effie.” You were You. My flesh and blood. You were a part of me. You defined me, as in “Emma Mills’ little brother.” That is how I was known as a child and through my first year at Achimota School. That is how I was defined. That is who I am and that is who I have always remained.

Dearest Effie, I am sure your official biography will be written, and it will be accurate. No thanks to me! It is important that it be written so that you are recorded in history. Those who did not know you (and those yet unborn) will get to know of you. I am sure it will record that you were an exceptional math teacher. And as they say in French, chapeau! for all your accomplishments. But I knew you, not of you. My biography of you is ephemeral and will not stand the test of time. They are memories: undocumented, unverifiable, unpublishable. But they are my memories of you. They are important to me, so let me recall them.

I recall one incident when we were children. I adored you. I followed you everywhere. I mimicked your every move. You led me to the backyard garden. All of a sudden you started yelling, screaming, and running. I wanted to show you I could do the same. I started yelling, screaming and running through where you had passed, only to be welcomed by a swarm of bees. You escaped the worst (with the bees). I did not fare as well. You did not escape Mamaa’s ire though for leading me into a boxing match with Muhammed Ali that I was destined to lose and lose miserably. I understood Muhammed Ali so well when he said he “moves like a butterfly and stings like a bee.” I should have learned my lesson about following you everywhere, but I never did.

There is a saying that “he is so ugly that only his mother thinks he is cute.” I always thought that, like a mother, you were my biggest fan. It was mutual admiration because I always thought you were smashing!

I recall our late-night moments together. Kofi was away and you were waiting to join him in Nashville. I would come down from Dakar to visit the children—yours and mine. After you put the children to sleep, we would spend countless hours just hanging out. Often, you would braid my hair. It was the time of the “Afro” and I had a big one. You would remove the braids before sunrise and comb my hair for an even bigger Afro. Of course, your doting on me was never free. In return, I would have to scratch your back (till my arms went limp) and/or your hair. But most of all, we would just hang out, go to the market, and go buy fish, which you loved cleaning and frying. 

I would spend countless hours watching you cook in the kitchen. I make a wicked garden egg stew that I learned from you. I did not like the groundnut soup you used to make in Nashville very much because it was too sweet. I do not mean “Ghana sweet,” but “sugar sweet.” I liked your fish (mini tilapia) stew made with palm oil. I tried to make it once with bigger fish, but it did not turn out well - too watery. I blamed it on American tomatoes. 

After Mamaa, (and actually well before her demise) you blossomed into the matriarch of the “Atta-Mills Siblings.” Wherever you were was our home. Sister Araba and Adwoa followed you everywhere once you started working. I came often to visit in Nashville. Sammy came to stay with you there. I thought I had “my room” at Nkanfoa until I realized that it was also “Fiifi’s room.” You were always ferocious in your defense of us. 

Sammy said it so well. We started out as seven siblings and now there are only three of us. What he forgot to add was that, the three remaining will never feel whole again. You took a huge chunk of me with you when you were recalled by your maker because, Effie (Emma Mills, Emma Afful), you defined me! 

Dearest sister, Rest in Peace. May the Good Lord envelope you in His warm embrace and provide you with eternal rest. Effie, don’t forget to say hello to Mamaa, Paa, Fiifi, Adwoa, and Nana Aba. Effie, Godspeed!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE FROM THE ATTA-MILLS SIBLINGS

Through all the changing scenes of life,
In trouble and in Joy,
The praises of my God shall still
My heart and tongue employ
                  MHB 427 Verse 1

As the first born of the family, our dearest big sister, you played your role, and played it with excellence as a mother, caregiver, and a protector for all your siblings, as well as for our parents Mamaa and Paa in their old age. Sister Effie, as we affectionately called you, your home became a home for us all, to the extent that people referred to your home, not as the Afful home, but as the Atta-Mills home. You always insisted that we all had to stay in your home, with the blessing of your dear husband, Prof. Afful of blessed memory. You took care of not only your biological children, but also freely and joyfully welcomed children of your siblings into your home. You happily visited children of your siblings in schools and colleges in various parts of the country and provided for their needs. Some of us further took the advantage to store our personal effects at any convenient place we found available in your home.

In Brother Fiifi’s Presidential campaigns, you played a big role; and when he was in Cape Coast, your home became his residence and campaign office. You took delight in caring for him and his entourage. You went to the extent of being involved in some campaign activities such as the distribution of T-shirts and other paraphernalia. It was most unfortunate that when the time for celebration came as Brother Fiifi won the Presidential election, you were not in the best of health.

It was a big blow to us as siblings when your health declined in 2005. You were greatly missed in the 2008 winning Presidential campaign for Brother Fiifi. In spite of your condition, we still continued to enjoy your company and your knowledge of our histories on both Paa and Maama’s sides of the family.

Our dearest Sister Effie, it is sad to bid you also farewell. As Sammy has rightly reminded us, we started out as seven siblings, lost one as a child, and we have continued to lose others as adults, and now we are only three remaining; what a big vacuum we now have! Cadman, Mercy, and Sammy bid you farewell. As you go, we also remember Mamaa, Paa, Brother Fiifi, Adwoa, and Nana Aba. May the good Lord continue to keep you all safe until we meet again!

Da Yie Dofo Pa, Da Yie!!
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE BY MS. ABA N. AFFUL-BUABIN, MR. KOFI N. HAMMOND AND MR. KOBINA M. HAMMOND (Grandchildren)

No one was ready for how hard Grandma’s passing has hit. It feels like just yesterday when we all hugged her good bye: Aba to go back to school, after quietly receiving money from Grandma, as she usually did; and Kofi and Kobina, to travel. Little did we all know that this would be the last time we would all see our precious Grandma.

Our Grandma was a gem. She was everything you could ask for in a grandma. She was kind, caring and thoughtful. She shared everything that she had with us, from her money, to all the goodies that our parents brought her. Grandma cared so much about us and made sure that we were happy. We used to congregate in her room most of the time, either to escape the wrath of any of our parents, knowing she would defend us no matter what, or to spend time watching the Premier League football with her. These were fun times. Her favourite team was Manchester United. Grandma didn’t mind all the noise we used to make when we got together. Rather, she would have hearty conversations with us, reminiscing about her school days, how she met grandpa, and what our parents were like when they were young, among many other stories. We loved to listen to and spend time with her.

Those who knew Grandma knew that she was hilarious. You can’t think about Grandma without smiling. She had a big personality and she knew how to make us laugh.

She was also very disciplined. This aspect of her life left an indelible mark on the lives of those who were blessed to meet her. Even though everyday seemed the same for Grandma, including her daily leisure trips to town, she kept her composure and her faith in God. Grandma would reprimand you if she had to. It was very important to her that we lived morally upright lives and supported our parents in everything they did.

She cared greatly about education, and we remember that every time a visit to Cape Coast was over, and it was time to leave, she would tell us to learn hard. She was always very excited to hear about our grades, and she was pleased to know that we were all very good in mathematics. She encouraged us to work hard and to enjoy learning.

Our Grandma was a God-fearing woman. She passed her beliefs on to us, and always encouraged us to pray. Before every meal, we remember seeing her pray and bless her food. Those of us in Cape Coast did bible studies with her every morning.

Kobina was also named after Grandma, and it seemed quite obvious that he was her favourite. Around her, we all had to strive to please Kobina, who considered it an honor to be named after her and enjoyed all the privileges that came with the name, including his gold ring, with his initials inscribed on it.

To say that Grandma will be missed is an understatement. While we have suffered a loss, we know that heaven has gained a special angel. Thank you for the people you have made us, the lives you changed, and the impact you made. You lived a full, happy and family-filled life, now is your time to rest in the bosom of your maker. You will forever be loved and missed. Rest in perfect peace, Grandma.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRIBUTE TO OUR DARLING MOTHER (Asafuaba, Kwansema, Fowa and Amoonua)

Not too long ago, some of you joined us at the University of Cape Coast auditorium to celebrate the life of our father, the late Prof. K.N Afful. We had sincerely hoped that it would be a long time before we gathered again to celebrate another life, beautifully and purposely lived, the life of our mother, Mrs. Emma Effie Afful. In fact, we had hoped that the next big gathering of relatives, friends and loved ones would be a celebration our mother’s 80th birthday, for which some of us had already started planning.

Accordingly, while we believe we are justified in feeling cheated of the joy of having our parents around to support our dreams, advise us, cheer us on, and most definitely rile us up, we choose to give thanks to God for honoring us, by keeping to his side of the bargain in respect of our days on earth. Psalm 90:10 states, “Our days may come to seventy years, or eighty, if our strength endures…” This promise was fulfilled in the lives of our parents. What more could we ask for?

When we sat down to write this tribute, as sad as we were, we couldn’t help but break into peals of laughter because we recalled many interesting and humorous moments we had with our mother. Our mother is probably the best gift that God gave us. She was a hardworking visionary, with an entertaining sense of humor; a selfless and compassionate person, whom we grew to appreciate tremendously as we experienced life.

Our mum was a visionary. To borrow her own words, “emi, me greatest gift nye me foresight.” She always knew the consequences or as she would say, “the repercussions” of one’s not-well-thought-out actions, and she would hasten to let you know. Thus, she came across as a busybody, but most definitely, a good and well-intentioned one. Being the first of seven siblings, she felt an urgent responsibility to protect the whole family, and she had very little regard for one’s age when dispensing unsolicited advice or correcting people. She had strong convictions and she was fearless. We recall one of her siblings telling us that, “hom maame, oyɛ too known.” She simply couldn’t help it! Our mother believed that individual problems and actions were family property, and had to be checked, lest the whole family suffered. However, some years ago, when mummy became indisposed, and less engaging, it was abundantly clear that there was a deep void in both the Atta-Mills and Afful families, and we all desperately yearned for a busybody who would muster courage to say the obvious, a characteristic, which like truth, remains the first casualty in most human endeavors, to borrow the words of Aeschylus, the Greek dramatist.

She was hardworking. Those who know her well will testify to the fact that she was highly dedicated to her work. You just had to run into one of her OLA students and they would tell you what a great mathematics and science teacher she was, and how they grew to love mathematics because of her teaching style. She was a gifted teacher! She was at a point the National Treasurer of the Mathematical Association of Ghana and this position saw her travel around the country for meetings and workshops, and she did all this with ease.

The outcome of her hard work was evident at home. We had a spectrum of animals in our backyard. We had rabbits, goats, sheep, hens and ducks, which we looked after by ourselves, and we hated it. Still in our backyard, we had plantains, cocoyam, tomatoes, peppers, onions, cassava, carrots, sugarcane, corn, all planted and tended to by her farmhands. Our mother always had something to do and didn’t understand if you didn’t. She couldn’t stand any form of laziness. We all had assigned morning chores, which we often did most grudgingly, and hardly without her prompting. Thus, her daily anthem was: “anapa biara, ɔwɔdɛ me se hom edwuma recitation,” in a not-so-calm voice. Her daily trips to the seashore meant that there were always huge trays of fish to clean in our home, and our mum expected everyone to help, even if you had an exam to write the next day. She may have found the fish cleaning process therapeutic; we did not. Some days, she would take us to her father’s farm near Elmina to work as farm hands and when we slacked in our duties, which was often, she would start singing, “Fa dɛw yɛ w’egya n’edwuma,” hoping to guilt us into working harder. Today, we can confidently say that we all have a good work ethic and it is entirely because of our mother.

Our mum started the construction of this house, using both paid and unpaid labour (us). She was no respecter of traditional family roles and responsibilities. She used to ask rhetorically who was supposed to do the men’s work in her home, since her children were women. She drew the plan for our house on this very ground. After morning devotion, we would all come here and help the paid labourers, whom she supervised with mathematical precision. As expected, her estimates of the building materials were perfect and no one could cheat her. Incidentally, she and our father looked after the main contractor who built our home until he passed away. When it came time to relocate to this place, we dragged our feet until she left the bungalow on the UCC campus, where our father worked, and came to live here by herself. Shortly after, she instructed her cousin, Uncle Egyir, to pick up her youngest daughter from secondary school at the end of the term and bring her directly to this place. The rest of us knew we had to follow mummy.

Evidently, we couldn’t have survived our time with our mother without conspiring against her. We called family meetings to discuss our differences, and at these meetings, surprisingly, she never said a word. Maybe she suspected she wouldn’t get a fair trial and so she pleaded the fifth. However, if we dared do anything after the meeting, which in her opinion was wrong, she would shout “wɔ reyɛ na me ka a wɔdze m’akɔ assizes,” that is, a trial session, usually by a judge of a superior court. We gave her “nicknames,” for ease of gossip, but she always figured them out because the names usually reflected her actions, until we gave her one she never suspected - Splash! This was over 25 years ago; she found out only 8 years ago, when we gathered to celebrate her 70th birthday.

Our Splash was a stickler for honesty and she expected the same from everyone. If you told a lie or you took something without her permission, she would forecast, “daakye bi ɛbɛda fiadze,” meaning, you would be imprisoned one day for lying or stealing!

She was loyal and believed that good deeds deserved to be rewarded. She obviously favoured some relatives; she always excused their shortcomings, and when we enquired why, she would begin with “hom ye mboframba, 1942…,” thus placing the issue out of your reach, while explaining how she was rewarding them for something their mother did for her mother at the beginning of the 20th century. She was also a bona fide repository of family history, who while working with us on one project or the other, would give us a detailed account of our history. If only we could remember half of what she told us?

She was full of cautionary tales. These included: people will abandon you when you have nothing to offer them; never envy others for their possessions, you never know how they got them. Our mother had a great sense of humour. She knew how to make a joke about everything. When she fell sick and was dependent on others for help, something she detested, she learnt to accept her new status with humour. She would call us on the phone and while explaining that “wɔre abuse me fundamental human rights,” she would add “mara me da no adom do.” Sometimes when we called her, she would give monosyllabic answers to our questions, which was indicative of the fact that there was a potential “back-stabber” in her room. If we asked to confirm that this was the case, she would simply respond “mmhmm” She simply got it.

She was selfless and compassionate. She loved her family. Like Sophocles’ Antigone, she loved passionately, especially her brothers and sisters. She felt responsible for them and their children. Her siblings tell us stories about the many sacrifices she made for the Atta-Mills family. Some of them lived with her, she bought provisions for some of them, paid the school fees of some of them, and lived, at some point in time with at least one child of almost all her siblings. On weekends, she would cook and visit her nephews and nieces in boarding schools in Cape Coast, and they all knew they could always count on their Aunt Effie. We are told that some days she would drive to the Cape Coast hospital on her way home from work and pay hospital bills for the needy, negotiate for them to be given blood transfusions, even if there was no relative of theirs around to donate blood, and sometimes drive the patients to the bus station upon discharge. We never knew about these kind acts until quite recently. No wonder whenever we asked for something that wasn’t in her budget, she would explain why we were underserving of our request - we were either lazy or greedy! With joy, she took great care of both of her parents in their old age and she recruited all of us in performing the day-to-day tasks and responsibilities required to ensure their comfort.

Morning devotions were important to her. She would sing and clap loudly at 5:30am each day to wake us up to pray. She couldn’t stand any form of mediocrity and embarrassment. She would say “m’adze a mekyir nye embarrassment.” She could not stand lateness and inadequate preparation for functions. Everything to be done to perfection.

Mummy loved to bake. Christmas celebrations were incomplete without her doughnuts, pies and cakes. Every year, she distributed her treats to members of her church during the 24th night service of songs, and to those who worked with daddy at the Department of Economics. Those who visited the Afful household during the Christmas season were served and left with packaged baked goods.

She loved her grandchildren. When she fell sick some years ago, we saw a different side of her, one that was calmer, and indulgent to the point where she warned us never to shout at her grandchildren. And yet, somedays, we yearned for the old Emma Splash!

We are grateful to those who helped looked after her, especially Brother Papa Anamuah. He was instrumental in many ways. Just as an example, mummy called Brother Papa, her long-time confidante and dependable ally, daily and rode shotgun with him almost daily for at least an hour, whether or not he had to work. Despite her ill-health, she managed to ascend and descend the stairs, with his assistance, for these rides. Brother Papa, we cannot thank you enough for your devotion, utmost patience, and most of all, vehemently taking her side in everything, even when, sometimes, she was clearly wrong. Thank you for being a faithful son to our mother, and a reliable brother to us.

Mummy valued Reverend George Quagraine’s (Sarkwa) regular visits, prayers and conversations. Sarkwa was there for both mummy and daddy. He and mummy talked about anything and everything. He usually brought her foodstuffs and regularly organized church members from the Atobiase branch of EMCC to render a host of services. Thank you, Sarkwa! God richly bless you.

Emma Splash, you were and are our hero, whom we rise to call blessed (Proverbs 31:28). We loved you and you knew it. We are, without a doubt, who we are because of you. You made the world a better place with your progressive and informed vision, magnanimity, compassion and unparalleled sense of responsibility. Rest in perfect peace!
Posted by Lebene Fiakpornoo on March 23, 2021
Amoonua, my deepest condolences to you and your big sisters. May mum rest in perfect peace. Regards
Posted by Rita Yankah on March 18, 2021
I first met Auntie Emma, as I popularly called her, in 1982 at UCC Primary where I taught her daughter, Kwansema. It didn't take long for us to be bonded, And So With Adwowa, Fowa And Amoonua.
Auntie Emma became for me a close friend and Confidante, A Mentor And Counselor. We had good times together and she followed my progress throughout, always encouraging me to aspire higher and higher.
She was such an easy going person, affable and full of life. She wouldn't hesitate to correct you when you are on the wrong side. And she does it with passion.
Traveling out, our conversations weren't often, but her health issues also made us talk sparingly.
Auntie Emma, I was confident that I was going to come down to spend longer times to make up for the lost moments. Nevertheless, it couldn't be our will. I do not have regrets as one of the virtues you reminded me of constantly was never to brood over the past.
Yes, Auntie Emma, I Will Miss You Dearly.
May The Angels Of God Guide You To The Father's Blessed Abode And May Eternal Light Shine Eternally On You.
Rest Peacefully, Mother And Friend And Mentor. Your Memories Will Live On Forever.
AMEN.
Posted by Faustina Scholarstica Koo... on March 7, 2021
I met you (Mrs Afful) in OLA TRAINING COLLEGE CAPE COAST as my Mathematics Tutor.
As Maths phobia as I was, you were able to make me overcome that fear and passed my part 1 (Mathematics) in 1998 without any hustle.
Thank you Mrs Afful, you were a mother to me and to all who passed through your hands as students of OLA Training College.
You will forever be missed. Death cannot take your memories away from me.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Efua Afful on March 31, 2021
“A MENTOR, ADVISOR AND TEACHER”
TRIBUTE BY REV. SR. ELIZABETH AMOAKO-ARHEN
Immediate Past Principal, OLA College of Education
(2001 – 2021)


“What we have once enjoyed deeply we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes a part of us.” Helen Keller (American Author)

When I heard of the news of Mrs. Afful’s passing, so many thoughts and memories raced through my mind. Immediately, I thought about my last visit to her home at Nkanfoa with Sr. Felicia Harry and Beatrice Hammond. The memories of our conversation on that Thursday, January 7, 2021 kept playing on my mind. Apart from her limited mobility, Mrs. Afful looked very well and we spoke at length about so many issues. She inquired about our work, other Reverend Sisters she knew, and of course, the College she dedicated her entire working life to serving, especially, how the college was faring in its new status as a University College of Education. I could still feel the excitement in her voice. She was quite witty and her laughter was so infectious. Little did we know it was going to be our last encounter with her. Honestly, her demise came as a shock to us.

Many of us join the family to bid Auntie Emma farewell in the joy of having been blessed with her graciousness and having been a part of her life. Madam, we thank you for all the generosity you showered on us and for the gift that you were to society. 

It was a great privilege being on the staff of the OLA College with Mrs. Afful, because it afforded me the opportunity to learn so much from her work ethic and to tap into her unique values and principles. She embodied the College’s trademark of promoting and instilling holistic education in female students. Auntie Emma sacrificed so much of her time and comfort for the well-being of her students and the College. Her level of kindness, her truly sincere loving spirit and commitment to empowering her female students in the area of mathematics was phenomenal.

I was always inspired by the way and manner in which she engaged her class and made her teaching of mathematics an activity-based experience for students. So many teaching and learning materials accompanied every lesson she taught, and one sometimes wondered how she managed to make time for all those preparations. It is not surprising therefore that, the OLA College of Education became the first and the only female College of Education in Ghana to major in mathematics and science.

I feel privileged and honoured to have had this unique woman on the staff when I took over as Principal of the OLA College in 2001. Mrs. Emma Afful gave me her all: time, energy, pieces of advice, effort, etc. and was extremely supportive. I was often captivated by her boundless energy and her commitment to ensure that I succeeded as Principal. Auntie Emma, I salute you! I appreciate every sacrifice you made on my behalf!

Mrs. Afful was a woman of excellence, a consistent advocate for the promotion of quality teacher education and of female teachers as models of discipline in society. You faithfully contributed your quota to teacher education with great honour and integrity. Our great mathematics teacher educator, we acknowledge your great contributions to making OLA teacher trainees appreciate mathematics as a part of life.

Mrs. Emma Afful left the College eighteen (18) years ago, BUT her spirit never left us. Her name will always remain in the annals of our great college. Indeed, you have left this world, but your legacy and contribution to the study and teaching of mathematics will live forever.

Mrs. Emma Afful, the dynamic Head of the Mathematics Department for twenty years, you lived your life well and served your creator faithfully. May the earth rest gently on you, until we all meet again.

“Death is nothing else but going home to God, where the bond of love will be unbroken for all eternity”. Mother Teresa

Auntie Emma, Da yie! Mrs. Afful, Nyame mfa wokra nsie! Sister Effie, Rest in Perfect Peace. AMEN
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
TRUBUTE BY GHANA YOUTH FOR CHRIST INTERNATIONAL, CENTRAL REGIONAL BOARD

‘And I heard a voice from heaven saying, “Write this: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.” Blessed indeed, says the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours, for their deeds follow them!’ Rev. 14:13.

Mrs. Emma Afful served as a Board member of the Cape Coast Youth for Christ (YFC) from the late 1980s.

She contributed immensely, both in cash and materially, to the growth of the ministry, not only in the Central Region, but also, nationally.

She brought her experience as a mother, tutor and counsellor to bear on the work of the ministry. Sister Emma, as we called her, had a calm disposition, even in the face of challenging moments in the ministry. She used the words of scripture to spur us on when things were hard in the ministry.

YFC has lost a mother, but we know she is resting in the Lord.

Fare thee well, Sister Emma.
Posted by Efua Afful on March 25, 2021
From: Faustina Forson, OLAPSAN 1996

Aooww Mrs. Afful, we're saddened by your departure, especially those of us who have not seen you in a very long time. How I wish we could put the clock back, but alas, it is in your best interest to leave this world and unite with your maker; for God so loved you to call you home having accomplished your excellent labour here on earth. Mrs. Emma Afful, those of us who passed through your hands feel privileged to have been taught by you in such a unique way. May God keep your beautiful soul in his bosom. Rest on daughter of Zion. We'll always cherish your memories.
her Life

BIOGRAPHY OF THE LATE MRS. EMMA EFFIE AFFUL (NÉE ATTA-MILLS)

What though the radiance which was once so bright

Be now forever taken from my sight,

Though nothing can bring back the hour

Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower;

We will grieve not, rather find

Strength in what remains behind.

                                                                     William Wordsworth, Intimations of Immortality


Mrs. Emma Effie Afful, the first of seven siblings, was born Emma Effie Atta-Mills to Mr. (Paa) and Mrs. (Mamaa) John Evan Atta-Mills Snr. on the 5th day of June, 1942 in Tarkwa, located in the Western Region of Ghana. Legend has it Paa was so delighted with her birth that she became the apple of his eye; he really doted on her.

Persuaded by a combination of the belief that she would not thrive at the Komenda Local Council Primary School and the crude manner in which children were disciplined at Komenda, Paa enrolled Mrs. Afful at Our Lady of Apostles (OLA) boarding school for her elementary education. Mrs. Afful commenced her secondary education at Achimota School in 1955, where she was popularly known as “Little Emma.” She was in Clark House and graduated with the class of 1959. Thereafter, she completed a two-year post-secondary programme in 1961 at the Winneba Training College. It was during her teaching practice, post-Winneba, at Mensah Sarbah Middle School in Cape Coast, that she met her best friend Sister Lucy Hanson of blessed memory.

Mrs. Afful had immense interest and excelled in the sciences. She taught Mathematics and Science at Komenda College, now the Komenda College of Education, in 1964. A year later, she enrolled at the University of Cape Coast (U.C.C.) for an associate program in Mathematics and Science. Upon completion of the associate program, she taught at Ajumako Teacher Training College. In 1967, she received a scholarship to the University of Reading in the United Kingdom (U.K.) to further her studies. She was among the international students who had the rare opportunity to meet the mother of Queen Elizabeth II during their visit to the Buckingham Palace.

One day, in 1969, her brother, the late Prof. John Evan Atta-Mills, informed her that a friend of his was in a folk-dancing troupe that would be visiting Reading, U.K., soon and that he would ask his friend to stop by and say hello. Her brother’s friend turned out to be none other than her former form mate, Kofi Nketsia Afful. As their relationship matured, she realized that she had found a keeper. Her older brother, the late Mr. Ato Harry Brew, gave her away in marriage to Prof. Afful on 27th June, 1970 in Brighton, U.K.

The couple returned to Ghana in October 1970. Shortly after the birth of their first child in late 1971, Mrs. Afful transferred to OLA College of Education from Ajumako. The couple had their second and third children in 1973 and 1975, respectively. In 1976, Mrs. Afful joined the late Prof Afful in Nashville, Tennessee, where she completed a Master’s degree, while Kofi pursued a doctorate in Economics. The couple had their last daughter in 1980.

Mrs. Afful returned to OLA College of Education, where she taught for 31 years, starting in 1971. Not only was she an effective teacher of mathematics, she also inspired her students to pursue excellence and taught them to realize their self-worth. To her, the line between work and family was pretty fine. Unquestionable evidence that she played a maternal role in the lives of her students lies in the fact that some former students, including but not limited to Mrs. Henrietta Eyison (née Afful) and Ms. Agnes Abaidoo became part of her family: Prof and Mrs. Afful stood in as parents during Sister Henrietta’s wedding. Teaching was not merely an occupation; rather, it was an involving charge to enlighten and embrace young women to excel within and outside the confines of the classroom.

Her interest in mathematics education transcended teaching. Mrs. Afful was a member of the Mathematical Association of Ghana (MAG) and served as its National Treasurer. With unequalled enthusiasm and diligence, she co-authored “Mathematics for Teacher Training in Ghana,” published in 1994.

Mrs. Afful was a staunch Christian, born and baptized into the Methodist Church. In 1986, however, the then nascent Evangelical Methodist Church of Christ (EMCC) found Mrs. Afful! She offered her home to her cousin, the late Rev. Emmanuel Odum Amissah, who had left the Methodist Church and joined a group of resolute individuals toiling assiduously to establish EMCC. The Afful family followed Rev. Amissah to church one day and promptly, Prof. and Mrs. Afful joined as founding members of the church.

Her attitude towards work at the church was nothing short of absolute immersion. She served as President of the Fellowship of Evangelical Women. She was a Leader as well as a Local Preacher. More, Mrs. Afful served as the Director of Christian Education. Further, she was a Sunday school teacher for the youth class. She was a Synod member, and, putting her mathematics skills to work, served as a treasurer of the Building Committee. She sought and accepted opportunities to support church members in a myriad of ways.

Mrs. Afful’s service to the youth was not restricted to EMCC. She also served as a Board member of Youth for Christ International beginning in the 1980s.

She leaves behind a legacy of dedication to duty, nourishment of young minds, love for family, humility and grace. Mrs. Afful will forever live on in the hearts of the many individuals whose lives she touched.

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