ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Ezinne Obi, 84 years old, born on November 24, 1936, and passed away on January 8, 2021. We will remember her forever.
Posted by Goodluck Obi on April 29, 2021
Precious in the sights of the Lord is the death of his saints. Psalm 116:15

O death! Where is thy sting? If only money could buy life, mummy you would have been alive today.
Diamond mother, you have left a great void too difficult to fill. I lack words to describe you and the kind of mother you were. My siblings and I owe a lot of whatever we’ve become to you. You were a rare gem, an epitome of motherhood, you guided us your children (biological and others) aright in the love and fear of God. Your tutelage was outstanding both as a professional teacher, mother and home maker. Growing up, you shared work (domestic chores) for us (including the many wards in your home), after which you will announce results for us every week. You were a great disciplinarian, who was an ardent believer of the saying “spare the rod and spoil the child”. Kai mummy, your cane and flogging no get part two o! Those night flogging when we had gone astray, they did wonders on us. We all learnt how to be responsible very early in life. You were accused of training your male children and wards like women - mummy we thank you for this “feminine” training you gave us and we are deeply grateful. The society is better off for that.

You thought us to be nice and kind to people. You thought us to forgive people easily, even those who are after and against us. You taught us to render no man evil for evil (Roman 12:17). You will always say “were ezi ihe merie ihe ojoo”. “Lie low and say nothing” was a quote you always used for us whenever we wanted to react like the youths we are. I do not remember any one that was your enemy. You never told us to avoid anyone or don’t go to anybody’s house because that person is/was your enemy. There will always be misunderstanding in human interactions and relationships and you always chose the path of peace and reconciliation. Mummy, you were an epitome of Christianity.

Mummy you were full of wisdom. Told us stories that molded us. Above all, your sense of humour was next to none. You led us early to the church - from Sunday school in the ACM, to Choir, to AYF and even in adulthood you continued to monitor us. One of the best birthday gifts I got in my life was from you, mum - I can’t forget the Igbo Bible you gave me on my birthday in 1979. Thank you so much. I cherish that igbo Bible. You thought me Abu 215 and Abu 279 as a kid. I love those hymns and will always remember you whenever and wherever I hear or sing them. The lyrics are so soothing and on point. Mummy you thought us many psalms including but not limited to Psalm 130, 121, 23, 91 amongst others. Again thank you.

Mummy your story is full of lessons and emulations. Despite your numerous challenges at different stages of your life, you found a way to navigate and made a success and envy of it all. From childhood, you did not allow your poliomyelitis challenge to bring you down. Despite this challenge and being a girl child, you still actualised your destiny to becoming a headmistress of repute, a teacher par excellence. Mummy, we took this “never say never” attitude of yours. You always reminded us, that we can do all things through Christ who strengthened us. Phil 4:13.

As a wife, you loved and respected your husband till death. You remained loyal and faithful despite all. For many years when your husband was away developing himself educationally (which I believe was a mutual agreement) from Alvan Ikoku, to NYSC in Gboko Benue state, to the University of Nigeria Nsukka (UNN) and to all the other places subsequently, you held forth the home front which included many wards and relations in addition to your children. Mummy, God has blessed you.

Mummy, you loved singing. Any one who knows you and comes close to you will always pick one song or the other from you. Your voice remained sonorous even till death, how then can we not be choristers with good voices? In fact your last days were full of singing. The way and manner in which you sang towards the end of your journey confirms to us that you are resting well. One of your last songs was: “Jesus enyi nke obi m, bia noro m nso mgbe nile enyi nke obi m; o buru n’inoro m nso mgbe nile, O ga-adiri anyi mma”. You sang this to all of us your children both those with you physically and virtually. We will continue to sing as you’ve shown us. We will not let you down.

I would like to end this tribute with a favourite quote of yours - “shall we accept good things from God without receiving bad?” (Job 2:10). This was one of your quotes to us when you want to counsel us and encourage us. That moment when I saw your stiff body, I wept profusely but then I remembered this quote that you always said to us, and I got comfort. The Lord giveth, the Lord taketh, May His name forever be praised.

Mummy, rest thee well. No more pain. I know you are resting on the right hand side of your maker, singing in your sonorous voice, the type required in heaven. We will not mourn like those who don’t have hope & faith, but we are rejoicing for we know you are in heaven and pleading our course. You shall continue to be remembered by the works you have done - woman of peace, onye nchikota, home builder, gaa ije gi nke oma. Your legacies stand you out, they are just too many. The type of children you have, underscores who you were. We will all die. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will”. Chuck Palahniuk (2003): Diary.


Rest In Peace, mum till we meet to part no more.

Dr Goodluck Chinonyerem Obi
Son

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Posted by Goodluck Obi on April 29, 2021
Precious in the sights of the Lord is the death of his saints. Psalm 116:15

O death! Where is thy sting? If only money could buy life, mummy you would have been alive today.
Diamond mother, you have left a great void too difficult to fill. I lack words to describe you and the kind of mother you were. My siblings and I owe a lot of whatever we’ve become to you. You were a rare gem, an epitome of motherhood, you guided us your children (biological and others) aright in the love and fear of God. Your tutelage was outstanding both as a professional teacher, mother and home maker. Growing up, you shared work (domestic chores) for us (including the many wards in your home), after which you will announce results for us every week. You were a great disciplinarian, who was an ardent believer of the saying “spare the rod and spoil the child”. Kai mummy, your cane and flogging no get part two o! Those night flogging when we had gone astray, they did wonders on us. We all learnt how to be responsible very early in life. You were accused of training your male children and wards like women - mummy we thank you for this “feminine” training you gave us and we are deeply grateful. The society is better off for that.

You thought us to be nice and kind to people. You thought us to forgive people easily, even those who are after and against us. You taught us to render no man evil for evil (Roman 12:17). You will always say “were ezi ihe merie ihe ojoo”. “Lie low and say nothing” was a quote you always used for us whenever we wanted to react like the youths we are. I do not remember any one that was your enemy. You never told us to avoid anyone or don’t go to anybody’s house because that person is/was your enemy. There will always be misunderstanding in human interactions and relationships and you always chose the path of peace and reconciliation. Mummy, you were an epitome of Christianity.

Mummy you were full of wisdom. Told us stories that molded us. Above all, your sense of humour was next to none. You led us early to the church - from Sunday school in the ACM, to Choir, to AYF and even in adulthood you continued to monitor us. One of the best birthday gifts I got in my life was from you, mum - I can’t forget the Igbo Bible you gave me on my birthday in 1979. Thank you so much. I cherish that igbo Bible. You thought me Abu 215 and Abu 279 as a kid. I love those hymns and will always remember you whenever and wherever I hear or sing them. The lyrics are so soothing and on point. Mummy you thought us many psalms including but not limited to Psalm 130, 121, 23, 91 amongst others. Again thank you.

Mummy your story is full of lessons and emulations. Despite your numerous challenges at different stages of your life, you found a way to navigate and made a success and envy of it all. From childhood, you did not allow your poliomyelitis challenge to bring you down. Despite this challenge and being a girl child, you still actualised your destiny to becoming a headmistress of repute, a teacher par excellence. Mummy, we took this “never say never” attitude of yours. You always reminded us, that we can do all things through Christ who strengthened us. Phil 4:13.

As a wife, you loved and respected your husband till death. You remained loyal and faithful despite all. For many years when your husband was away developing himself educationally (which I believe was a mutual agreement) from Alvan Ikoku, to NYSC in Gboko Benue state, to the University of Nigeria Nsukka (UNN) and to all the other places subsequently, you held forth the home front which included many wards and relations in addition to your children. Mummy, God has blessed you.

Mummy, you loved singing. Any one who knows you and comes close to you will always pick one song or the other from you. Your voice remained sonorous even till death, how then can we not be choristers with good voices? In fact your last days were full of singing. The way and manner in which you sang towards the end of your journey confirms to us that you are resting well. One of your last songs was: “Jesus enyi nke obi m, bia noro m nso mgbe nile enyi nke obi m; o buru n’inoro m nso mgbe nile, O ga-adiri anyi mma”. You sang this to all of us your children both those with you physically and virtually. We will continue to sing as you’ve shown us. We will not let you down.

I would like to end this tribute with a favourite quote of yours - “shall we accept good things from God without receiving bad?” (Job 2:10). This was one of your quotes to us when you want to counsel us and encourage us. That moment when I saw your stiff body, I wept profusely but then I remembered this quote that you always said to us, and I got comfort. The Lord giveth, the Lord taketh, May His name forever be praised.

Mummy, rest thee well. No more pain. I know you are resting on the right hand side of your maker, singing in your sonorous voice, the type required in heaven. We will not mourn like those who don’t have hope & faith, but we are rejoicing for we know you are in heaven and pleading our course. You shall continue to be remembered by the works you have done - woman of peace, onye nchikota, home builder, gaa ije gi nke oma. Your legacies stand you out, they are just too many. The type of children you have, underscores who you were. We will all die. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will”. Chuck Palahniuk (2003): Diary.


Rest In Peace, mum till we meet to part no more.

Dr Goodluck Chinonyerem Obi
Son
her Life
BIRTH AND EARLY CHILDHOOD
I was born in the year 1936 to late Mr. David Esonwune Echendu and Mrs. Janet Uzoahia Echendu of Mbara Ezihe Mbano Imo State. I never knew her mother because she died while i was a baby. I was nurtured by my father, who fed me with sweet palm wine in place of breast milk. When i grew older, he introduced other food necessary for the development of a child. My father taught me our Lord's prayer, 'Azu Ndu,' a famous Christian and language literature of those days, and how to read the Bible.

CHILDHOOD CHALLENGES AND EDUCATION
At the age of five i was afflicted with polio myelitis, which affected one of my legs. My father conveyed me to a hospital in Emekuku which was managed by an European Doctor. The journey was on the bicycle. The hospital workers tried their best. There were times they came to Anara and my father would take me there for treatment.
At the age of sis, I was enrolled in a Central School Anara. I also started Church activities at Christ Church Ezihe (Now the Cathedral Church of Christ), where i picked interest in singing in the church. I was also appointed the presenter in the school from the junior class to the senior level. Despite my physical challenge, i performed in concerts and took top positions in recitations. I also read Bible lessons in church on Children's harvest Sundays. I was made the Secretary of the Girl's Guild Church, Ezihe. I had my standard 6 Leaving Certificate in the year 1949.
I must specially appreciate Mrs. Mabel Osuji (who i call 'nne m ukwu'), the wife of late Archdeacon Osuji, and other who assisted me daily in carrying my school bag on my way to and from school while the polio attack became severe. I will forever remain grateful. May God reward her abundantly.
CALL TO TEACHING
Because I could not get admission into the secondary school due to challenges, I enrolled into Domestic Science Abayi Umuocham Aba where i studied and got Domestic Certificate in 1950. In 1951, I was deployed to Mmirima Primary School to each illiterate women Our Lord's Prayer, the Bible and 'Azu Ndu.' Based on the excellent results of my students I was highly commended. This formally marked the beunnung of my teaching profession.

In 1952, I was transferred to Umunkwo Central School, Mbano, where i replaced a woman teaching on a maternity leave. In 1953 I was redeployed to Amaraku Central School where I was registered as a Probation Teacher (P.T). I was there for four years as an Assistance Teacher (A.T).
I later enrolled in Ezeoke Women Training Centre for further studies and training. In 1960 Ezeoke Women Training Centre was changed to a Girl's Secondary School. So, we were transferred to Akabo Women Training Centre to conclude our studies.
In 1961, I was a Higher Elentary teaching at Eziama Central School, After serving for a few month, i was transferred to Central School, Okohia, which much later became my marital home. In 1963, I was posted to St.Peter's Umukaku Central School, where I met Sir Innocent Ebere Obi, and we later got married.
In the same year (1963), my father died, SirInnocent Obi had more interest in me. In 1964 I returned to Central School Okohia. Still as a single lady, I was later transferred to to Central School Eziama in 1966 on request of my inlaw, late Sir L.U Onuoha. This was to assist in taking care of my sick elder sister, late Mrs, Bernice Onuoha, and her Children.
In 1969, my husband and i moved to Central School Okohia where we taught in a hiding place because of the civil war. I and my husband were living with some of my late sister's children, including Kingsley who was nine months. My husband helped me to nurse that baby, who eventually grew up to know me as his mother. After the war, we were later transferred to Umunachi, Osuama.
In 1975, we were transferred home, that was shortly after the death in1974 of my father-inlaw, late Mr. Godfrey Onwuzuruike Obi. I was posted to Central School Umunchi. By this time we had completed our new home at Umuokparadibia. I was going for teaching from our new house.
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY
In 1976, my sister's sickness became very serious and she died, leaving a new-born baby. I lost hope and was dismayed. However, God took control, Shortly After, Sir Obi Started coming to ask for my hand in marriage through my people at Ezihe. After some initial resistance, my uncle, late Rev. Timothy A. Echendu accepted. This period was turbulent with the threat of the Biafran war. In 1968 the civil war finally broke out. In the course of the civil war which lasted for about three years, Sir Obi wedded me at St. Michael's Church, Okohia.
After the war was over, our union produced four children, two boys and two girls. We named our first child Peace Chisara Ngozichukwu. The second was christened Goodluck Chinonyerem Ahamefule. The third child was named Ezinwa Magnus Chinemerem while the last was named Oluchi Beauty Chigekwu. By the special grace of God, they are all graduates, married and with children.
POSITIONS OF RESPONSIBILITIES HELD
I taught for 10 years in Central School Umunchi. It was in this year that I was voted the Secretary of St. Michael's Church Women's Meeting, in the then Anara Parish. I also enrolled in the Christian Mother and Guild and got actively involved in their meeting. This period, I also laid the foundation of Umunwofor Women meeting. This period, I was fully involved in all church activities, meetings, choir, as a presenter in ST. Michael's Church, reading Bible lessons weekly and mothering Sundays. As a secretary of St. Michael's Women Home and Abroad meeting, I helped register this meeting, opened a Bank Account where our savings were deposited.
I am very grateful to God for his mercies, grace and favour concerning me and my family. I appreciate God especially for making me turn 80 years. I say, may His name be glorified, I appreciate my husband, all my children and the entire family for their support and kindness. In fact, if I have an option of marrying again, I would still choose to marry into Obi's family.
I will not end this writing without singing my favorite hymn. "Jesus for me:"

1

Jesus, my Savior, is all things to me;
Oh, what a wonderful Savior is He,
Guiding, protecting, o’er life’s rolling sea,
Mighty Deliv’rer—Jesus for me. Jesus for me,
  Jesus for me,
All the time everywhere,
    Jesus for me.

2
Jesus in sickness, and Jesus in health,
Jesus in poverty, comfort or wealth;
Sunshine or tempest, whatever it be,
He is my safety—Jesus for me.

3
He is my Refuge, my Rock, and my Tower,
He is my Fortress, my Strength and my Pow’r;
Life everlasting, my Daysman is He,
Blessed Redeemer—Jesus for me.

4
He is my Prophet, my Priest and my King,
He is my Bread of Life, Fountain and Spring;
Bright Sun of Righteousness, Daystar is He,
Horn of Salvation—Jesus for me.

5
Jesus in sorrow, in joy, or in pain,
Jesus my Treasure in loss or in gain;
Constant Companion where’er I may be,
Living or dying—Jesus for me.

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