ForeverMissed

Welcome to this memorial website created to honor Frank Logue. 

All are invited to a Memorial Celebration of Frank Logue and his life 

3:00 p.m. April 30, 2011

at New Haven City Hall, 165 Church Street, New Haven, Connecticut

A reunion of the Logue campaigns and administration will be held Friday evening, April 29th, 5:30 pm at the East Rock Elks Lodge, 87 Webster Street (corner of Dixwell) in downtown New Haven.

Please use the Contact Nancy button (below right) to RSVP to the Memorial Celebration and/or reunion. 

Use the Tribute section below or Stories section of this website to share your reminiscences about this multi-faceted man.  You are also welcome to submit images to the Gallery section. 

Donations in honor of Frank Logue may be made to:

National Urban Fellows, an organization he founded in 1969:  www.nuf.org/support-us

or

LEAP, an academic and social enrichment program for children in New Haven:  www.leapforkids.org/Content/Support_Us.asp

Posted by Sheila Burke on August 19, 2017
I remember his kind and calm demeanour as a child in Trumbull, CT before became mayor of New Haven. He was an influence on my young life. Rest in peace.
Posted by Charles Parks on December 31, 2016
I will always remember that Frank Logue had it right when he created the National Urban Fellows Program.  ... not to compete with the current NUF program, which is a modification of Frank Logue's program, but I do wish I had a copy of Frank's program to share with an institution that wants to establish a program similar to the original NUF program.
Posted by Charles Parks on August 18, 2016
I was in the third class of the National Urban Fellows (NUF). This program was a fascinating creation and I personally benefitted from it immensly. I will always remember Frank Logue.
Posted by Charles Parks on January 1, 2015
Frank will always be remembered by me as a realy great guy.
Posted by Shawn Logue on August 18, 2011
My grandfather, my friend. I miss him every day. But I know that he is still with me, and that he is still present in so many ways.

Happy Birthday, Poppy!
Posted by Charles Parks on March 31, 2011
Unforgettable …

The Honorable Frank Logue is one of the most unforgettable persons that have been my distinct honor to have known. I first met Frank Logue in San Francisco, California during the '72–'73 National Urban Fellows competition.
Posted by ed and doris zelinsky on March 24, 2011
Frank was a wonderful mentor to a dedicated group of young, Yale linked New Haven politicos. We look forward to joining you on April 30. Sincerely, Ed and Doris Zelinsky
Posted by Caroline Logue on March 23, 2011
This is a befitting quotation for my Father-in-law by Albert Pine - "What we do for ourselves dies with us' "What we do for others and the world remains and is immortal" Love,Caroline

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Sheila Burke on August 19, 2017
I remember his kind and calm demeanour as a child in Trumbull, CT before became mayor of New Haven. He was an influence on my young life. Rest in peace.
Posted by Charles Parks on December 31, 2016
I will always remember that Frank Logue had it right when he created the National Urban Fellows Program.  ... not to compete with the current NUF program, which is a modification of Frank Logue's program, but I do wish I had a copy of Frank's program to share with an institution that wants to establish a program similar to the original NUF program.
Posted by Charles Parks on August 18, 2016
I was in the third class of the National Urban Fellows (NUF). This program was a fascinating creation and I personally benefitted from it immensly. I will always remember Frank Logue.
Recent stories

A National Urban Fellow

Shared by Charles Parks on August 18, 2014

I was in the NUF Class of 72 - 73 and shared a great relationship with Frank Logue ... being a Fellow added significant values in my professional career (law enforcement) through  retirement as a police commander; post retirement as a water commissioner; year long foreman of the Los Angeles County Civil Grand Jury, and numerous other boards and community activities ... I will forever remember Frank

New York Times article, 2003

Shared by Jenny Logue on April 22, 2011

Following up

By Joseph P. FriedPublished: February 16, 2003

At 78, Still Bridging The Town-Gown Divide

As mayor of New Haven from 1976 to 1979, Frank Logue had both town and gown in his politics.

A 1948 Yale graduate who also earned a law degree at the university, he was a liberal reformer in New Haven's Democratic politics who twice bucked the party machine and won primaries that led to his election as mayor. Yale-connected liberals were a big part of his constituency. He lost his primary race for a third two-year term.

His agenda included increasing City Hall's role in strengthening cultural programs throughout New Haven. His administration promoted and financed groups from visual artists to a troupe of mimes.

Today, Mr. Logue, 78 and a retired labor arbitrator, is still engaged on the local cultural scene. He is a leader of a nonprofit theater group, the Elm Shakespeare Company, which puts on free summer performances in a park. He previously ran a book-discussion program, often featuring Yale professors, at a local church.

As for town-gown relations over all, they are better today than in his own mayoral days, he said last week from his New Haven home, because Yale officials now recognize their responsibilities to the city. ''They really understand, as they never used to,'' he said, ''that they're the biggest enterprise in the entire city.''

Letter to the sports Editor, NY Times

Shared by Jenny Logue on April 22, 2011

A Great Player, A Great Man

Published: May 21, 1989

A further remembrance of Lou Gehrig.

Kids in Philadelphia rooting for the Athletics in the late 1930's found few consolations at Shibe Park. We were too young to recall the glory days of Foxx, Grove and Simmons in 1929, '30 and '31. All the heroes and legends we watched played for the visiting teams: Bob Feller of the Indians, Hank Greenberg of the Tigers and all of those mighty Yankees: DiMaggio, Keller, Dickey, Ruffing, and of course Lou Gehrig.

One Sunday in 1938 I went to a doubleheader and watched the Yanks beat the A's in the first as usual. Between the games, after the ground crew dragged the infield, Lou Gehrig and Dick Siebert, the A's young first baseman, went out to first base. Gehrig demonstrated to Siebert a first baseman's footwork. He stood off the bag and fielded imaginary pegs from second, short and third, high and low, to one side and the other, letting the appropriate foot ease back to the bag.

I admired Siebert for letting the home folks see that a major league player was willing to be instructed in public. I was awed by Gehrig -powerful yet graceful - and generous enough to give lessons to the other team's first baseman.

The A's lost the second game, too, but I learned some things about what makes a good first baseman and a great man.

FRANK LOGUE New Haven