ForeverMissed
FRANK WRIGHT, 87, artist and educator, died peacefully on August 9, 2020 at his home in Washington, DC, of natural causes. In his seven-decade, prolific career as a painter, printmaker, and educator, he created over 220 works of art. Frank truly lived his passions. His life was one of art and beauty, unbound curiosity, tremendous intensity and drive, humor and wit, profound generosity and fellowship, and a deep love of family. 

Frank is survived by his wife, Mary Dow Wright; daughter Suzanne Wright; son-in-law Rustin Quaide; granddaughter Adrianna Quaide; sister Rosalind Wright Duckett, brother-in-law John Duckett, and nieces and nephew Chris Duckett, Sarah Duckett, Mary Duckett-Dolinger, and Rebecca Leach. 

A memorial service will be held in Spring 2021.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Frank Wright Young Artist Fund, National Society of Arts and Letters, Washington, DC Chapter (NSAL-DC). 

To make a donation online visit www.GoFundMe.com/FrankWright-YoungArtist

Posted by Alex Meredith on October 10, 2020
From looking over the many other postings and comments about Frank’s life, the unmistakable themes are those that extoll his art, his teaching, his mentorship and his love of his family. I could add my enthusiastic endorsement of each of those as well. However, few people outside myself (and perhaps his friend Dr. Richard Restak) could know of Frank’s impact on science and medicine. Of this, I think he would be proud, too, because of his deep interest in human anatomy and admiration for the merging of art and science by visionaries like da Vinci, Brunelleschi and Piranesi. Let me explain.

In the autumn of 1976 I took Frank’s figure drawing class at George Washington University. I remember that there were about 25 of us in the class, and that Frank had a way of making himself available to students to be able to get to know them by more than just their seat location. In my case, I learned that if I showed up early for the evening class, I could help him re-position the chairs in the studio, after which we would move to his nearby office for conversation until time for class. During those sessions, Frank would always find a way to engage me, to plumb my interests, and then pull out innumerable books to illustrate how a particular master rendered some feature of interest. I became comfortable talking with him like I’d never done with any other professor before, and I’m sure I said my share of youthful dumb things. In class, assignments involved sketching from the model followed by a critique of those efforts. Students would arrange their drawings near the model stand and Frank would pass from one to another while providing instructive commentary. Because this was a beginning figure drawing course, many of the efforts were (by my youthful perspective) appalling. But this pattern of sketch-and-critique occurred for session after session. One day, during one of our now-routine pre-class conversations, I blurted out my low opinion of the “quality” of many of our drawings and asked Frank how he psychologically dealt with seeing all these seriously bad drawings day after day? His thoughtful reply has stuck with me for the rest of my life. He said that sure, it is easy to point out the mistakes or ugly efforts. But in doing that, it would be stating the obvious and, most likely, the student knew that the image was unsuccessful too. On the other hand, if he could find just one small component of each drawing that was successful, and emphasize that feature, the student could also learn what worked and would be encouraged to repeat it. Over time, this process of slowly accumulating small successes would sum to learning, experience and much better drawing. 

This was a revelation to me and it succinctly described a method to teach the acquisition of expert performance. It should be no surprise then, that this teaching philosophy has stood at the core of my anatomy courses for over 40 years of medical, dental and science students at my university. Especially in laboratory settings, the expression of a novice student upon learning that they had done something well is both satisfying and rewarding.  As is the reassurance that the student will carry forward that observation or insight further into their professional practice to the benefit of their patients. By my estimation, over the years at least 5000 doctors have been the beneficiaries of Frank’s “identify successful effort” approach to teaching. Needless to say, in addition to his paintings, etchings and engravings that hang in my house, Frank walks with me every day into my classroom.
Happy Birthday Frank!
Posted by Michael Schwartz on October 3, 2020
I was introduced to Frank by Taba Dale perhaps20 plus years ago who knew that both Frank and I shared interest in the American Civil War. At the time I was the President of Board of the Philadelphia Civil Library & Museum.

We shared our historical knowledge and interest over the years through lunches at various locations around DC-MD. I got to see many of Frank's wonderful paintings of various Civil War subjects which eventually had me working with Frank and friend at GW in putting together a hard bound book of his Civil War paintings.
Michael Schwartz
Bethesda, MD
email: schmas @ aol.com
Posted by William Fleishell on September 29, 2020
Frank was a voice of reason and wisdom. He was my drawing teacher at GWU when I started as an apprentice picture engraver back in 1988.After I graduated he would let me draw in his classes- but I had to bring my work in and talk about it. It was always fascinating to talk with Frank about local DC history- we both have family backgrounds here going way back and he even discovered some things about my GG grandpa in one of ancient newspaper files he found that someone had tossed out from the DC public library. I can see Frank now in my mind's eye climbing into the library dumpster retrieving these old gigantic heavily bound newspaper books comprising a years worth of newspapers from the 1850's. Later I posed as a Confederate soldier in Frank's Chattanooga battle painting- I'm lying dead on the ground in two poses and I'm a sharpshooter firing at Union troops in another part of the painting. It was a fun little diversion. Frank always had great advice and insights and we will all miss his wonderful spirit and humor greatly.
Posted by Judith Howells on September 12, 2020
Fate brought me to Frank's first GW drawing class (1970-71) and his 2D and 3D design classes that year. I had arrived at GW for graduate school with a degree in Art History and more than a year of teaching, , but was inadequately prepared to take on a studio art curriculum at the graduate level.

Our drawing class models included a nursing mother and Mr. Dioro , a homeless man he found walking in front of the doughnut shop below his studio. Frank set high standards and within a few weeks, I had drawn the FBI building from life, spent a day at the zoo drawing birds and hours in the train station drawing trains in perspective! That December, our class took a field trip to Pennsylvania in order to meet J Lessing Rosenwald and view his personal collection of drawings and prints. We passed around original Durer prints and a red chalk Rembrandt drawing.

Frank's design classes included an intro to calligraphy, perspective drawing, an assignment to make a model of a toy , create a "found object", and learning how to lay 14K gold leaf. We also made 3D paper sculpture and a model of a street scene. That I remember this 50 years later gives testament to what an inspiring teacher he was! 

Although life got in the way and I left GW the following summer, Frank encouraged me to continue my education "before life got in the way". I finally heeded that his advise and I also kept in touch.

This September would have marked 50 years of friendship. I can honestly say I am profoundly influenced by the time he shared one the years: studio visits, lunches, and even a visit to the National Gallery. He was generous with information about painting , drawing, art, history and DC . He spoke with pride of his daughter, his son in law, his granddaughter and had praise for his students.  Additionally he taught respect for materials , the necessity of self discipline, and a deep appreciation for traditional drawing and mark making. He shared his family and welcomed mine, and I am profoundly grateful for the gift of his friendship and his remarkable generosity of spirit.
Posted by Connie Springer on September 6, 2020
I had Frank as a teacher at the Corcoran School of Art in conjunction with GWU in 1966. In a drawing class with him, I was inspired and encouraged. I thought art would be my career, and now in retirement I've become a painter. I always wondered if he were related to Frank Lloyd Wright, with a similar name and reminiscent face. I wish I could have known him better.
Posted by Jerry Rusnock on September 5, 2020
Frank was a great human being, a Renaissance man and a wonderful soul. He was a Humanist, an awesome artist, an outstanding professor and a brilliant art historian. He had an enormous positive impact on my art, my outlook and my life.

His works will be remembered for their timeless and serene beauty. Frank took the time to share of his prodigious gifts with multiple generations of art students and has significantly influenced the art of our time.

I have never enjoyed such absorbing and illuminating educational experiences as those I had when I attended Frank’s drawing classes at the Corcoran School. He provided the keys to classical skills and new capabilities for his students. At the same time, he opened doors to critical insights and offered a coherent vision of aesthetic tradition and wonder.

He will be sorely missed.
Posted by Albert Nekimken on September 4, 2020
Unfortunately, I only got to know Frank during the past ten years or so when I modeled for his drawing classes at GWU. However, during that short time we established a real friendship based on our mutual interests in art and teaching. Frank was generous with his praise and with his time, demonstrating always his passion for art and his disdain for hokkum. He was a good friend and I only regret that we couldn't persuade him to retire earlier to have more time with his beloved family.
Posted by Eric Bornschlegl on September 4, 2020
I met Frank in 1980'ish at GW. For what ever reason he took a liking to me, a country boy from Nebraska. Mary and Frank were both very kind to me, they are my parents age so they sorta took me in. Frank, myself and two other men (for the life of me I can't remember their names) got together often, played cribbage, drank beer, ate monkfish and solved most of the problems of the world. We even had a name for our little group, The Stallion's. Such fond memories being invited to Frank and Mary's home for home cooked food and out to Frank's dads home on Chesapeake bay, liming around. I have been blessed having been able to call Frank my friend.
Posted by Don Pricer on September 3, 2020
I met Frank when, after the Air Force, I decided to pursue a career in art in 1970. Frank impressed me right away with his love of life and friendship. I wanted to BE him, I guess. Too bad I wasn't HALF the talent! He turned-out to be one of the seminal personalities of my lifetime. He and his sweet wife, Mary were very generous to me, and often had me visit in their home in Chevy Chase. 
Rest in peace my dear friend. <3
Posted by Margaret Weiss on September 3, 2020
I first met Frank Wright when I was maybe 12 or 13 years old. He was formidable and funny. Over the years, I slowly gained an appreciation for just what an amazing person and artist he was. Really, Suzanne was (and still is) just one of my best friends ever but you can't know Suzanne and NOT know Frank and Mary to some degree, right? Frank Wright was passionate about what he did and I believe someday the world is going to recognize him as one of the finest American painters of his time. He was fascinating, his work is breathtaking, and just knowing some of him has made my life richer. Lots of love to Mary and Suzanne, two formidable and funny women. 
Posted by David E Balducchi on September 3, 2020
Our deepest sympathy to Mary, Suzanne, and family for the loss of an extraordinary husband, father, artist, and educator, Frank Wright.  I first met Frank in the late 1970s through my good friend Jim Muell. Frank had an infectious enthusiasm that engaged everyone he met. During lunch hour I sometimes would walk past the LeDroit Building. Frank would see me and motion me up to his studio. During those conversations, I would gaze upon his latest art project as he vividly described it. One time I told Frank that I was headed to a Civil War reenactment. He asked me to photograph the reenactment for him, which I did. Frank later used some of the images to inspire a battlefield painting. In May 2014, Frank, Jim Muell and I attended a special program on Civil War Era wet-plate photography at the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office. Frank so enjoyed the outing. It would be one of our last joint excursions.  Deborah and I express our sincere sorrow and prayers. 
David E. Balducchi
Posted by James Muell on September 3, 2020
I met Frank Wright the day I registered at George Washington University. I was interested in Economics, which I registered for and the office assigned me to Frank as my advisor. A short walk over to is office in the Art building intending to change majors from Art to Economics - I needed his signature to change majors. I thought I would be there for 3 minutes but he instisted I sit down and tell him why Economics? In 2 or 3 hours there in his office Frank convinced me to take his drawing class. The next semester I changed my major to Art. After a year or 2 in his class I change my major.  Somewhere in the next 2 years, Frank introduced my to Wang Ming who owned a Framing Business and I got a job taking frame orders and helping to make frames. Wang Ming wanted to retire and he offer me to purchase the business from him.
  Being single Frank would invite me to his house for dinner where I met Mary and Suzanne. I had many more invitations. 
  One year Frank asked and conjolled me to go to France with Mary and Suzanne. We went toured Paris and ate well! Mary and Suzanne returned to the States and Frank and I went on to Naples by train(?). On arrival we found a small hotel late in the day. Frank went out for something and came back smiling saying he met another traveler, a Carol. He insisted we three go to dinner. We learned she was traveling alone, and Frank quickely invited her to come along siteseeing in Naples. It was a short stay in Naples but long enough for me to fall in love and ask Carol to marry me. On the last day I bought her a ring she saw in a store window.    
Posted by Nan Raphael on September 3, 2020
I met Frank around 1980 through my folks who purchased a few of his paintings from the Kennedy Gallery. They asked me to connect them with Frank so I did and the result was a beautiful friendship. I made frequent visits to his studio on F St and E St where I really enjoyed our visits..sharing our love of art, DC history and the Washington Football team. I loved seeing his works in progress. He had such passion for his craft and it showed. He has left all of us with so many beautiful gifts one of which is in my living room. May he rest in peace.
Posted by M. Stephen Doherty on September 3, 2020
I visited Frank's studio many times in the 1980s and always enjoyed seeing his latest paintings and hearing about promising young artists he thought should be profiled in the art magazines I edited. He was a great story teller, gifted artist, dedicated teacher, and good friend. Rest in peace Frank.
Posted by Amy Millen on September 3, 2020
His exhibition at the Cosmos Club was loved by all. It was such an honor to have his work and to meet him. He was a great man and artist. Amy Millen
Posted by Judith Mathewson on September 3, 2020
I'm sorry I didn't know him. He sounds extraordinary, and I love your description of him, Suzanne. He must have been so proud of you and I bet he took great delight in Adrianna.
Posted by Suzanne Wright on September 3, 2020
While I am feeling a great loss, I am also comforted and heartened that my father had such long and robust life.

I am also profoundly grateful for the many, many gifts he gave me -- curiosity, creativity, intensity, perseverance, humor, and a love of family and friends to name a few. And then there's art. From a very young age, my dad taught me to see with an artist eye as well as how to draw trees, designs, 3-D letters, and a landscape with a horizon line. My father, mother, and their community lived through art and beauty, and art lived through them, and through me.

I am so appreciative of your remembrances of my dad as teacher, friend and artist. My father's tremendous capacity to share artistic experiences with others was such a transformative gift to me. It has fueled my passion and purpose, as an art museum educator, artist, and now, guiding art and wellness programs and coaching.

One of my dad's most wonderful legacies, of course, is his art. In the times we are living in, it is such a pleasure--and a relief--to be transported into one of his beautiful landscapes or narrative paintings.
Posted by Patrick Farmer on September 2, 2020
Sfumato- “without lines or borders, in the manner of smoke or beyond the focus plane"

A concept of art Professor Wright taught that has resonated with me throughout the 25 years knowing him. Not unlike the many looooong conversations we had in his office just outside his GW classroom... Professor would sample a “verbal” form of Sfumato with me often. He’d begin a story, I’d listen carefully, he would begin to create a visual through his words, I’d start to drift, then refocus, I’d smile because his smile would be part of his reminiscences, I’d drift again lol, then refocus... then finally the speaking would end. And, I knew he just got finished telling me a lot, some of the profundity was caught, but more than I wished flew through my ears to be caught in the ether (undiagnosed ADHD on my part maybe lol)

What did we even really talk about, what was said? I didnt fully know all the time, but knew my Mentor had me captivated, enthralled, in wonder. He created a mood, an anticipation, a feeling, a lesson of patience to an impatient student, but always left me feeling full. I was lucky enough to experience many of these talks and felt the comfort of home.

I stopped by handful of times over the years expecting to always see him Either teaching or in his office, door open, always ready and willing to strike up a conversation. Just before graduation, My father met him and later my son as the stages of life progressed. Years later a classmate of mine and student of his crossed paths. 20 years removed from those halls of creativity, we shared only the most loving experiences and incredible art lessons bestowed on us by our Professor.

Professor, oh how you will be missed and I feel honored to exist even on the fringes of the vast number of family and friends you have blessed with your energy and existence. You were THE art teacher for me, an unexpected but welcomed life teacher and beyond that a FRIEND.

I Love You Professor
Posted by Lila Asher on September 2, 2020
He was a fine artists, a fine man and a fine friend
 Lila Oliver Asher
Posted by Steve Brusatte on September 2, 2020
Rest in peace Frank. I will always remember our one meeting (arranged by Chris) at the Cosmos Club. What a special afternoon with wonderful company. You were so kind and generous to my family.
Posted by Chris Brusatte on September 2, 2020
Frank was such a kind and wonderful man, and I just treasure so much the relationship that he and Mary had with my entire family, and how much love and generosity they showed me when I was a young student and professional living in DC. He and Mary treated me, my brothers, and my parents like their own family, opening up their lives to us and taking care of me and being the most dear friend. I have so many wonderful memories of my time in DC, and I will always treasure Frank’s friendship as he always will be remembered and live through me. God bless a great man and a great family. Sending so many prayers.
Posted by George Voris on September 1, 2020
Frank was an inspiring person in my life. We met at his classic studio in the LeDroit building in a neighborhood that had some risks but great charm. Frank knew everyone on the street and painted some of them. We had many lunches in Chinatown and his Cosmos club. He shared his love of the city and history and I am grateful that he has preserved the city through his works.  In an era when few buildings even statues are permanent his paintings have become a record that will last. I thank God for the many years we knew each other and extend condolences to his family.  
Posted by Marian Osher on September 1, 2020
I am grateful for the friendship, mentorship and profound influence that Frank has had on my life and my art. He taught me how to see and draw. He taught me how to explore the visual world through observation and research, and how to enjoy the process of making art as a way of life. I was one of many students who benefited from his guidance. He made each of us feel special. He set very high standards for his students, but he helped each of us to achieve our best with his loving kindness, support and knowledge. I have kept in touch with Frank and his lovely wife Mary for many years and their friendship has truly been a blessing. I will always cherish Frank's warmth, humor, generosity and humanity.
Posted by Thomas Hipschen on August 31, 2020
Frank's friendship provided a profound and lasting influence on the course of my entire life. His encyclopedic knowledge of printmaking in general and love for the difficult art of engraving energized and focused the perception of my career path at a difficult and formative moment. He welcomed me into his studio and family when I was in my late teens and separated from my own family by a great distance. I will be forever grateful for the incredible gift of fate that brought us together at that moment in time and the subsequent experience of fifty years of his generosity and friendship. I remain mindful that I am just one of the thousands of students who benefited from his exceptional tutelage.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Alex Meredith on October 10, 2020
From looking over the many other postings and comments about Frank’s life, the unmistakable themes are those that extoll his art, his teaching, his mentorship and his love of his family. I could add my enthusiastic endorsement of each of those as well. However, few people outside myself (and perhaps his friend Dr. Richard Restak) could know of Frank’s impact on science and medicine. Of this, I think he would be proud, too, because of his deep interest in human anatomy and admiration for the merging of art and science by visionaries like da Vinci, Brunelleschi and Piranesi. Let me explain.

In the autumn of 1976 I took Frank’s figure drawing class at George Washington University. I remember that there were about 25 of us in the class, and that Frank had a way of making himself available to students to be able to get to know them by more than just their seat location. In my case, I learned that if I showed up early for the evening class, I could help him re-position the chairs in the studio, after which we would move to his nearby office for conversation until time for class. During those sessions, Frank would always find a way to engage me, to plumb my interests, and then pull out innumerable books to illustrate how a particular master rendered some feature of interest. I became comfortable talking with him like I’d never done with any other professor before, and I’m sure I said my share of youthful dumb things. In class, assignments involved sketching from the model followed by a critique of those efforts. Students would arrange their drawings near the model stand and Frank would pass from one to another while providing instructive commentary. Because this was a beginning figure drawing course, many of the efforts were (by my youthful perspective) appalling. But this pattern of sketch-and-critique occurred for session after session. One day, during one of our now-routine pre-class conversations, I blurted out my low opinion of the “quality” of many of our drawings and asked Frank how he psychologically dealt with seeing all these seriously bad drawings day after day? His thoughtful reply has stuck with me for the rest of my life. He said that sure, it is easy to point out the mistakes or ugly efforts. But in doing that, it would be stating the obvious and, most likely, the student knew that the image was unsuccessful too. On the other hand, if he could find just one small component of each drawing that was successful, and emphasize that feature, the student could also learn what worked and would be encouraged to repeat it. Over time, this process of slowly accumulating small successes would sum to learning, experience and much better drawing. 

This was a revelation to me and it succinctly described a method to teach the acquisition of expert performance. It should be no surprise then, that this teaching philosophy has stood at the core of my anatomy courses for over 40 years of medical, dental and science students at my university. Especially in laboratory settings, the expression of a novice student upon learning that they had done something well is both satisfying and rewarding.  As is the reassurance that the student will carry forward that observation or insight further into their professional practice to the benefit of their patients. By my estimation, over the years at least 5000 doctors have been the beneficiaries of Frank’s “identify successful effort” approach to teaching. Needless to say, in addition to his paintings, etchings and engravings that hang in my house, Frank walks with me every day into my classroom.
Happy Birthday Frank!
Posted by Michael Schwartz on October 3, 2020
I was introduced to Frank by Taba Dale perhaps20 plus years ago who knew that both Frank and I shared interest in the American Civil War. At the time I was the President of Board of the Philadelphia Civil Library & Museum.

We shared our historical knowledge and interest over the years through lunches at various locations around DC-MD. I got to see many of Frank's wonderful paintings of various Civil War subjects which eventually had me working with Frank and friend at GW in putting together a hard bound book of his Civil War paintings.
Michael Schwartz
Bethesda, MD
email: schmas @ aol.com
Posted by William Fleishell on September 29, 2020
Frank was a voice of reason and wisdom. He was my drawing teacher at GWU when I started as an apprentice picture engraver back in 1988.After I graduated he would let me draw in his classes- but I had to bring my work in and talk about it. It was always fascinating to talk with Frank about local DC history- we both have family backgrounds here going way back and he even discovered some things about my GG grandpa in one of ancient newspaper files he found that someone had tossed out from the DC public library. I can see Frank now in my mind's eye climbing into the library dumpster retrieving these old gigantic heavily bound newspaper books comprising a years worth of newspapers from the 1850's. Later I posed as a Confederate soldier in Frank's Chattanooga battle painting- I'm lying dead on the ground in two poses and I'm a sharpshooter firing at Union troops in another part of the painting. It was a fun little diversion. Frank always had great advice and insights and we will all miss his wonderful spirit and humor greatly.
his Life

Childhood

Frank (John Franklin Wright, Jr.) was born October 10, 1932 in Washington, DC. A fifth-generation Washingtonian, he grew up in Kenilworth, in far North-East DC, with his parents John Franklin Wright, Sr., Margaret Young Wright, and younger sister Rosalind.     

Education

Frank graduated from Eastern High School, DCPS (1950) where he studied with Washington Color School painter Leon Berkowitz. He pursued a robust educational path made possible through scholarships and fellowships. He earned his BA in Fine Arts (1954) from American University, made possible by a scholarship from the National Society of Arts and Letters, Washington, DC Chapter. At AU, he met his wife of 63 years, Mary Dow Wright, and studied with Sarah Baker, Ben Summerford, and Bob Gates. 

He received his MA in Art History (1960) from the University of Illinois under Allen Weller after spending two years of thesis research on fifteenth-century Italian cassone with Bernard Berenson at his Villa I Tatti, outside of Florence, where he and Mary were wed in 1957. Frank was awarded a multi-year Paul J. Sachs Fellowship from the Print Council of America to study printmaking—connoisseurship, history, and practice. He worked with the distinguished print collections (1959—1960) of Lessing J. Rosenwald (at Alverthorpe and the National Gallery of Art) and the Fogg Museum, Harvard University, where he completed curatorial and connoisseurship coursework with John Coolidge. He then spent 3 years learning the craft of printmaking with innovative printmaker William Stanley Hayter at his Paris Atelier 17 (1961—1964). There he focused on two techniques: the meticulous, traditional craft of engraving and the innovative deep-bite etching process, developed by Hayter. 

Return to the U.S. and the Family Paintings

In the mid 1960s, Frank returned to DC and established his studio, resumed teaching, and started a family. While he focused on engraving and deep-bite etching, depicting mostly allegorical subjects, by the late 60s, his young family became increasingly important in his life and art. Frank’s intimate family interiors, such as Suzanne Reading the Funnies, 1974 and The Letter, 1976 marked a renewed focus on oil painting in the spirit of the Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer. 
Recent stories

Frank and Bill

Shared by Robin Woodward Entry on September 3, 2020
I first met Frank when I was about 11 or 12 years old, sixty years ago. I remember my brother Bill Woodward and Frank had a studio across from the National Portrait Gallery. It had been an old row house converted into artists' studios. Frank's studio was a floor below my brother's so I would pop in to say hell-o and watch him paint before I continued the long flight of stairs up to see Billy.  Frank also helped me with my first 'silver-point'. He was always patient with my youthful attempts and unannounced interruptions. 
He and Mary became good friends with my parents and would enjoy wonderful stories and good times together that I longed to hear. 
I'm so sorry to hear of his passing. I will cherish these memories and more.
"May God be between you and harm, and all the empty places".

Thanks for the access

Shared by Suzanne Hill on August 30, 2020
To the most incredible body of work - just amazing.  I look at every single painting.  I had the privilege of taking classes with painters such as Rob Liberace and Danni Dawson and the influence Mr. Wright had is obvious.  They were indeed fortunate to have had him as a teacher.  His paintings in his home setting are extraordinary as are the scenes of downtown Washington.  Thanks to his loving daughter for making the links to all his work accessible - I spent the better part of two hours admiring and absorbing.

Suzanne Hill

My first drawing teacher

Shared by Judith Leep on August 30, 2020
I took Drawing I and II with Mr. Wright at the Corcoran School of Art during the 1967/68 academic year.  I was still a senior in high school in northern Virginia in the mornings and attended drawing classes in the afternoons.  My best memory is making silver point drawings.  He directed us to the school store to get the appropriate claw grip mechanical pencil and an inch of silver wire and then return to the classroom.  More than 50 years later, I still have the pencil and wire, they have always been in the pencil cup on my desk.  I subsequently attended an art school in New England, and without a doubt, Mr. Wright was the most supportive, inspiring and helpful art teacher I ever studied with.  And the kindest.  I will never forget him.

His memory is a blessing.
My deepest sympathy to his family and friends.