ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Harold Weaver. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Juliet Vuilleumier on January 20, 2021
Harold was my grandfather. From childhood, I remember him letting me sit in his recliner as a special treat, with air-popped corn after dinner, served in a dish labeled "pop-corn". As a teen, when I lived in a place that didn't have tv, he mailed me VHS recordings of shows he knew I liked. He remembered my birthday. I remember the hugs, kisses, homemade freezer cookies and fresh chocolates.

I am now almost 40. I have been married twice, and I'm pretty sure as much as Harold loved me, he loved my husbands more. It was annoying, but also a way that solidified their relationships to our family more than I ever could have done without his approval.

He was the great-grandfather to my children, Lora and Sage. I was a very young mother, and he and Eileen were a major part of their early lives. So many days they got to spend with Harold and Eileen, and them shuttling me to my job and babysitting for me. I will never forget the support and love they were able to share with me and the kids in those years. They made what seemed impossible, doable. Giving someone your time is the most valuable and memorable gift, and I am forever in their debt, and I strive to carry on their dedication to service and dedication to loved ones.

I will never forget spending time with them at the Rose Garden, Zoo, waterfalls, wildflowers, camping and hiking. We never spent much time talking about the big stuff in our lives, just being together was enough to say: I care about you. I have the same memories as a young child as I do as an adult with them, the consistency over decades still befuddles me, and glad my own children got the experience of not only their own grandparents, but mine too. Aside from the memory loss, they have been the constant family leaders for my entire life, and we should all be so lucky.

When he was selling/giving away many of their items when moving to a retirement community, we inherited all of their backpacking materials, including an Oregon Tour Book with Eileen's notes in it. I won't go in to the full story now, but let me say what they were able to do as in her words in their forties an "easy two day trip" turned in to a 3 day horrific and painful trip in my thirties, where I gained so much respect for those two crazy hiking lovebirds I call Grandma and Grandpa. (also came to loathe the word "switchback". Paradise Park is NOT what it sounds like)

In the last few years, before my own children moved out on their own, we were doing family Sunday dinner nights at the retirement center. Sometimes eating at the restaurant onsite, sometimes pre-cooking and bringing over a meal to his apartment. I would plan big menus, and bless my husband's heart, he took on the brunt of the actual cooking. As his great-grandchildren were then teenagers, getting that time around meals and puzzles and hearing stories of when Harold and Eileen first met, his history, and our family history beyond that he had found...I will cherish forever.

This should just be about Harold, but the truth is, I know nothing about them other than being a couple. Alzheimer's was devastating. I have been mourning the loss of Eileen for more than 10 years at this point. I have been mourning Harold for a few years, and I knew death was near, and mercy. Still, tonight I cry. I love them both. I will never forget them. And thank you.

Posted by R. Carroll Kenagy on January 19, 2021
Harold was one of the first persons I meet when when I arrived in Portland in 1964.
He & Eileen were lifelong friends.
I enjoyed working for him on many projects.
We celebrated birthdays together every year. Randy our son shares his birthday with Eileen.
Bootise enjoyed making candy with Harold and still uses his helpful hints
he shared.
Harold was a caring person and we'll always treasure our friendship.
Our condolences to Eileen, Cynthia ,Donna and families.
Love,
Carroll & Bootsie
Posted by Donna Adkins on January 17, 2021
To this greatest Father. His love will be missed, as well as his friendship. He cared so much about everyone. He had a great life.

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Posted by Juliet Vuilleumier on January 20, 2021
Harold was my grandfather. From childhood, I remember him letting me sit in his recliner as a special treat, with air-popped corn after dinner, served in a dish labeled "pop-corn". As a teen, when I lived in a place that didn't have tv, he mailed me VHS recordings of shows he knew I liked. He remembered my birthday. I remember the hugs, kisses, homemade freezer cookies and fresh chocolates.

I am now almost 40. I have been married twice, and I'm pretty sure as much as Harold loved me, he loved my husbands more. It was annoying, but also a way that solidified their relationships to our family more than I ever could have done without his approval.

He was the great-grandfather to my children, Lora and Sage. I was a very young mother, and he and Eileen were a major part of their early lives. So many days they got to spend with Harold and Eileen, and them shuttling me to my job and babysitting for me. I will never forget the support and love they were able to share with me and the kids in those years. They made what seemed impossible, doable. Giving someone your time is the most valuable and memorable gift, and I am forever in their debt, and I strive to carry on their dedication to service and dedication to loved ones.

I will never forget spending time with them at the Rose Garden, Zoo, waterfalls, wildflowers, camping and hiking. We never spent much time talking about the big stuff in our lives, just being together was enough to say: I care about you. I have the same memories as a young child as I do as an adult with them, the consistency over decades still befuddles me, and glad my own children got the experience of not only their own grandparents, but mine too. Aside from the memory loss, they have been the constant family leaders for my entire life, and we should all be so lucky.

When he was selling/giving away many of their items when moving to a retirement community, we inherited all of their backpacking materials, including an Oregon Tour Book with Eileen's notes in it. I won't go in to the full story now, but let me say what they were able to do as in her words in their forties an "easy two day trip" turned in to a 3 day horrific and painful trip in my thirties, where I gained so much respect for those two crazy hiking lovebirds I call Grandma and Grandpa. (also came to loathe the word "switchback". Paradise Park is NOT what it sounds like)

In the last few years, before my own children moved out on their own, we were doing family Sunday dinner nights at the retirement center. Sometimes eating at the restaurant onsite, sometimes pre-cooking and bringing over a meal to his apartment. I would plan big menus, and bless my husband's heart, he took on the brunt of the actual cooking. As his great-grandchildren were then teenagers, getting that time around meals and puzzles and hearing stories of when Harold and Eileen first met, his history, and our family history beyond that he had found...I will cherish forever.

This should just be about Harold, but the truth is, I know nothing about them other than being a couple. Alzheimer's was devastating. I have been mourning the loss of Eileen for more than 10 years at this point. I have been mourning Harold for a few years, and I knew death was near, and mercy. Still, tonight I cry. I love them both. I will never forget them. And thank you.

Posted by R. Carroll Kenagy on January 19, 2021
Harold was one of the first persons I meet when when I arrived in Portland in 1964.
He & Eileen were lifelong friends.
I enjoyed working for him on many projects.
We celebrated birthdays together every year. Randy our son shares his birthday with Eileen.
Bootise enjoyed making candy with Harold and still uses his helpful hints
he shared.
Harold was a caring person and we'll always treasure our friendship.
Our condolences to Eileen, Cynthia ,Donna and families.
Love,
Carroll & Bootsie
Posted by Donna Adkins on January 17, 2021
To this greatest Father. His love will be missed, as well as his friendship. He cared so much about everyone. He had a great life.
his Life

Harold Weaver, November 13, 1932-January 11-2021

Harold Leroy Weaver died Monday evening, January 11, 2021, after many happy years spent with his wife and family.  For the last 10 years he had become caregiver to his wife of almost 68 years.  He is survived by his wife, Eileen Marjorie Weaver, and their two daughters Cynthia Lou Weaver (Brian Dahl, Son-In-Law; Julie Vuilleumier, Grandchild; Dylan Dahl, Grandchild; Lora James, Great Grandchild; Sage James, Great Grandchild), and Donna Kay Adkins (Russell Adkins, Son-In-Law).

Harold and Eileen married in February of 1953.  Harold was working for Sears, Roebuck and Company.  Just before their marriage on December 16, 1952, Harold was called to report for Armed Forces Physical Examination.  Harold chose to serve his duty through the Oregon State Selective Services System and on March 6, 1953 was chosen to work at the Eastern Oregon State Hospital in Pendleton, Oregon from March 18, 1953 until March 18, 1955 as a Cook II.  They moved back to Portland and Harold continued his career at Sears, Roebuck and Company, who had paid benefits to Harold during his service.  They bought their first home on NE 68th in Portland on February 9, 1959.  In 1963 Harold and Eileen started a retail drapery sales business under the name of The Weavers Drapery & Installation Service.  Harold then partnered with a couple of different Designers over the course of the next few years and eventually he and Eileen became the owner of Weaver’s Drapery Workroom on 17th and SE Hawthorne, in Portland.  On March 10, 1976, they bought their 2nd home on NE Laurelhurst Place.  There they remained until well past their retirement years. They retired in the summer of 1998.  In the fall of 2014 Harold decided to sell their home and moved to a retirement facility in 2015 where he remained up until his death.

Harold had many passions.  Music, cooking, hiking and photography were his most loved activities.  He never learned to read a note of music, but could hear a song and instantly repeat it on the piano or organ.  He later took up violin and Accordion.  He always had a big smile on his face when he played music.  Harold liked the early hours of work and once their daughters were in school, he would be the one to come home and get dinner cooking for the family.  He loved working in the Kitchen and was always trying new recipes and sharing with other cooks he would come across.  His collection of recipes was vast.  Hiking and photography went hand-in-hand.  Harold and Eileen went many places hiking, backpacking, exploring, camping.  The photography speaks for itself.  His collection of photographs and movies tells the story of their travels with friends and family.

Harold’s greatest passion was for family and family history.  He and Eileen were always very active with their family and holiday gatherings were a big deal for them.  During their retirement, their interests turned to the Mennonite Historical Society, in Canby, Oregon.  Harold performed mailings, gathered information for their family tree, recorded information for various Mennonite Families and, at one point, Harold gave a presentation at Western Mennonite Church to help raise funds for the new Historical Building, that was eventually built on the grounds of the Zion Church.

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