ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Howard Kimball. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Mrs Stanley on October 14, 2020
Such sad news to hear about your Dad Lori. One of my first memories of your father was way back in the early 1970's after my family had recently moved to NH from CT. My mother got into a really bad car accident and a few days later there was a knock on our door and there stood your father with a casserole in his hand. His caring contribution to our time of trauma. It was one of the earliest acts of kindness I remember as a young girl. it was a very kind gesture of your father and really says it all about the person that he was ... very kind and humble with a great sense of humor. I know you all have great memories of your life with him and that hopefully will bring you much peace as you navigate your way forward in life without him. Sending lots of love your way Lori and my condolences to your family .
Posted by Lori Hanson on July 21, 2019
My cousin Susan Gervasi, my dad’s (Howard’s) niece told me this story recently and I asked her if I could share it to this page. She said Howard’s mother used to call him “Junie” and when Susan was a little girl she had never heard her nana call Uncle Howard anything other than that. Her Uncle Howard and Aunt Jackie had always been known as, Junie and Jackie. It wasn’t until later on that someone told her that he was Howard Jr. and that’s why his nickname was “Junie.” She always thought it was so cute that they were, “J and J.” And she thought they were always a wonderful example of what a wonderful marriage was supposed to be.
Posted by Lori Hanson on July 21, 2019
This story came up in my Facebook memories this morning from four years ago (2015) Dad told it when we all were up at Melinda’s house for a 4th of July cookout in 2015.
One time the band was playing at a nursing home and an old man asked if they took requests and they liked to do that if they could, so he asked for some Frank Sinatra song. They didn't have the music to it but they thought they could do it so they fudged around a bit and found a key/range that was comfotable for him to sing in and they started playing. My dad said the little guy belted that song to the rooftop. He knew every word and every note. He knocked their socks off.
Posted by April McArthur on May 6, 2019
Awesome web tribute!! Mr. Kimball is very proud of the life he created and the family that he left behind. Rest in peace!!!
Posted by Claire Ellis on May 5, 2019
So sorry to hear this sad news! Your father will be missed. We had so much fun with your mother and father when they played music in NH. We had wonderful times which I will never forget!
May your father rest in peace! I cannot picture your mother without your father! They were a pair, always together! Prayers for your father and especially for your mother! Jackie, thinking of you and your children! Claire and Mick XXX ❤️
Posted by Donna Dean on May 4, 2019
Nice song, Howie and Jackie. Love the Cushman motorscooter. Dan had one of those too, a one seater.
We'll miss you Howie. Lots of years at Rice Creek.
Posted by Melinda Kimball on May 3, 2019
Howard L. Kimball, Jr.
“Howie”
July 17, 1932 – April 29, 2019
RIVERVIEW, FL – Howard L. Kimball, Jr. passed away peacefully after a period of failing health. Son of Howard L. Kimball, Sr. and Elizabeth J. (Langley) Kimball, Howie grew up in Danville, NH and graduated from Sanborn Seminary in Kingston, NH then met and married Jacquelyn (Moulton) of Fremont, NH. The couple bought their first home in Newton, NH in 1957 and began raising their family there while he attended night classes at Northeastern University in Lowell, MA., where he earned his degree as an electrical engineer. He was employed at Western Electric in North Andover, MA for 33 years. After residing in Newton for 25 years, he moved to Hampton Beach, NH and lived there for 21 years while he and his wife also owned and maintained several rental properties. In 2003 Howard and his wife sold their properties and began traveling extensively around the country by RV for 6 mos. out of the year. They met many people and saw every state in the country, including Alaska and Hawaii. They spent their winters in Riverview, Florida and eventually they sold their RV and bought a home in Riverview and spent their summers in Derry, NH. In 2016 they made the permanent move to Riverview.
Throughout his life Howard was well known for his musical endeavors. He played trumpet, flugel horn, and guitar and was also a wonderful singer. He was a member of many bands including Al Yelle’s Orchestra, The Red Beans and Rice Dixieland Band, Valley Guitar Club, Significant Others Dixieland Band and The Kitchen Band, The Rice Creek Rhythmaires, (which he led) to name a few, and played in local community bands both in New Hampshire and in Florida. He and his wife Jackie often sang together and made many recordings.
In his younger years Howard was an avid runner and participated in many road races. Later in life he maintained his fitness by walking and lived an overall healthy lifestyle. He loved animals, lived life to the fullest and could always make anyone laugh with his sharp wit.
He leaves behind his beloved “sweetie” Jackie (of nearly 62 years), a son Spencer Kimball and his wife Pam of Newton, NH, a daughter, Loralyn and her husband Douglas Hanson, of Sandown, NH and a daughter Melinda and her partner Lisa Kolosey of Winthrop, ME. He also leaves one sister Sally McCarthy and her long-time companion Hans Asang, of East Hampstead, NH, six grandchildren, two step-grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and five step-great-grandchildren, two nieces, a great niece and several cousins and other relatives by marriage, who thought the world of him. He is predeceased by two brothers, Albert and Alfred Kimball.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Mrs Stanley on October 14, 2020
Such sad news to hear about your Dad Lori. One of my first memories of your father was way back in the early 1970's after my family had recently moved to NH from CT. My mother got into a really bad car accident and a few days later there was a knock on our door and there stood your father with a casserole in his hand. His caring contribution to our time of trauma. It was one of the earliest acts of kindness I remember as a young girl. it was a very kind gesture of your father and really says it all about the person that he was ... very kind and humble with a great sense of humor. I know you all have great memories of your life with him and that hopefully will bring you much peace as you navigate your way forward in life without him. Sending lots of love your way Lori and my condolences to your family .
Posted by Lori Hanson on July 21, 2019
My cousin Susan Gervasi, my dad’s (Howard’s) niece told me this story recently and I asked her if I could share it to this page. She said Howard’s mother used to call him “Junie” and when Susan was a little girl she had never heard her nana call Uncle Howard anything other than that. Her Uncle Howard and Aunt Jackie had always been known as, Junie and Jackie. It wasn’t until later on that someone told her that he was Howard Jr. and that’s why his nickname was “Junie.” She always thought it was so cute that they were, “J and J.” And she thought they were always a wonderful example of what a wonderful marriage was supposed to be.
Posted by Lori Hanson on July 21, 2019
This story came up in my Facebook memories this morning from four years ago (2015) Dad told it when we all were up at Melinda’s house for a 4th of July cookout in 2015.
One time the band was playing at a nursing home and an old man asked if they took requests and they liked to do that if they could, so he asked for some Frank Sinatra song. They didn't have the music to it but they thought they could do it so they fudged around a bit and found a key/range that was comfotable for him to sing in and they started playing. My dad said the little guy belted that song to the rooftop. He knew every word and every note. He knocked their socks off.
Recent stories

So Much for a "Paying Gig."

Shared by Melinda Kimball on July 4, 2019

As everyone knows, my father played in many bands over the years. The bands did, usually, get paid for the gigs but they certainly weren't getting rich. And some gigs they played for free. I remember one particular gig he went to was quite a distance away and was only going to pay $50.00. He was the one who owned the sound system so he had to pack (squish) that huge thing with the ginormous speakers into his little vehicle and schlep it to the venue. Well, he loaded up and headed out and was running a bit behind so he was driving faster than he should have. He made it about half way there (to his $50.00 gig) got stopped for speeding, and got slapped with a $100.00 speeding ticket. When he got home he said, "Well, so much for a paying gig." Thank God he had a great sense of humor. 

Big Foot

Shared by Melinda Kimball on July 4, 2019

This memory popped into my head the other day....When we were kids we always had so much fun in the snow...It seemed like every winter we got a ton of snow. We made snow forts, snowmen, and I once made a snow horse. Anyway, one time after a snowstorm we went out to play in the backyard (because that's what kids did in those days.) When we got out there we saw HUGE human-like footprints in the snow at least 20 inches long, I'd say. We were all amazed and so excited thinking that bigfoot had walked through our backyard. When we went inside all yammering at once to tell our parents, our father had a big grin on his face. He, proceeded to show us the giant wooden feet cut outs he had made. I still don't know how he made them look so convincing without his own footprints showing up as well!

 

Belt it out, Buddy!

Shared by Lori Hanson on July 4, 2019

This came up in my Facebook memories this morning so I decided to post it on here. It’s a story dad told back at a family cookout at Melinda’s house On 5th of July back in 2015. 

One time the band was playing at a nursing home an old man asked if they took requests and they liked to do that if they could so he asked for some Frank Sinatra song. They didn't have the music to it but they thought they could do it so they fudged around a bit and found a key/range that was comfotable for him to sing in and they started playing. My dad said the little guy belted that song to the rooftop. He knew every word and every note. He knocked their socks off.