ForeverMissed
Anyone and everyone who met Hugh was won over by his kindness, gentleness, and how he listened to you with the sweetest smile.
The third of 4 children, and the only son of Daniel and Ruth Taylor (nee Walker), Hugh was born in Chendu, China where his father, a United Church minister, was serving as a missionary. This was a favorite story of Hugh’s, used many a time as an icebreaker. Due to his father’s poor health the family returned to Ontario in 1931 with baby Hugh travelling most of the long journey in a padded fruit box. The death of his father from pneumonia in 1935 was a terrible blow for his mother, left to raise four young children in the Great Depression.

Hugh grew up near High Park in Toronto and attended University of Toronto Schools. Summers were spent on his Aunt Margaret’s farm near Wiarton, an exciting experience for a city kid. His admiration of farmers, and physical work in general, was earned during these summers and he always regretted missing the harvest each fall. At school, although not particularly academic by nature, he became an outstanding athlete participating in floor hockey, gymnastics and wrestling. After graduation, Hugh spent 3 years in Fort William (now Thunder Bay) with the intention of becoming a public-school teacher, but ultimately decided it wasn’t his calling and returned to Toronto to study bookkeeping at Ryerson.

On a summer day in 1960, on his way from work, he noticed a young lady with bandaged leg and crutches waiting at a bus stop. He stopped to offer her a ride and met the love of his life. Karin, born in Austria, was visiting her older sister in Toronto intending to carry on to the warmer climate of Hawaii. She never made it. So, began 60 years of love and adventure.

Married in August of 1961, they quit their jobs and spent a 5-month honeymoon camping through France, Italy and finally Austria where Hugh met his in-laws for the first time. Upon their return to Canada, with very little money in their pockets, they had the good fortune to join the fledgling Alpine Ski Club of Collingwood, Ontario. Taking deep breaths and rubbing their few nickels together they bought a lot and started to build a small ski chalet. Hugh dove into this endeavour with gusto having spent many a weekend in his teenage years visiting and helping his sister and brother-in-law at their Lake Simcoe retreat. Surpassed only by his love for Karin and later his children, building “The Cottage” was Hugh’s passion and gift to our family. Working largely alone and by-guess-and by-golly, it was his pride and joy and both fitting and a blessing that it was there that he spent his last days.

The camaraderie and friendships made at Alpine were deep and lasted a lifetime. Hugh, with Karin beside him, thrived. Young, deeply in love, building both a first home in the city and the cottage in Collingwood, all that were needed were kids! So, in short order Stephen was born in 1964, followed 19 months later by Lisa. 
The years flew by. The kids grew strong and healthy. The ritual of driving up country every Friday night, skiing, socializing and always building and “puttering” until Sunday evening was repeated for decades. A few homes were bought and sold in Toronto. An addition (or two) were added to the little chalet at Alpine. And driven by Karin’s itch the family traveled almost yearly, often to sunshine destinations. The Caribbean, Austria (to visit Omi and Opa), Florida, Costa Rica and for the last 20 years, winters in Cuba. One legendary Christmas trip was to Innsbruck, lugging 29 separate pieces of luggage so the family could ski the Tyrolean Alps. The 3-day stopover in London only added to the challenge! On another occasion,

an original, full-sized windsurfer was flown to Barbados. By nature, but also perhaps necessity, he became a master packer. Once, Karin decided that a huge, antique wooden floor lamp (with matching shade) needed to be brought home from Innsbruck. Somehow, Hugh managed to get it on board … as carry-on!

In middle age, Hugh developed an interest in yachting and ultimately, he and Karin enjoyed many yearly flotilla holidays, sailing the British Virgin Islands, Greece, Croatia and Turkey. Although he took some sailing courses early on, Hugh’s grasp of the finer points of sailing a 35 ft yacht relied mostly on intuition, a few unplanned gybes and a good stiff drink each night once safely anchored. One of his favourite stories was when the flotilla’s lead boat hosted a roast on the last evening of one memorably windy trip and Hugh and Karin’s prize was an inflated set of rubber wash gloves, because it always looked like they could use an “extra set of hands”.

Hugh lived a full and fortunate life. Despite suffering profound hearing loss since childhood, he enjoyed meeting people whenever and wherever he went. Always courteous and unshakingly genuine, Hugh approached everyone with open mind and heart and together with Karin reveled in friendships far and wide. Many an evening at the cottage or elsewhere ended with friends gathered around the piano for a sing-along where “Hugh’s medley” was a crowd pleaser, delivered with gusto and only slightly out of tune. 
His athleticism and physical fitness were immense and carried him well into old age. Fueled by his legendary appetite (as a young man he was known to his niece and nephew as “Uncle Garbage Guts” for his ability to eat enormous meals) he routinely put in a full days physical work around the cottage well into his 80s. This level of fitness served him well. At the age of 86, after losing a leg above the knee due to an aneurysm, and against all odds, he learned to walk with a prosthetic and was able to travel two more winters to Cuba, as well as spend the last 4 summers at the cottage (which as a neighbour recently observed, required one to have the agility of a mountain goat).

Hugh Taylor was as honest, honourable and decent a man as one could hope to meet and know. In our family it was joked that he was “the last of the innocents”. We were blessed to have him as a husband and father and will forever hold him in our hearts.

Posted by Jim Cairns on October 14, 2020
The Cairns Family was deeply sadden upon learning of Hugh's passing. So many good times, so many happy memories we have shared together.
I met Hugh back in the mid 1970's and we hit it off immediately. We had so much in common, we were both in finance, had young families, and we shared similar backgrounds growing up, each of us spending summers on a farm. We both liked investing, do it yourself construction projects, hockey and best of all was our shared love of old time country music.
Hugh was a mentor to me and we talked about many projects. Our conversations were always interesting and we never ran out of things to discuss. His guidance and advice always so welcomed. Hugh helped me with an innovative design for the plumbing at our cottage which 30 years later is still leading edge. Another time Hugh helped me set up a One Write Accounting format for a summer church in Muskoka, no computer involved! He stayed with me until I got it right. I will always remember how generous he was with his time.
We both loved to ski and sail. Hugh and Karen introduced our family to windsurfing and fun weekends enjoyed at Alpine.
I think of Hugh often and really miss my dear friend. Hugh was simply a wonderful person and I will always be grateful for our friendship.
Our thoughts are with Karin and Lisa and Stephen and family during this very sad time.
Warmest Regards, Jim, Shirley and family
Posted by Zan Chandler on October 8, 2020
One of my earliest memories of Hugh is from when I was 16 or 17. It includes freezing temperatures, snow and a lot of falling down. As a new Canadian, only recently across the pond, I had never had the chance to learn how to ski. Hugh was not deterred by the challenge. I'm sure he had taught many beginners over the years. But perhaps none as old as me. I battled the freezing temperatures, the ice and my fear of falling. Hugh's patience and compassion must have worked because eventually I was skiing. Not gracefully or quickly but I was doing it. I can't remember how many lessons Hugh gave me. I'm sure it was more than one. But I will always remember how he was responsible for introducing me to a sport I grew to love, even if I never ever mastered it. Many years later, on a sunny day in the Snowy Mountains of Australia (atop of Mt. Kosciuszko to be exact), I remember thanking him for his generosity as I experienced my best and favourite ski day. The sky was brilliant blue, the air was warm, the snow was sparking and the run was long (as only a mountain can provide). Oh, the freedom!
It makes me wonder, for how many other kids did Hugh open up another world? I'm sure that number is significant. Thank you, Hugh.
Posted by Sarah Bunnett-Gibson on October 7, 2020
Well? Kindness and Fun seems to be my impressions when I think of Hugh !
I first met Karin and Hugh on a sunny hot beach in Cuba , many years ago.  And we always had so much fun . Hugh had a great broad smile , twinkling eyes and true spirit of fun !
 He choose beautiful extravert Karin as his life long wife!
As the great husband , that Hugh was ; he would sit back, watch and enjoy whatever " monkey buisness , " Karin would get into !
Nope! Not Hugh 's thing to get up on a Cuban resort stage, but he cleary enjoyed the fun and antics of watching his charming wife Karin do something wild or silly on the stage of the nighty resort show . I soon discovered that watching Hugh's face react. While Karin was up there, was a very entertaining show , all in itself!
  Donations, gifts for the Cubans.
Dear Hugh brought from Canada so much stuff ! Their suitcases always were  Heavy and Full ! Hugh patiently carried them every Cuban trip , so graciously. Yet again , another Trip . Hugh put 'stuff ' on and off planes, buses , vans , for these trips . Donations that would be given away in the hotel countryside of Cuba. Karin would give away so many things; clothing or runningshoes to the in need , extremly grateful Cubans . All was mde possible by the quiet caring
of Hugh 's kindness .
And lastly. How many awkward , heavy bicyles did kind Hugh; take apart, bundle up and put on those Cuban plane trips ? Was it 12 or even 15 ? 
Totally ' a big pain in the _----' ! [ an Unpleasent job. ]
Given away in Cuban as such important gifts! What a big loving heart !
REST In PEACE  dear HUGH
Posted by Linda Sutherland on October 6, 2020
My memories of my Uncle Hugh as a child, he would give me piggyback rides up and down the laneways at the cottage on Lake Simcoe. He seemed so strong and always had a big smile. As an adult I remember Hugh as a kind loving uncle, always interested in how and what we were doing in our lives. He was the best Uncle to myself snd brother Ken.
Posted by Bryan Evans on October 1, 2020
These life passage events are never easy. I have known Hugh for only 6 or so years. Not a lifetime ! As Steven has written he was incredibly decent. That was obvious to me at our first encounter and everyone thereafter. I always looked forward to a get together. We can’t do that anymore but there are lots memories. Love you Hugh!

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Jim Cairns on October 14, 2020
The Cairns Family was deeply sadden upon learning of Hugh's passing. So many good times, so many happy memories we have shared together.
I met Hugh back in the mid 1970's and we hit it off immediately. We had so much in common, we were both in finance, had young families, and we shared similar backgrounds growing up, each of us spending summers on a farm. We both liked investing, do it yourself construction projects, hockey and best of all was our shared love of old time country music.
Hugh was a mentor to me and we talked about many projects. Our conversations were always interesting and we never ran out of things to discuss. His guidance and advice always so welcomed. Hugh helped me with an innovative design for the plumbing at our cottage which 30 years later is still leading edge. Another time Hugh helped me set up a One Write Accounting format for a summer church in Muskoka, no computer involved! He stayed with me until I got it right. I will always remember how generous he was with his time.
We both loved to ski and sail. Hugh and Karen introduced our family to windsurfing and fun weekends enjoyed at Alpine.
I think of Hugh often and really miss my dear friend. Hugh was simply a wonderful person and I will always be grateful for our friendship.
Our thoughts are with Karin and Lisa and Stephen and family during this very sad time.
Warmest Regards, Jim, Shirley and family
Posted by Zan Chandler on October 8, 2020
One of my earliest memories of Hugh is from when I was 16 or 17. It includes freezing temperatures, snow and a lot of falling down. As a new Canadian, only recently across the pond, I had never had the chance to learn how to ski. Hugh was not deterred by the challenge. I'm sure he had taught many beginners over the years. But perhaps none as old as me. I battled the freezing temperatures, the ice and my fear of falling. Hugh's patience and compassion must have worked because eventually I was skiing. Not gracefully or quickly but I was doing it. I can't remember how many lessons Hugh gave me. I'm sure it was more than one. But I will always remember how he was responsible for introducing me to a sport I grew to love, even if I never ever mastered it. Many years later, on a sunny day in the Snowy Mountains of Australia (atop of Mt. Kosciuszko to be exact), I remember thanking him for his generosity as I experienced my best and favourite ski day. The sky was brilliant blue, the air was warm, the snow was sparking and the run was long (as only a mountain can provide). Oh, the freedom!
It makes me wonder, for how many other kids did Hugh open up another world? I'm sure that number is significant. Thank you, Hugh.
Posted by Sarah Bunnett-Gibson on October 7, 2020
Well? Kindness and Fun seems to be my impressions when I think of Hugh !
I first met Karin and Hugh on a sunny hot beach in Cuba , many years ago.  And we always had so much fun . Hugh had a great broad smile , twinkling eyes and true spirit of fun !
 He choose beautiful extravert Karin as his life long wife!
As the great husband , that Hugh was ; he would sit back, watch and enjoy whatever " monkey buisness , " Karin would get into !
Nope! Not Hugh 's thing to get up on a Cuban resort stage, but he cleary enjoyed the fun and antics of watching his charming wife Karin do something wild or silly on the stage of the nighty resort show . I soon discovered that watching Hugh's face react. While Karin was up there, was a very entertaining show , all in itself!
  Donations, gifts for the Cubans.
Dear Hugh brought from Canada so much stuff ! Their suitcases always were  Heavy and Full ! Hugh patiently carried them every Cuban trip , so graciously. Yet again , another Trip . Hugh put 'stuff ' on and off planes, buses , vans , for these trips . Donations that would be given away in the hotel countryside of Cuba. Karin would give away so many things; clothing or runningshoes to the in need , extremly grateful Cubans . All was mde possible by the quiet caring
of Hugh 's kindness .
And lastly. How many awkward , heavy bicyles did kind Hugh; take apart, bundle up and put on those Cuban plane trips ? Was it 12 or even 15 ? 
Totally ' a big pain in the _----' ! [ an Unpleasent job. ]
Given away in Cuban as such important gifts! What a big loving heart !
REST In PEACE  dear HUGH
his Life

A life of love (written by Stephen)

Anyone and everyone who met Hugh was won over by his kindness, gentleness, and how he listened to you with the sweetest smile.
The third of 4 children, and the only son of Daniel and Ruth Taylor (nee Walker), Hugh was born in Chendu, China where his father, a United Church minister, was serving as a missionary. This was a favorite story of Hugh’s, used many a time as an icebreaker. Due to his father’s poor health the family returned to Ontario in 1931 with baby Hugh travelling most of the long journey in a padded fruit box. The death of his father from pneumonia in 1935 was a terrible blow for his mother, left to raise four young children in the Great Depression. 

Hugh grew up near High Park in Toronto and attended University of Toronto Schools. Summers were spent on his Aunt Margaret’s farm near Wiarton, an exciting experience for a city kid. His admiration of farmers, and physical work in general, was earned during these summers and he always regretted missing the harvest each fall. At school, although not particularly academic by nature, he became an outstanding athlete participating in floor hockey, gymnastics and wrestling. After graduation, Hugh spent 3 years in Fort William (now Thunder Bay) with the intention of becoming a public-school teacher, but ultimately decided it wasn’t his calling and returned to Toronto to study bookkeeping at Ryerson. 

On a summer day in 1960, on his way from work, he noticed a young lady with bandaged leg and crutches waiting at a bus stop. He stopped to offer her a ride and met the love of his life. Karin, born in Austria, was visiting her older sister in Toronto intending to carry on to the warmer climate of Hawaii. She never made it. So, began 60 years of love and adventure. 

Married in August of 1961, they quit their jobs and spent a 5-month honeymoon camping through France, Italy and finally Austria where Hugh met his in-laws for the first time. Upon their return to Canada, with very little money in their pockets, they had the good fortune to join the fledgling Alpine Ski Club of Collingwood, Ontario. Taking deep breaths and rubbing their few nickels together they bought a lot and started to build a small ski chalet. Hugh dove into this endeavour with gusto having spent many a weekend in his teenage years visiting and helping his sister and brother-in-law at their Lake Simcoe retreat. Surpassed only by his love for Karin and later his children, building “The Cottage” was Hugh’s passion and gift to our family. Working largely alone and by-guess-and by-golly, it was his pride and joy and both fitting and a blessing that it was there that he spent his last days. 

The camaraderie and friendships made at Alpine were deep and lasted a lifetime. Hugh, with Karin beside him, thrived. Young, deeply in love, building both a first home in the city and the cottage in Collingwood, all that were needed were kids! So, in short order Stephen was born in 1964, followed 19 months later by Lisa. 
The years flew by. The kids grew strong and healthy. The ritual of driving up country every Friday night, skiing, socializing and always building and “puttering” until Sunday evening was repeated for decades. A few homes were bought and sold in Toronto. An addition (or two) were added to the little chalet at Alpine. And driven by Karin’s itch the family traveled almost yearly, often to sunshine destinations. The Caribbean, Austria (to visit Omi and Opa), Florida, Costa Rica and for the last 20 years, winters in Cuba. One legendary Christmas trip was to Innsbruck, lugging 29 separate pieces of luggage so the family could ski the Tyrolean Alps. The 3-day stopover in London only added to the challenge! On another occasion, 

an original, full-sized windsurfer was flown to Barbados. By nature, but also perhaps necessity, he became a master packer. Once, Karin decided that a huge, antique wooden floor lamp (with matching shade) needed to be brought home from Innsbruck. Somehow, Hugh managed to get it on board … as carry-on! 

In middle age, Hugh developed an interest in yachting and ultimately, he and Karin enjoyed many yearly flotilla holidays, sailing the British Virgin Islands, Greece, Croatia and Turkey. Although he took some sailing courses early on, Hugh’s grasp of the finer points of sailing a 35 ft yacht relied mostly on intuition, a few unplanned gybes and a good stiff drink each night once safely anchored. One of his favourite stories was when the flotilla’s lead boat hosted a roast on the last evening of one memorably windy trip and Hugh and Karin’s prize was an inflated set of rubber wash gloves, because it always looked like they could use an “extra set of hands”. 

Hugh lived a full and fortunate life. Despite suffering profound hearing loss since childhood, he enjoyed meeting people whenever and wherever he went. Always courteous and unshakingly genuine, Hugh approached everyone with open mind and heart and together with Karin reveled in friendships far and wide. Many an evening at the cottage or elsewhere ended with friends gathered around the piano for a sing-along where “Hugh’s medley” was a crowd pleaser, delivered with gusto and only slightly out of tune. 
His athleticism and physical fitness were immense and carried him well into old age. Fueled by his legendary appetite (as a young man he was known to his niece and nephew as “Uncle Garbage Guts” for his ability to eat enormous meals) he routinely put in a full days physical work around the cottage well into his 80s. This level of fitness served him well. At the age of 86, after losing a leg above the knee due to an aneurysm, and against all odds, he learned to walk with a prosthetic and was able to travel two more winters to Cuba, as well as spend the last 4 summers at the cottage (which as a neighbour recently observed, required one to have the agility of a mountain goat). 

Hugh Taylor was as honest, honourable and decent a man as one could hope to meet and know. In our family it was joked that he was “the last of the innocents”. We were blessed to have him as a husband and father and will forever hold him in our hearts. 
Recent stories

Missing Hugh...

Shared by Ibia Perez Bell on October 8, 2020
Hugh was a suchkind, good natured man, and it was a privilege to know him, he will be very much missed by all of his Cuban friends. Rest In Peace, dear Hugh.

Thank you Hugh

Shared by Lisa Taylor on September 30, 2020
Hugh ist und war einer dieser Menschen, die durch ihre Menschenliebe, Wärme, Herzlichkeit, Verlässlichkeit und Handschlagskraft bleibend wirken. Solche Menschen brauchen keinen Ruhm, sie wirken immer durch sich selbst.
Hugh hat mit Karin unseren Kindern und auch uns Herberge in weiter Ferne gegeben und geschenkt. Er hat unseren Kindern  den Start und den  Aufenthalt in einem canadischen Sommercamp  ermöglicht und nach wunderschönen Campwochen alle wieder in seine und Eure Herberge aufgenommen und sicher nach Hause geschickt und begleitet. Bleibende Werte wurden unseren Kindern dadurch gegeben.
Menschenliebe, Gastfreundschaft,  Verständnis  und Wunsch, jungen Menschen Prägungen für ihre Leben dauerhaft mitzugeben  zeichnen Hugh ganz besonders aus. Hughs innere Werte wurden und werden so in die Welt hinausgetragen und wirken weiter.
Wir haben länger als sonst gebraucht, Euch unser Beileid für das Ableben von Hugh zu senden und Euch zu danken, dass Ihr Hugh in eine andere Welt hinüberbegleitet habt. 
Wir brauchten mehr Zeit für diese Zeilen, da uns die Nachricht vom Ableben Hughs tief getroffen hat. Wir wollten einen Ort finden, wo wir in Ruhe und Stille für Hugh Kerzen anzünden  konnten, um ihm eine Nachricht zu senden, dass wir ihn nie vergessen werden. Diesen Ort fanden wir im hinteren Schmirntal, einem stillen Tal unter den Tuxer Bergen. Dort steht im Wald unter hohen Bergen eine kleine Kapelle, die den schönen Namen "Kapelle der Herberge" trägt. In der Kirche zündeten wir Kerzen für Hugh und für Euch an und stellten diese leuchteten Kerzen in diese kleine Kirche. Diese Kirche wurde vor langer Zeit errichtet, und zwar in Erinnerung an eine junge Frau mit ihrem Kind, die bei Sturm und Kälte einen Ort der Bleibe suchte und von einem Mann gefunden wurden. Zur Ehre der Herberge und zur Erinnerung der Bedeutung von Herberge und Schutz wurde die Kirche errichtet. Hugh war ein Sinnbild für Herberge, Schutz und Sicherheit und Wärme.
Verzagt nicht über das Fortgehen von Hugh. er verließ nur das Zimmer und ging in einen anderen Raum, den wir alle einmal betreten müssen und wo Raum, Zeit  und Entfaltung für unsere Seelen vorhanden ist. 
Unsere Liebe begleitet Hugh immer.
Seid umarmt 
Armin, Birgt, Elvira, Sigrid, Barbara und Herwig