ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, James Truscott, 64 years old, born on May 26, 1956, and passed away on April 28, 2021. We will remember him forever.

Please contribute to this memorial with memories and moments of Jim's life stories. 

Jim Truscott OAM passed away suddenly on the 28th April 2021.  At the time of his death Jim was on an unsupported push bike tour of the Mungo Loop with two close friends.  They were following the footsteps of the Burke and Wills expedition and were approximately 80km north of Balranald nearing the end of their first day’s ride when Jim collapsed.  They’d had a great day, perfect autumn conditions, much friendly banter, enjoying life to the full far from the madding crowd.  Jim passed as he lived – with his boots on, riding into the setting sun, on an adventure.
Funeral details to follow.
 The family have also requested that in lieu of flowers you make a donation to The Australian Himalayan Foundation https://www.australianhimalayanfoundation.org.au in Jim’s name.  





Posted by Tony Webster-Smith on May 7, 2021
Well mate I guess dinner at my place is off but we'll catch up again. I'll miss the cups of tea, sharing the wins and losses. Always genuine and with good intent you always challenged. You proudly wore the leather out of the shoes, frenetically communicated and humorously remonstrated. I learnt to appreciate that no is a starting position and I always felt sorry for the person saying no.  I will miss your energy, enthusiasm, laughs and the bottles of red and the relaxed conversations with you and Collette on latest exploits and planned adventures. Being very Jim, you departed on adventure.
Posted by Martin Dransfield on May 7, 2021
I had the great privilege to meet Jim in Timor-Leste in 2019 and we exchanged a number of emails resulting from our shared love of Timor-Leste and its people. Moreover, he was intent on telling the story of 2/2nd Commando Squadron and ensuring that the Falantil story was captured before the veterans passed on. He also wanted to capture the Australian and New Zealand story from 1999.

His energy and passion for Timor-Leste and life was boundless. He was trusted by the Timorese and his vision was to produce a battlefield tour guide for veterans and their families to return to Timor-Leste.

It was an honour to have spent time with you Jim. Rest In Peace.

Posted by Guy Duczynski on May 7, 2021
A sad and much too early end to an amazing life of achievements in military, business and adventure. 
Rock climbing with Jim was always an exciting experience; you just never knew how the day would play out. On a visit to a mountain warfare course in the early 90's he was the first with his skis on, the first to knock up a hot brew, the first to get his tent up at the end of a long day and the first into his sleeping bag.
As a military thinker and challenger of the status quo he was unequalled.
RIP Jim
 
Posted by Marc Preston on May 6, 2021
I had the privilege of serving as one of your young Officers at 2 Coy and can say without equivocation you were one of the best OCs we had who was always focused on the mission, men and Unit capability - sometimes to the detriment of your career. I was also fortunate to have kept in touch with you since the 90's and being dragged in your wake with Crisis Leaders, reviewing you prodigious articles and books and of course the epic motorbike adventure through Timor Leste. You were a big influence on my life and career and will certainly be missed mate. RIP Jim
Posted by Jim Wallace on May 6, 2021
Jim was indeed a unique individual. 
His passion for unconventional warfare and combination of courage, intelligence and vision would have seen him standout and widely written about in conflicts at any other point of history. Truly remarkable person and missed. 
Colette, you and the family can be very proud of him.
Posted by christine helliwell on May 6, 2021
A great friend and tireless ferreter-out of the truth. Without his generosity my forthcoming book on Operation Semut would have been considerably poorer. So sorry that I now won't get the change to argue with him about it. Deepest sympathies to Colette and family.
Posted by Truck Sams on May 6, 2021
I first met Jim at the Army Parachute School where my first impressions of him were correct. He was indeed a true officer and a gentleman amongst his peers and always respected his fellow soldiers. I would have gladly served under him during peace time and operations. Rest In Peace my friend 

Truck Sams and The Long Ride Home Team
Posted by John Trevivian on May 6, 2021
Jim used to joke to me when we he was in his early 20's that it would be a miracle if he survived beyond 30 years of age. This indicated the drive he had to live life to the full, take (calculated) risks and enjoy what he wanted to do. He survived the 30 years milestone and Jim went on to cram as much as he could into life. I was always interested to find out what he was doing and he kept in periodic contact. I was very sad to hear the news.
Posted by Margaret Lyons on May 5, 2021
I did not know army Jim but I do know my cousin Jim’s intense gaze had thawed out over time.
Jim was driven but comfortable in his civilian suit and tie. He loved a challenge and relished using his life skill, wit and the pen to take on the corporate world in crisis.
Jim greatly cherished his wife, children and grandchildren. He was somewhat amused by the width and diversity of the wider family across the country and our Irish roots. He was currently researching the family tree, many of us receiving text messages and requesting information just days before his passing.
Jim relished the challenges of looking into past history, following up links to our convict past and rattling the bones of buried secrets.
Jim's passing is a reminder to all of us to make every moment count.
Margaret Lyons ( Unternaehrer) [First cousin of Jim on his maternal side]
Posted by Shane Cornell on May 5, 2021
Goodbye Sir, but never forgotten. Inspirational and challenging, you taught many the art of dancing with the tiger.


Posted by Mark Smethurst on May 5, 2021
“If happiness is the goal – and it should be, then adventures should be top priority.” – Richard Branson
I first met Jim when he was the operations officers at SASR and I was OC 3 Sqn in 1996. I will never forget the legacy that Jim left on many, he was truely a Special Operator who challenged himself and those around him. He never lacked energy or an opinion and his counsel was something many sort over their lifetime. Jim has lived a remarkable life and will be greatly missed by us all. My thoughts are with Jim's family and many friends who will be much affected by his loss. Mark
Posted by Richard Pelling on May 5, 2021
Good morning

I was tasked by H.E. the Prime-Minister Timor Leste (Jose Maria Vasconcelos aka Taur Ruak) to convene the following message to you and to the Family:
"It is with great sorrow that we hear the shocking news of the tragic passing of hour “Comrade in arms” Jim Truscott.
Mr. Jim was a good Friend, a good Military, and a beloved person who gathered many good Friends in Timor-Leste.
We remember His happiness, His strong commitment, dedication and sacrifice spirit, towards Timor-Leste Peace and Development
It is a great lost for all of us and we would like to convene to Friends and Family, our deepest condolences, our good prayers and wishes to God Almighty to assist you all in these hard moments
May God Bless Mr. Jim Truscott soul with His kindness and receive His Spirit back to Light! "
We will keep Mr. Jim Truscott alive with our good memories and among our prayers!
Thank you again for your message

Warm regards

Jose Fernando Real
Secretariat of GPM Timor Leste
Posted by Mike Trafford on May 5, 2021
We were truly shocked to learn of Jim's death. So fit, strong, energetic and filled with purpose, he seemed the least likely. I first met Jim with a mutual cricketing friend in Year 12. I recall being struck by a blazing intensity and, in hindsight, I think that was his impatience to get the world by the throat and wring every last drop of achievement out of it. Two years later, Jim arrived at the Royal Military College. His room was on the ground floor of Cork Block in Long Tan Company. His audacity, in leapfrogging the trials of 4th Class directly into 3rd, exemplified his attitude that nothing he believed should be done was impossible. Decades later, I worked for Jim on several Crisis Leaders jobs. His legendary energy, drive, belief and intellect overwhelmed some, but everyone was enriched by association. Jim's passing will leave a huge space in the lives of his family, friends and colleagues, but in time his legacy will fill it. Vale Jim
Posted by Harri Keinonen on May 4, 2021
I am extremely saddened to learn of Jim’s passing.
I had the pleasure of briefly working for him on “special projects” during my posting to the regiment. I remember that I immediately took a liking to him for his intellect and energy. But especially for his unconventionality and odd-ball status within the unit. And that’s saying something in a unit full of exceptional individuals.

I first met Jim, I think, whilst I was a sergeant posted to the Defence Staff of the Australian Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. He was planning the OP RIMAO REVISITED kayaking expedition then.  I was tasked by the defence attaché to be the organizer and liaison on the Indonesian and Singapore and. I then met him and the rest of his team in the Riau archipelago in the middle of the night to ensure that cooperation between the Indonesian authorities and his team was working as planned.

I didn’t get to know him personally until I was posted to the regiment from Jakarta. From the reaction of some members after learning that I would be working for him on unspecified special projects, I learned quickly that Jim was a bit of a polarising figure. There was some eye rolling and head shaking from some. Amused tolerance from others. But overwhelmingly it was impressed upon me that this was a man of great intelligence, vision and courage. I could almost feel the air around him hum with his energy.

To me, and my all too brief association with him, Jim was the modern equivalent of such mid-20th century personages as Sir Hubert Wilkins, Sydney Cotton and Fitzroy Maclean. If Jim had been born in the 1920s, I’m sure that we would have been reading about his daring and unconventional exploits during WW2 in history books. He was intrepid, inventive and indefatigable.

I am grateful to have known him and to have worked with him. I join with his family, his mates and his colleagues in mourning his passing.

Vale Jim Truscott.

Harri Keinonen
Posted by Greg Pike on May 4, 2021
Jim Truscott was a member of a unique group of 152 Australians who served on Op DAMON in Southern Rhodesia in 1979/80. On behalf of this group, i send sincere condolences to Colette and family as you mourn his untimely passing. We salute you Jim! Your duty done.
Posted by Phil Davidson on May 4, 2021
We were shocked to hear of Jim's passing.
Jim was effervescent like a man in his 20's, always appearing to be in perpetual motion. It didn't matter if you sent him an E-mail at 1 am, from wherever he was you would likely get a response then or in a matter of hours afterwards (as long as he wasn't halfway up some mountain in a place you could hardly pronounce).
I had the privilege of getting to know Jim over the last 20 years or so & while the engagements of his time were generally short and sweet (quality, non-nonsense events), I did travel with him to Borneo and a number of remote places around Australia as the time and need arose. I have been lucky to have known Jim and again privileged to read quite a bit of his written work of story's that films could be made of.
It is a great loss and my sincere condolences to his family, his colleagues and friends as he will be sorely missed by us all.  Jim, you were an inspiration. Istirahatlah dengan tenang, pak Jim.
Posted by Peter Allen on May 4, 2021
Vale Major Jim Truscott, It was pleasure to serve with you at the 1st Field Squadron (1 FER).  You will be surely missed by all who knew and served with you in the Squadron and during your time of service in the ADF.  Rest in peace, Jim. 
Posted by Ian McPhedran on May 4, 2021
Without doubt one of the most intelligent and interesting men I have ever met. Jim was a truly original thinker and always up for a chat on any subject you could imagine. A wonderful soldier and successful businessman, he will be sorely missed. My deepest sympathy to Colette and family. Vale Jim.
Posted by Peter King on May 4, 2021
It was Boxing Day 1979. The Australian contingent of the Commonwealth cease-fire monitoring force (Rhodesia) had just landed and been briefed by Major Peter Cosgrove at the Rhodesian Light Infantry Barracks. I was teamed up with a young engineer Lt, Jim Truscott and we were immediately flown to the Chiota Tribal Trust Land near Marandellas in two British Army Gazelle helicopters. I shared a hootchie with him for the next three months attached to the Rhodesian Amy’s 1 Psychological Operations Unit. On one occasion we received a letter from a group of “freedom fighters” who wanted to surrender to us but thought the Rhodesian Army would kill them. Jim decided that he and I would go and talk them into surrendering peacefully. Along with a small contingent of Rhodesians we traveled to a Native Kraal and Jim announced he would walk in unarmed and talk. I waited and soon a company group of Rhodesians arrived and wanted to attack the Kraal. I managed to get them to give me 15 minutes and went looking for Jim. I found him in a hut with about 6 heavily armed “freedom fighters” (AK 47’s and RPG 2’s) and some villagers all drinking mealie maize beer (warm brown horrible stuff) and some were smoking Dacca (marijuana). By now Jim was their best friend and he had convinced them to come back to Marandellas as they were safe under his protection. He also convinced the Rhodesian company commander (who was also a big fan of Jim’s unorthodox methods) to safely escort us to the police HQ whilst we sat in the back of a truck singing chimeringa (freedom) songs with our new friends. Jim was an amazing character born a hundred years too late. He became a friend for life and I will miss his enthusiasm and intellect. My thoughts are with Collette, his family and friends.
Major Peter King (ret’d)
Posted by George Clegg on May 4, 2021
Tragic news. Jim was an excellent officer with a memorable steely determination. He had a mischievous side and it was a pleasure to serve with him and follow his remarkably successful career. George Clegg RMO, SASR 1980-84
Posted by Paul Fuller on May 4, 2021
Our lives crossed briefly many years ago. Condolences to your family and many friends. May you Rest In Peace.
Posted by Phil Goodear on May 4, 2021
I would like to pass on my sincere condolences to Jim's wife, Collette, his children and grandchildren, the wider family and the network of friends and colleagues of past and present. Like everyone, I was shocked to hear of Jim's passing.

Jim and I first met during our guerrilla warfare course in 1988 and we teamed up again in 1989 for Ex: Blue Flame...and what an enjoyable experience it was to be part of the GWTT Taipan with Jim as the leader. I liked and respected Jim and what he tried to do for himself and others...and that was to make you 'be better' than you are.

Jim was and will remain a remarkable individual who had an incredible sense of adventure, was personable, he had a positive impact on me and he always valued my contributions.

Rest in peace Jim (Taipan)

Respectfully,
Phil
Posted by Jeff Dvaie on May 4, 2021
One of those rare, extraordinary people who we occasionally have the privilege to know in life.
Live all you can, learn all you can, give all you can, to paraphrase a John Wesley quote.
What a life and inspiration to the rest of us mortals.
We shall remember him. Or perhaps Jim might have preferred it if we were to say... who could forget him?
Posted by Graham Brammer on May 4, 2021
Jim... The moment you were conceived they broke the mould. I don't recall ever working with you but I do recall a number of discussions we had about rock climbing, mountaineering and even tactics. Ah! Yes; and concepts. You were a skilful writer whose stories left a reader with thought provoking ideas. My favourites were the fireside chats with Genghis Khan around a camel dung fire. Farewell Warrior... Brother in Arms... Rest in Peace.
Prairie Dog
Posted by Ian Errington on May 4, 2021
I did not know Jim well, but had some dealings with his literary endeavours. I published everything he submitted to the Defence Force Journal and the readership was enriched by each and every piece. He certainly encouraged debate and left his critics looking dull in the wake of his thoughts. Thanks for your service and your ideas Jim.
Posted by David Birkett on May 3, 2021
I first met Jim in June 1982, in Darwin, N.T. and left an indelible impression in the recesses of my mind. I again met Jim in March 2002 in the Fleet Street Coffee lounge in Pulteney Street Adelaide with Bob Kilsby to form Truscott Crisis Leaders, which I was privileged and honoured to join this 'band of brothers' , or Jim's Guerrilla Group, as Jim advised that his unusual structure was based on that model. I salute Jim and am grateful for the extensive example and leadership, provided to us all in this unique group. RIP Jim my friend.
Posted by Russ Baker on May 4, 2021
From the first time I met you, cleaning your toenails with a fork at the dining table in the SASR Officers Mess in 1981, something just told me you were different.  This grew over the years during many climbing adventures to some pretty exposed parts of south-west Australia, and then over east when we were both in Sydney.  Then there was that bloody passage you had me read at your marriage to Collette !
A fearless speaker of the truth, even if it was unpleasant, every country needs a Jim Truscott (but maybe only one).  You have inspired those who will follow you, but it is hard to imagine anyone ever replacing Jim.
Have fun on your next great adventure.
Russ
Posted by Ian Young on May 3, 2021
So shocked and saddened at your sudden passing.
We are comforted by the fact you were on yet another adventure with brothers in arms.
You were, and always be a legend, especially of the unconventional.
We all stood in awe of your amazing energy!
You will never be forgotten.
RIP Taipan
Posted by Jason Gotch on May 3, 2021
I only had the pleasure of meeting Jim once and then a couple of phone calls, but what an impression he made and more than backed up the stories that I had heard. Like many I read and shared his Crisis Manual and referenced his name in corporate meetings as a recognised SME reference point. A life of such adventure and exhilaration seemingly lost in such a manner just seems a bit unfair. RIP, Jim.
Posted by John Blaxland on May 3, 2021
Jim was a legend I was privileged to know and work with. He was a source of inspiration. He left a deep impression wherever he went and with whoever he met. He was a true patriot and an honourable man. He will be missed. Vale, Jim
Posted by Vicki O'Haire on May 3, 2021
"All men dream ,but not equally. Those that dream in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was only vanity, but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they act out their dreams with open eyes to make it happen" T.E Lawrence , Jim was a Dangerous man".
Continue to push the bounds.
Rick O'Haire
Posted by Rick Simpson on May 3, 2021
Thanks for your contributions Jim, to life, to memories of 3 Squadron together, and to the Rendezvous. You will be sorely missed by all whose lives to which you added colour, excitement and provocation. May your next journey be as fulfilling and remarkable as the one you have left behind. Perjalanan yang bagus.
Posted by Martin Hamilton-Smith on May 3, 2021
Goodbye Jim. You always left us wondering if we could do more, strive harder and have a different look at the view to see if we had missed any thing. As CO of Commando's I would have been happy to drop you and 2CDO into Burma In1942; they would have followed you to a man and Orde Wingate would have welcomed you! I am glad to have put you together with Collette in the early days! Best thing ever. Thanks for your friendship and guidance.You were loved by many, you made a real mark and you will live on. Marty HS
Posted by john thurgar on May 3, 2021
May Jim's spirit be soaring with the eagles high over the Himal at the dawn of every new day. May his spirit, enthusiasm for life, endurance, sense of tradition and adventure remain among those of us who were privileged to know him till our own passing.
May the legacy he has left behind with his writings and photos inspire the next generation of Australians to achieve their life long ambitions as well. 
Posted by Rick Moor on May 3, 2021
Vale Jim, it was a great journey while it lasted. Many early starts, heavy packs, hard days and freezing nights, mixed in with a liberal dose of fear. But much laughter and mischief. In all great memories and great friendship. Bon voyage Min

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Tony Webster-Smith on May 7, 2021
Well mate I guess dinner at my place is off but we'll catch up again. I'll miss the cups of tea, sharing the wins and losses. Always genuine and with good intent you always challenged. You proudly wore the leather out of the shoes, frenetically communicated and humorously remonstrated. I learnt to appreciate that no is a starting position and I always felt sorry for the person saying no.  I will miss your energy, enthusiasm, laughs and the bottles of red and the relaxed conversations with you and Collette on latest exploits and planned adventures. Being very Jim, you departed on adventure.
Posted by Martin Dransfield on May 7, 2021
I had the great privilege to meet Jim in Timor-Leste in 2019 and we exchanged a number of emails resulting from our shared love of Timor-Leste and its people. Moreover, he was intent on telling the story of 2/2nd Commando Squadron and ensuring that the Falantil story was captured before the veterans passed on. He also wanted to capture the Australian and New Zealand story from 1999.

His energy and passion for Timor-Leste and life was boundless. He was trusted by the Timorese and his vision was to produce a battlefield tour guide for veterans and their families to return to Timor-Leste.

It was an honour to have spent time with you Jim. Rest In Peace.

Posted by Guy Duczynski on May 7, 2021
A sad and much too early end to an amazing life of achievements in military, business and adventure. 
Rock climbing with Jim was always an exciting experience; you just never knew how the day would play out. On a visit to a mountain warfare course in the early 90's he was the first with his skis on, the first to knock up a hot brew, the first to get his tent up at the end of a long day and the first into his sleeping bag.
As a military thinker and challenger of the status quo he was unequalled.
RIP Jim
 
his Life

Vale Jim Truscott OAM

Jim Truscott OAM passed away suddenly on the 28th April 2021.  At the time of his death Jim was on an unsupported push bike tour of the Mungo Loop with two close friends.  They were following the footsteps of the Burke and Wills expedition and were approximately 80km north of Balranald nearing the end of their first day’s ride when Jim collapsed.  They’d had a great day, perfect autumn conditions, much friendly banter, enjoying life to the full far from the madding crowd.  Jim passed as he lived – with his boots on, riding into the setting sun, on an adventure.
Jim was well known for his drive, enthusiasm and dogged determination.  He was in many ways a renaissance man – a very professional but unconventional soldier; intrepid and daring adventurer; somewhat reluctant engineer; amateur but respected historian and author; red wine connoisseur; highly successful businessman; and committed community member; but above all son, brother, husband, father, grandfather and friend.   
Jim first served in the Marist Brothers Ash Grove school cadet unit then the Queensland University Regiment before entering the Royal Military College (RMC) Duntroon as a third class cadet in 1975.  He graduated in 1977 and was awarded a BE (Hons) in 1978 (he later completed a BA out of interest).  Jim subsequently served as a Troop Commander in 1 Field Squadron of the 1st Field Engineer Regiment and as an observer with the Commonwealth Monitoring Force in Rhodesia attached to a mixed race field propaganda unit before completing selection and serving as the Operations Officer in 3 SAS Squadron. He along with his Officer Commanding will be long remembered for organising and overseeing “Exercise Biltong Watcher”, an epic in the Northern Territory that even included airstrikes by B52s operating from Guam.  Jim subsequently served as the Garrison Engineer in Newcastle and on the Operations Staff in Field Force Command, Army Headquarters and Headquarters Special Forces.  Following these postings he vowed to never again serve in the “Big Army” or as a “Staff Wally”.  He achieved legendary status as the Officer Commanding 2 Commando Company with his many innovative and realistic exercises often involving short notice call out.  He also served in the Pilbara Regiment as a Surveillance Squadron Commander then in the Northern Territory as a Civil Affairs Officer before returning to as the Operations Officer in SASR.  It is during this last posting that his ingenuity, knowledge and experience came to the fore as he led the regimental planning team for the deployment to the Middle East to enforce the no fly zone, the initial entry by the ADF into East Timor and the counter terrorist support to the 2000 Sydney Olympics.  But above all Jim’s core professional interest lay in Special Warfare.  Hestarred on the Special Warfare Course, taught himself jungle Bahasa Indonesia and studied in detail the activities of the Services Reconnaissance Department (SRD) during WW2.  He was a known “Friend of Z” and had befriended, supported and interviewed many of the original operatives.  He had also conducted a long distance sea kayak trip from Singapore through the Indonesian archipelago tracing the route of the escaping OP RIMAU party, spent two months walking through the jungles of Borneo retracing the steps of the OP SEMUT operatives and interviewing the few surviving guerrillas and their families and had recently travelled to East Timor to research a battle field guide covering the activities of the Independent Companies and SRD in WW2, TNI and Falantil during the Independence War and finally INTERFET and UNTAET post 1999.  As a Special Forces Officer, Jim was one of the few truly unconventional thinkers, and he pushed and prodded SASR and Commandos toward more advanced capabilities, often with complete disregard to his own career.  A subordinate at the time recounts that it was always a joy and terror to be a junior officer within his command or earshot.
Jim was also a passionate, committed and enthusiastic mountaineer, rock climber and Nordic skier.  As a cadet at Duntroon he was a founding member of the RMC Mountaineering Club, instrumental in the re-establishment of the Army Alpine Association (AAA) and the instigator of the famous RMC August Epic.  He was a fierce and dedicated climber and mountaineer his entire life. Anyone who knew Jim will have a favourite tale of his eccentricities, his at times manic drive and his fiery intellect, his endless energy, great projects and causes and his legendary wordsmithing. He was always driving hard, whether rustling up a team to tackle Carstenz’s Pyramid; signing off on C130 flights for Everest logistics or hitting up Big Ben Pies to sponsor an expedition to the remote volcano of the same name.  Jim’s list of achievements is lengthy. As a mountaineer and climber he first headed to the Southern Alps of New Zealand in December 1974.  He then spent many summers in the 70’s and early 80’s in the Southern Alps.  While recovering from a major injury incurred solo climbing near Majors Creek, Jim made an early ascent of Ball’s Pyramid, this in turn after a disastrous and near death experience attempting to sail to the remote sea stack.  In 1981 hesurvived an avalanche at Camp 2 on Ganesh IV (7102 m) in Nepal.  Tragically Dave Sloane was not so lucky and was swept to his death.  Jim was a member of the successful expedition to Broad Peak (8047 m) in Pakistan in 1986, at that stage only the second 8000 metre peak climbed by an Australian team. Jim was also a member of the successful 1988 Australian Bicentennial Everest Expedition, the second ascent of the mountain by an Australian team and the only ascent of the mountain accomplished without local high altitude porters. He was awarded an Order of Australia Medal and Chief of the Defence Force Commendation for his organising efforts and participation in this activity.  Subsequently, he climbed Aconcagua in Argentina (the highest mountain in the America’s) in 1990, Carstenz Pyramid in Irian Jaya (the highest mountain in South East Asia) in 1991 then Nanda Devi East on a multi-national expedition with the Indian Army in 1996.
He was also a voracious rock climber, putting up hundreds of new rock climbing routeswherever he was based from Kangaroo Point and Frog Buttress in south east Queensland, the Sydney Sea Cliffs and Blue Mountains in New South Wales, Arapiles and the Grampians in Victoria, the remote Western Australia northwest coast, to the Perth Hills and his beloved Southwest. Generations of future climbers will puzzle at his climb names and wonder at his route selection and bolting practices. Jim knew a quality route when he saw it, but didn’t mind putting up the odd scrappy climb – one climbing partner recalls getting told to bring a shovel when joining him on one of his Perth Hills new routing adventures.   Many a climbing partner will recall that it was always prudent to double check Jim’s belay stances and to be wary of his pick of climbs, as the call “your lead” would oft come at an inopportune moment.  They will also recall many a session in the Dugandan, Natimuk and Mt Vic pubs contemplating their failures, celebrating their successes and building Dutch courage for future ventures.  In the 70’s, 80’s and early 90’s Jim was also a committed and competitive Nordic skier.  He organised and competed in many Inter-Service events, representing Army on numerous occasions and finishing in the top 30 in NSW state championships several times in the 1980’s.  On one occasion he, along with a friend, skied from Kiandra to Mt Kosciusko in 18 hours.  In 1989 he also led a ski mountaineering trip to Mt Shasta in California.  Jim had in addition to tracing the route of the OP RIMAU operatives conducted several remote sea kayak trips including to the Monte Bello Islands and two attempts to cross the Torres Strait.  He also rafted the Franklin in Tasmania before it became popular.  
Immediately following the Sydney Olympics Jim left the Army and entered business as a crisis management consultant, first with a British multinational company, before setting up his own firm “Truscott Crisis Leaders”.  After a lean start Jim through sheer determination and exceptionally hard work established a very successful consultancy with a clientele that included many of the world’s leading multi-national companies.  His straight forward and sometimes abrupt style was not everyone’s cup of tea but his advice and training was highly valued by many mining and off shore oil and gas companies operating in the remote corners of the world.  Jim was known to cover 10 countries in 7 days, conduct day trips to Singapore and travel to Europe for one day jobs.   His ideas, advice, guidance and training significantly enhanced the emergency response capabilities and safety of many work places around the globe.   
Jim was a prolific writer.  A cursory inspection of professional journals and newsletters will feature Jim Truscott.  Jim’s thoughts on Special Operations published under his nom de guerre “Taipan” while his accounts of his personal adventures not only inspired many but were in the finest traditions of mountain writing.  He was also a prolific reviewer and authored several books including his autobiography “Snakes in the Jungle – Special Operations in War and Business”, an account of OP SEMUT titled “Voices from Borneo – The Japanese War” and a business sales guide titled “Who Dares Sell, Wins - Mastering True Sales in Management”.  At the time of his death he was finalising a detailed “Battlefield Guide of East Timor”.  His writing was always erudite, often lengthy and sometimes unprintable.   As you considered his ideas and read of his adventures, as you listened to his proposals and stories, you were sometimes stunned by his audacity but more often left enriched by his grasp of history, military capabilities, mountain geography and business practices, giddy in the wake of his often preposterous ideas and actions, and unsettled by how boring your own mind and life appeared next to his.
Following the recent sale of his business Jim qualified as a Surf Life Saver and served as a hose man in the Darlington Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade.  He was also actively working with the 2/2nd Commando Company Association in an attempt to have the unit awarded a Unit Citation for Gallantry for their actions as an Independent Company in Timor in 1942 and the HMAS Armidale Association on a project to locate the wreck.
Above all, Jim was a family man, devoted to his wife, children and grandchildren.  He was a man to follow and learn from, both in his words and deeds. You had to be quick to keep up and follow his thinking, but he suffered fools better than he made out, and we are all the better for his friendship and life.   His passing not only brings a great sadness to his family and close friends but leaves an enormous gap for many across military, veteran, business and adventure communities. Vale Jim Truscott, gone but not forgotten.
Recent stories

East Timor 99 Jim, TMR & Bruce P

Shared by BRUCE PARKER on May 6, 2021
East Timor 99
Shared by Jim Wallace on May 6, 2021
I first met Jim when I was the Adjutant at Duntroon and he a cadet. He marched into the office one day and said that the Supervising Officer for Cross Country Skiing had fallen ill and couldn’t take them up the snow that weekend - would I fill in.  I wasn’t a skier of any type, but he assured me there were some lessons before they planned a short ski trip.  Not wanting to see them have to miss the trip, I agreed.  We got there and I did the lessons and then went to the RV for the “short ski trip” to find myself at the start of the Australian Cross Country Skiing Championships - entered by Jim!

Tribute to Jim

Shared by BRUCE PARKER on May 6, 2021
Collette and Family,
Jim left us all the poorer for his passing one of the very best of the best.
I would have followed him any where. Unconventional soldier of the first order husband, father and a great mate. Rest in peace Jim you will live on indefinitely lest we forget.

Bruce commented "I took this photo of TMR and Jim in Ailieu which is about one hour south of Dili . It was where Falintil were in voluntary cantonment in 1999 . Jim presented this picture to TMR when we were hosted at his home for dinner on the bike ride we did in Timor Leste together with Jim, Dick Pelling, Mark Preston, Keith and Barry Hughes and myself . Collette was riding shotgun in the back up 4WD her nursing skills came in handy as all, with the exception of Marc and Barry, fell off . Bruce. P.