ForeverMissed
This memorial website honors the memory of Georgene Wilkins (Jeanie), 89. Please come together here and share your memories, stories, and photos of Jeanie.

Georgene was born on February 4, 1932 in Lewiston, ID to her parents, Lowell (Babe) Maynard and Grace Painter Maynard. She grew up in the Salmon River mountains and Clearwater Valley. After graduating from Kamiah High School, Georgene put herself through school to become a cosmetologist. She was married to Eugene Johnson from 1951 until his death in 1962. Georgene re-married to Glen Wilkins, and they started a family together in Kamiah before moving to Slate Creek in 1975. Georgene worked as a cosmetologist while raising her family and helping Glen design and build two log homes on their family property. Georgene’s famous sourdough pancakes brought joy to everyone seated at her table over the years, and those memories live on in the countless sourdough starters she shared with those she loved.

In her 70's, Georgene took time to write a book about her life experiences (see LIFE tab above). She told of climbing trees as a child in Slate Creek, one room schoolhouses, homesteads, helping raise her young brothers, owning and operating her own beauty salon at the age of 19, her beloved dogs, losing her mother, brother, and first husband at tragically young ages, raising a family with her soulmate, traveling, moose hunting, and cherishing her life at Slate Creek with Glen. She closed her book with a reflection on the many relatives, classmates and friends she had lost up to that point:

     "As time goes on we will be less. Those who are here will remember all of those gone, and we will always continue to be a family as this book shows. Through the years we change, but always continue on for the next generation.
     My  love to all of you for the good times and a wish for the peace of a good life to come.
Georgene"
Georgene passed away in her sleep from complications of a stroke she had in early March, 2021. Please help us build this memorial by sharing your condolences and love of Jeanie below. Photos and stories can be shared using the photo GALLERY or STORIES tabs above.

Posted by Dave Clemmons on May 4, 2021
     - Breakfast at Slate Creek -
Pancakes, flapjacks, sourdough,
She’s up early in the morning to mix the dough
Line up folks, there’s plenty for all;
If you’re a late sleeper there’s a second call.

Lots of different folks from other lives and other states
But the Great Equalizer is on your plate.
Here’s a wish I’d like granted, for Auld Lang Syne:
Just to line up for those flapjacks one more time.
Posted by Terri Cummings on May 4, 2021
I have many, many happy memories of my beautiful, strong and sweet Aunt Jeanie. She always had a beautiful smile and was quick with a laugh if something struck her as funny. As a child my late parents Glenn and Donna Maynard took us kids to Kamiah every summer where we would often go to Aunt Jeanie and Glens house next to the cemetery. At that time Uncle Jim, and my late Grandparents Ethebel and Bob Evans lived in Kamiah as well.

Long summer days were spent playing with Neal, Kevin, Laree, my late sister Crystal and my brother Alan in the cemetery and sliding down the laundry shoot to the basement where Grandfather Babe Maynard lived for a time, near Jeanies salon. We would get yelled at by Uncle Glen “you kids get out of the laundry shoot” but somehow we always migrated to it. Glen was usually very intent on building his beautiful mahogany furniture and grandfathers clocks so we would sneak by. One day a tomb stone tumbled over on Laree while we were playing in the cemetery and broke her leg and some of us went running for Jeanie.

We all went on so many fun fishing and camping trips to Buffalo Hump, always Uncle Jim would come. Us kids would bump around in the back of his pick-up during the trip up the hill. Jim and my dad would catch so many trout. Jeanie and my mom Donna would fry them over the campfire. We would sleep in huge army tents that the men would put up. There was a pet bird that also would come with us and he rode in the cab of Jeanie and Glens truck. I think he was a Raven.

When the Wilkins family moved to Slate Creek we came often to visit as well, driving over White Bird hill. One trip we showed up and I don’t think we were expected and Jeanie said to me “Terri come and help me get dinner started” we went out to the yard and she grabbed two chickens by the neck and snapped them around to break their necks, one in each hand. I was about 8 and was pretty stunned by this as she proceeded to chop off their heads and pluck them. When they were ready we brought them into the house and she prepared the best fried chicken dinner with sourdough biscuits and gravy that I have ever eaten.

Family was always very important to Jeanie. My memories of her are forever intertwined with her brothers Glenn and Jim. Sadly we all lost Lyle way to early.

In the early 80’s my parents moved to Slate creek and lived in the house that used to be the country store, across the street and over the bridge. My Dad and Jim initially bought the property together and then Jim paid it off and my parents took care of it and lived happily there for 30 years. Dad was always mowing the lawn and fussing with the pump. My husband Tom and I came every summer for vacation. Jeanie always welcomed us with a pan of her delicious cinnamon rolls. Jim often came down on the weekends from Potlatch to stay in his cabin or trailer. Endless summer days were spent fishing in the creek, drinking beer, BBQ’s and laughing in the Hippie Kitchen. 

Jeanie, Glen, Jim, Donna and Glenn were all very close and loved visiting together and hanging out in the Hippie Kitchen and reminiscing.

They are all gone now and will forever live on in our hearts and memories.
Posted by Donald Frazier on May 3, 2021
Wow...where to begin. As a child Georgene and Glen were like my other mom and dad-and Laree, Kevin and Neal were siblings. I remember when Neal and I went up Highway 162 without permission and Jeannie hunted us down in that Lincoln with the suicide doors-she was furious-I recall protesting that she could not spank me since she was not my mom...I really got spanked then! We used to take little hikes up to the point and Jeannie would pack us a lunch. I remember her canning things-Glen could do anything. He was so resourceful I used to joke with my sisters later in life about Glen doing brain surgery at home on Neal with a soldering iron-LOL! He could do anything-he had leftover car paint? So he becomes an artist painting portraits. His wood work-I still own a magazine rack he made. He painted my '57 Chevy. Georgene and Glen were always in these amazing log houses they were continuously building and improving. Georgene-such a stunning beauty-and my mom's love for her dearest friend goes beyond mere verbal description. It is heartbreaking for my mother, Joyce, but she knows the same Jesus Georgene does so she knows this is only a temporary separation. I spent so much time at her house as a child, and the Wilkins logged many hours at our house. Such fond memories. Such a wonderful family. I will never forget Jeannie's warm smile, her sweet laugh, and her love for me as a boy only another mother could muster. My heart goes out to Kevin, Neal and Laree, as does my thanksgiving for allowing me to be a part of your special family. Your family must have spilled over into mine as my middle name is Glen, and my sisters'' middle names are "Jean" and "Laree." God bless you in Jesus' name and thank you for this wonderful tribute!
Posted by Edward Gerard on May 3, 2021
Georgene disliked flying as much as Glen disliked leaving the comfort and beauty of their beloved Slate Creek property.

We were, therefore, so pleased to have convinced them not once but THREE times to go out of their comfort zones and visit Kevin and me when we lived in Honolulu and New York City and for a dream trip to our nation's capitol.

The fact that Laree, Shaun, Kaleala and Kaleb were able to join them on some of those trips made our experiences that much more enjoyable and memorable.

I will always treasure our time together on those trips and our wonderful memories and experiences.

Here are a few of my favorites...

I am sure that you join me in thinking that the last people that you would ever expect to put on bathing suits, scuba masks, snorkels and fins to snorkel with the fish in Hawaii would be Georgene and Glen! But, they were troopers and happily agreed to do so. They even thoroughly enjoyed it! Picture it in your mind...

Georgene embraced our relaxed island attitude even when her handbag was stolen from our car with her money, ID, and medicine while visiting a site. She rolled with it and laughed her characteristic laugh and said that the scoundrels probably needed her nitroglycerin more than she did! She even loved the experience of reporting the incident to the handsome Honolulu Police Department officers!

How Glen, Georgene, Laree, Kaleala, Kaleb, Kevin and I lived for a week in our small two bedroom, one bathroom apartment in New York City during that trip is still a mystery! But, oh what fun!

We thought that the whole group would enjoy the experience of taking the subway during the New York City trip. Before doing so, though, we forewarned everyone that subway riders don't speak to each other nor look each other in the eyes generally so it wouldn't be a good idea to do so. Well... We all know that Georgene could never pass up an opportunity to talk! We weren't on the train but a minute before she was introducing herself to those strangers in her proximity and telling them about being from Idaho and how much she was enjoying her trip. Are you surprised?

While on our trip to Washington DC, we were fortunate to have the opportunity to visit the White House. The trip was shortly after Obama was inaugurated for the first time. Everyone who knows Georgene knows her politics. After the tour of the White House, we asked how she liked it. She said that she was counting the number of images of the Bushes on display and she was convinced that there were more images of Democrats than Republicans much to her chagrin! No surprise there!

I will always treasure the memories from those trips which are too many to share here.

Mostly I am forever grateful for how Georgene and Glen welcomed me to the family and to their beloved Slate Creek.

They will be forever missed! 


Posted by L Bass on May 2, 2021
This has not gotten any easier this week. Mom would appreciate that over 80 people have looked at this beautiful tribute in just 2 days. She was the talker in the family and loved all of your wonderful and timely phone calls to her over the years and the drop by visits. One of the things she said several times in the last 6 weeks was that she "loves everybody." We know she is at peace now and no longer suffering the miseries of that terrible stroke. I think she would like me to tell you all for her, "Please take care of your health" so you to can live to be 89!
Posted by Jacki Bebb on May 1, 2021
What a beautiful tribute to your Mother. Sending our deepest sympathy to Kevin and his family.
Posted by Ian Nichols on May 1, 2021
The kindest person I knew.
Posted by Kevin Wilkins on April 28, 2021
In 2015, at Dad's service, I reflected on how much he believed in himself, and what a great influence that was on us. As I reflect on growing up with Mom, what comes to mind is how much she believed in US. She genuinely believed that each of us could be President, but only if it would make us happy. I'm grateful for her belief in me, and the freedom she gave us to be ourselves.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Dave Clemmons on May 4, 2021
     - Breakfast at Slate Creek -
Pancakes, flapjacks, sourdough,
She’s up early in the morning to mix the dough
Line up folks, there’s plenty for all;
If you’re a late sleeper there’s a second call.

Lots of different folks from other lives and other states
But the Great Equalizer is on your plate.
Here’s a wish I’d like granted, for Auld Lang Syne:
Just to line up for those flapjacks one more time.
Posted by Terri Cummings on May 4, 2021
I have many, many happy memories of my beautiful, strong and sweet Aunt Jeanie. She always had a beautiful smile and was quick with a laugh if something struck her as funny. As a child my late parents Glenn and Donna Maynard took us kids to Kamiah every summer where we would often go to Aunt Jeanie and Glens house next to the cemetery. At that time Uncle Jim, and my late Grandparents Ethebel and Bob Evans lived in Kamiah as well.

Long summer days were spent playing with Neal, Kevin, Laree, my late sister Crystal and my brother Alan in the cemetery and sliding down the laundry shoot to the basement where Grandfather Babe Maynard lived for a time, near Jeanies salon. We would get yelled at by Uncle Glen “you kids get out of the laundry shoot” but somehow we always migrated to it. Glen was usually very intent on building his beautiful mahogany furniture and grandfathers clocks so we would sneak by. One day a tomb stone tumbled over on Laree while we were playing in the cemetery and broke her leg and some of us went running for Jeanie.

We all went on so many fun fishing and camping trips to Buffalo Hump, always Uncle Jim would come. Us kids would bump around in the back of his pick-up during the trip up the hill. Jim and my dad would catch so many trout. Jeanie and my mom Donna would fry them over the campfire. We would sleep in huge army tents that the men would put up. There was a pet bird that also would come with us and he rode in the cab of Jeanie and Glens truck. I think he was a Raven.

When the Wilkins family moved to Slate Creek we came often to visit as well, driving over White Bird hill. One trip we showed up and I don’t think we were expected and Jeanie said to me “Terri come and help me get dinner started” we went out to the yard and she grabbed two chickens by the neck and snapped them around to break their necks, one in each hand. I was about 8 and was pretty stunned by this as she proceeded to chop off their heads and pluck them. When they were ready we brought them into the house and she prepared the best fried chicken dinner with sourdough biscuits and gravy that I have ever eaten.

Family was always very important to Jeanie. My memories of her are forever intertwined with her brothers Glenn and Jim. Sadly we all lost Lyle way to early.

In the early 80’s my parents moved to Slate creek and lived in the house that used to be the country store, across the street and over the bridge. My Dad and Jim initially bought the property together and then Jim paid it off and my parents took care of it and lived happily there for 30 years. Dad was always mowing the lawn and fussing with the pump. My husband Tom and I came every summer for vacation. Jeanie always welcomed us with a pan of her delicious cinnamon rolls. Jim often came down on the weekends from Potlatch to stay in his cabin or trailer. Endless summer days were spent fishing in the creek, drinking beer, BBQ’s and laughing in the Hippie Kitchen. 

Jeanie, Glen, Jim, Donna and Glenn were all very close and loved visiting together and hanging out in the Hippie Kitchen and reminiscing.

They are all gone now and will forever live on in our hearts and memories.
Posted by Donald Frazier on May 3, 2021
Wow...where to begin. As a child Georgene and Glen were like my other mom and dad-and Laree, Kevin and Neal were siblings. I remember when Neal and I went up Highway 162 without permission and Jeannie hunted us down in that Lincoln with the suicide doors-she was furious-I recall protesting that she could not spank me since she was not my mom...I really got spanked then! We used to take little hikes up to the point and Jeannie would pack us a lunch. I remember her canning things-Glen could do anything. He was so resourceful I used to joke with my sisters later in life about Glen doing brain surgery at home on Neal with a soldering iron-LOL! He could do anything-he had leftover car paint? So he becomes an artist painting portraits. His wood work-I still own a magazine rack he made. He painted my '57 Chevy. Georgene and Glen were always in these amazing log houses they were continuously building and improving. Georgene-such a stunning beauty-and my mom's love for her dearest friend goes beyond mere verbal description. It is heartbreaking for my mother, Joyce, but she knows the same Jesus Georgene does so she knows this is only a temporary separation. I spent so much time at her house as a child, and the Wilkins logged many hours at our house. Such fond memories. Such a wonderful family. I will never forget Jeannie's warm smile, her sweet laugh, and her love for me as a boy only another mother could muster. My heart goes out to Kevin, Neal and Laree, as does my thanksgiving for allowing me to be a part of your special family. Your family must have spilled over into mine as my middle name is Glen, and my sisters'' middle names are "Jean" and "Laree." God bless you in Jesus' name and thank you for this wonderful tribute!
her Life

"My Book" Autobiography; Written in 2005 & 2011: Chapter 1

I have long considered writing a book, so beings I will be 73 in a few more weeks and to every thing a season now is the time for me to start this long tale of my life as I remember the events as they happened or as my brain remembers them occurring, whichever it may be.

I am waiting as usual for spring to come, it seems it has been a long winter and I love the outdoors and the warm days to just sit and watch the creek. We live by  Slate Creek which gently flows to the river nearby, beings we live at the mouth of the creek we have a river nearby that it spills into. A beautiful river which has  fishermen lining its banks for many miles in the spring and again in the fall hoping to catch a steel head or a trout on their long lines.

As a child I have spent many hours fishing so I know that wonderful time a person can have as they spend their time hanging on to a line and balancing on a rock and moving that hook around just right so that fish will soon grab on and the thrill of landing it out of the water as to not losing it back into the water.

My life started not far from here, my folks lived on the mountain near here, during the 1930’s life was poor here for money but rich in  many other ways.  My parents, a young couple married in 1929.  I was born in Lewiston, Idaho Feb. 4, 1932  the first child and only daughter of Babe and Grace Maynard. My mother traveled to Lewiston to stay with her family before I was born, she was in St. Joseph Hospital waiting for me to be born, all was well until I decided to get out of there and no Dr. on hand so the Catholic nurses held towels up so I could not enter the world till the Dr. arrived, of course by the time he did get there my Mothers body had stopped all contractions and I was black but alive, I was a small child, but healthy, I have since wondered if my delayed birth is why I never like to be late for anything! While we were in the hospital awaiting my birth my Father was making his way across  the Grangeville prairie in a snowstorm behind a snow plow which was clearing the roadway, but wind blowing so much the snow was a foot deep for my Dad’s truck to  pass through. With 4 feet of snow in the area there was a lot of snow to blow. After my birth we traveled back to Salmon River to our house on the Mountain. 

"My Book" Autobiography; Chapter 2

My father found many ways to get his family taken care of, he made wood to sell, deer season was a time for hunting and he worked in a remote area for the US Forest Service on a lookout, Called Black Butte Lookout. It was a long way out from other lookouts, it overlooked the Big Salmon River area and was able to see to the north area  being  able to patrol the  whole area for forest fires.

Now that job has been removed  and done by airplanes touring over the land for fires, especially after a thunderstorm.

My father told of the times the storms would rage over the mountains and lightning coming in so close to the lookout that the high cabin on the lookout in the sky, would entirely light up. The cabins were equipped with lightning rods anchored to the ground so being in the cabin during a storm was the safest place to be, but sounds a little frightening to me. 

The people on the nearby lookouts would call each other  reporting  any fires they saw  by using  telephones  they would ring up a call with a hand  crank to fellow  workers on another mountain to report any fires they could see from their advantage point

During the quiet times, between storms,  it was a lonely place, chipmunks  coming to visit on the nearby huge boulders near the lookout would come to feed on scraps of bread that was put out by my father, these little animals would become pets of his and he enjoyed them very much. 

A packer carrying strawberries up the mountain could sell one strawberry for a $1.00  and as he made his way from one lookout to another which was miles apart he would sell all he had.

My Uncle Jack  also worked on a Lookout called Sawyers Ridge Lookout,  which has now been removed from the forest and our neighbors use it for an artist cabin to do her art projects in, it is now again on a mountain but visible from Highway 95 in Central Idaho at Slate Creek.

"My Book" Autobiography; Chapter 3

While my father worked on the lookouts in the summer months I and my mother lived on the mountain, which was nearer to my Grandparents but still several miles away from anyone.  Mom’s brothers were young men and they would stay with us as the times were bad in the country during the depression years.

Once we came home from a shopping time in a village, miles away it seemed, when we had to travel either by horse or an old car, possibly a Model T Ford. We have a picture of this old pickup but not sure if it is a Ford or a Chevy.

As we came in the door of our house we heard the awful grunting sound of an animal. It was bumping into something behind a closed door in our kitchen. I can remember being kind of scared as to what that sound could possibly be. My mother always kept our house so very  clean, so when we finally got the kitchen door open, we found the old sow pig had pushed open the back door got into our kitchen and had pushed the door shut  made a real stinky mess in my mom’s kitchen, she had stinky pig poop all over the room plus all the mess she made scattering our things.

Our place was in the timber and cougars lived back in the woods. We would hear cougars screaming in the night and their screams echoing across the mountain was a scary thing to listen to. In later years the howl of my Siamese cat would send shivers up my back, finally decided that long ago memory of cougar screams in the night could be what I was  reminded of.
Recent stories

Sourdough Pancakes

Shared by Kevin Wilkins on April 30, 2021
Sourdough pancakes were a way of life at our house. We had them every morning that I can remember. It would be easier to remember the times we didn't. Mom's starter and the old crock it live in were family members! It was everyone's job to make sure we remembered to "do the sourdough" every night. We'd mix it up and tuck it in for night with a dishtowel wrapped around the lid. Every morning it was sitting there on the kitchen counter faithfully waiting for us. Mom knew who liked the hot-off-the-press ones and who liked the limp ones (showing no bias here...). After breakfast the crock went back in the fridge. And so it went.

Almost everyone I've talked to since Mom's passing mentioned "Georgene's sourdough". What is your memory - sourdough or otherwise?

A Mother's Love

Shared by Kevin Wilkins on May 2, 2021
An excerpt from Mom's life story (Chapter 20):
"Kevin was born Oct. 1, 1967. My nurse that day said “your husband will have to claim this one because of those dimples the baby has“ and she was right.  Glen also has those dimples. Kevin was a wonderful little boy. Even when he blew up and tore all his covers off his bed."
I did have a temper. Mom always said it came from the her side of the family (the Maynards and the Painters). I'm happy she was willing to give me a genetic excuse. I'll never know why she didn't take a switch to me! My bed was always made that night, and we moved on. I think I stopped doing that by the time we moved to Slate Creek when I was 8. But for the record, I did always feel bad about doing that. It must explain why I make the bed now when I am mad. haha!