ForeverMissed

Hi Everyone,

This is a memorial site for us to share stories and pictures about each of our different and unique relationships with Jeff through different times of his life.  It is my hope that by sharing this with each other we get to see a little more about of Jeff then we knew before and re-live some of the great memories of hanging out with him and growing up with him.

And by sharing your stories, short or long, your pictures, one or many, you will give the winners of the Jeff Brock Award* some insights into Jeff's character, his life, the type of man he was and the honour bestowed upon them.

Thanks for sharing and enjoy what you see about Jeff.

* for more information about the award under Jeff's name please see the "His Life" tab above.

Cheers,
Grant Lawrence
Comm '86 

Note: this is an open site, one that is not going to be actively administrated so please be cautious about people's privacy.  May I suggest that if you are going to post a picture and it has other people in it, other than Jeff, that you give those individuals a heads-up and ask their permission. 

Posted by Mike Dodd on September 6, 2016
I studied with Jeff for about 3 years at University and was very sad to hear some years later that he'd died. I recall a confident, fun and caring young fellow who made time to engage with and listen to others and took a genuine interest in making our time at University a great time for all. He left all our lives a little better than they were.
That's how I'll always remember him.
Mike

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Mike Dodd on September 6, 2016
I studied with Jeff for about 3 years at University and was very sad to hear some years later that he'd died. I recall a confident, fun and caring young fellow who made time to engage with and listen to others and took a genuine interest in making our time at University a great time for all. He left all our lives a little better than they were.
That's how I'll always remember him.
Mike
Recent stories

Corolla in a Snow Storm

Shared by Mike McKeon on October 6, 2016

Sorry, my story's a bit late to the party; something Jeff would never let happen!
Alvin's picture of the Corolla inspired me.  Always a generous guy, Jeff allowed me to borrow his corolla for a weekend in Montreal; hard to recall the pre-cell phone / pre-nav system era.  Heading back to Kingston's Bagot street Sunday night I accidently took what I think must have been Hwy 417 vs 401 not realizing my mistake until I reached Ottawa.  Battling a blinding snow storm, something I'd never do now but it seemed perfectly reasonable then, I finally arrived home in Kingston at 3am. Thinking I'd get a couple hours sleep before an 8am class was naive; Jeff was waiting worried for my safe return.  After admonishing my poor judgement, a beer and a short nap I somehow dragged my feet to class knowing Jeff was in my corner.  Of course, I had already known that then and since too many times to count.  Jeff's early acceptance, onoing supportive freindship and loving family are integral to my life. Thank you Jeff, Marg, Caley, Cooper & Megan. 

Outer Banks - 1990

Shared by Doug Collins on September 11, 2016

During the summer of 1990 and on the advice of Grant Lawrence - an avid windsurfer - a group of us planned a holiday at North Carolina's Outer Banks, renting a large beach house. Over two weeks many family, friends and Queen's Alumni visited including Grant and Sue Lawrence, Bruce Usher, and Jeff & Marg Brock. We had a great time in this simpler pre-children era, with days spent on the beach and evenings on the deck watching the sun go down over grilled seafood and (many) liquid refreshments.

Jeff kept up a frantic pace of activities, including rounds of beach paddleball during the day, enjoying Blizzards at a conveniently located Dairy Queen, and cigars to finish the evening off. He was keenly interested in those around him, and wasn't shy in telling us about his plans. As guests at the beach house numbered 12-15 at any time this meant lots of interesting, and often spirited, conversations, with Jeff inevitably at the centre of it.

On the last night of the trip we bought shrimp from a local seafood shop and grilled them on the BBQ...delicious. Early the next morning everyone headed north for the long drive back to Toronto, Ottawa, etc. As Helena and I headed north it started to rain heavily and late that night we finally arrived back in TO, exhausted.

The next morning we awoke feeling violently ill, and the phone rang. It turned out that (1) the shrimp we'd enjoyed was bad and everyone who ate it had food poisoning, and (2) Hurricane Bob was pummeling the Outer Banks and a mandatory evacuation of the area had been announced shortly after we left. Blissfully unaware in our beach house in those days before the Internet, we hadn't the slightest clue.

For the next 24 hours we suffered through the after effects of the shrimp and - as usual - Jeff caused the most excitement having been admitted to the ER in Buffalo with food poisoning. I haven't really enjoyed shrimp since.

As the years went by, we took other vacations with Jeff, as our families and responsibilities grew, and I'll never forget the enthusiasm and energy he applied to all aspects of his life, and the fun we had together. 

Jeff in New York

Shared by Bruce Usher on August 31, 2016

I recall how amazed I was when Jeff told me during the spring of our senior year at Queen’s that he had received an offer to work as an analyst at Salomon Brothers in New York City. This was a big deal. As far we could tell, no Queen’s Commie had ever been offered a job at ‘Sollies’ head office right after graduating. And no investment bank was more representative of Wall Street in the go-go ‘80’s than the legendary Salomon Brothers.

I was really proud of Jeff both for getting the job offer and for not being afraid to take it. New York City was a scary place in those days, and in many ways working for a place like Salomon was even scarier… they had a reputation for aggressiveness that was legendary. When Jeff moved to New York, I moved to Tokyo, and so we didn’t see each other for a while. But in 1988 I had to travel to New York, and Jeff insisted I stay at his apartment for the few days I was there, affording us the opportunity to catch up.

When I saw Jeff, he regaled me with stories of living and working in New York, but the one story that I remember best had to do with a lost shoe. Actually, Jeff’s lost shoe. What Jeff told me was that on his way to work at Solomon one morning he stepped onto the subway at the very moment that his penny loafer (remember how we all wore those?) fell off his foot. Not only did his shoe come off, but it managed to do so just as he was stepping into the subway car, thereby falling into the narrow space between the subway platform and the subway car. Jeff stepped out of the subway car and waited for the train to leave, then peered down from the platform and spotted his shoe lying next to the track. I asked Jeff what he did at that point, to which he replied “of course I jumped down onto the subway tracks, picked up my shoe, and climbed back onto the platform before the next train pulled in; that was less scary than the thought of showing up at Salomon Brothers wearing only one shoe!”

Jeff was always a lot of fun to be friends with. He did many crazy things, but always with the best of intentions. I miss him.