ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory J.  Mark King who died peacefully at his longtime home on June 22, 2020 in Aaronsburg, PA at the age of 86 surrounded by his family. 

Mark is survived b his children Kristina and her husband Warren Leitzel of Sumner, Maine; Faith King of Aaronsburg, PA, Betty Lou and her husband Dave Klingensmith, Jr. of Parkesburg, PA; Rick King of Washington, DC, and Carl David King and his wife Sarah of North Bend, WA.  He is also survived by his nine grandchildren Kristin, Jasmine, Maeve, Jonas, Marcy, Ben, Isaiah, Jaxson and Oliver.  He was preceded in death by his wife Carrie (7/22/2003) and all eight of his siblings. 

Mark touched so many lives, so his passing at this time in history makes celebrating his life and legacy challenging.  The family plans a celebration of his life and legacy at a later date In the summer of 2020.  Those who wish can make donations in memory of Mark to organizations he was passionate about at the following addresses:

Southern Poverty Law Center:https://donate.splcenter.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=1367
The Audubon Society:https://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/ETrj4YbAaEqSi8vAxski2w2?ms=giving_page_281
University Mennonite Church Music Committee 1606 Norma Street State College, PA 16801

Flowers and condolences may be sent to c/o Faith King 122 Vine Street Aaronsburg, PA 16820.

We will remember him forever.
Posted by Crist Peachey on July 9, 2020
When I remember my Uncle Mark there are three themes that come to mind:
Men’s religious music.
The Pittsburg Pirates.
Sharing a good story.

Uncle Mark shared a passion for music with my father. Both of them sang in various men’s choirs and quartets. Both led various choirs both men’s and mixed voice choirs. It was Uncle Mark who convinced my dad to take our family out to Laurelville Mennonite Church camp for Music Week one summer. At this camp we practiced and performed Alice Parker’s Martyrs Mirror. It was also at this camp where I remember hearing different types of church music that I had not heard before. I will be forever grateful to my Uncle for the part he played in opening up my world.

The day Roberto Clemente’s plane went down was a sad day for my Uncle Mark. Through Uncle Mark I learned about one of baseball’s all-time great center fielders. I have fond memories of watching and listening to Pirate baseball as only Bob Prince could call it. We shared a love for Willie Stargel, Dave Parker, John Candeleria, the “Goose”, and Kent Tekulve to name just a few of the Pirate greats.

I suppose Uncle Mark’s training as an elementary school teacher made him a safe person for a young boy growing up to express himself albeit foolishly at times. It was in the company of my Uncle Mark that I developed my gift of telling a good story and also the joy of listening to him tell good stories. On one particular occasion I listened as Mark told my dad a story of a farmer trimming his apple trees when he slipped and found himself hanging from the crotch of a branch by his neck. “As his life flashed before him, he remembered that he had voted for Harry Truman. It made him feel so small, he slipped from the crotch and his life was saved.”

Uncle Mark due to your influence in my life as a young person growing up, I am able to navigate life better. For that I will be forever grateful to you. Rest now and enjoy those things that you sang about in this life.


Posted by Carolyn Rudy on July 4, 2020
Uncle Mark was married to my dad's sister, Carrie. His love for music had his family attending music week at Laurelville Mennonite Church camp every year. One year, he encouraged our family to attend. What great memories. A specific dear memory I have of that summer is unrelated to music but rather to the English language. Mark, being an elementary grade teacher, lovingly taught me to think about and substitute a better descriptive word for the food I was tasting in the diningroom. Instead of proclaiming "this is TERRIBLE good", as i was taught in my area to say, Uncle Mark asked me what the waitress would think I thought of the food, if she only heard that first adjective 'terrible?' Aha, Uncle Mark.....a better word would be VERY good. Yes, very good! Now isn't that better all around? And nary a shame was felt. Thank you, Uncle Mark!!
Posted by Audrey Hartzler Eby on July 4, 2020
Mark and my dad were cousins, and so I knew Mark from family gatherings as well as other occasions.  Some specific memories are him encouraging me to sing a soprano solo when he taught music at BMS in early 1960's.  Then he and Carrie sang a beautiful duet at our wedding in 1970.  In later years, he shared family genealogy facts with me when genealogy became my interest.  He contributed much to the lives of all who knew him.
Posted by Evelyn King on June 28, 2020
Uncle Mark was my favorite Uncle. He was my dad’s brother and married my mom’s sister. When he arrived at family gatherings, he would make the rounds and greet each one of us, (and there were many). After Aunt Carrie passed, he made the best of his situation and was a true example of how to live with his loss. Later in life, when just he and his sister Ida were left, he made weekly trips (or nearly weekly) from Aaronsburg to Allensville to pick her up and they had lunch together at Taste Of the Valley in Belleville. He made the most of the time they had left. He had a wonderful sense of humor and told many interesting stories from the past. And he made the BEST coffee! Yes, I will miss uncle Mark, but am glad he can be reunited with his family. For those who belong to Jesus, death is a victory!!!!!
Posted by Deb Leisey on June 27, 2020
I enjoyed a good cup of coffee out of my Aaronsburg Pottery mug in honor of your Dad. Remembering the hospitality of your Mom and Dad. Enjoying the music and singing of all of us. Memories will live on forever!
Posted by Matt Stover on June 25, 2020
Many a day was spent in the King's yard. What ever the daily activity would be never a word was uttered of concern for the garden or trees that were present. I am sure that some of the vegetables produced never made there way to the table due to the ever present summer wiffleball games played in the yard. There are too many found memories to ramble on. Mr. King was a man that many could only wish to be as virtuous. May the family find peace in knowing their father has been reunited with his wife in heaven.
Posted by Barbara Long on June 25, 2020
Mark will always have a special place in my heart. When I was a teenager in the 1960's my German mother sold World Book Encyclopedia to Mark and Carrie. A warm friendship developed that lasted until his passing. Mark was there for me during the times of my brother's drug and alcohol abuse. Mark and Carrie sang at my husband's and my wedding at Penn State in 1981. Mark even consented to be one of the executors of my mother's will. All of this I wrote in my recent memoir Bittersweet Memories.
Posted by Wesley King on June 24, 2020
When my father, Glen King, Mark's brother, passed away in 1975, Uncle Mark came to our farm and played ball with my siblings and I, a number of times over the next couple of years. Uncle Mark also took me hunting that year (1975) and the next few years. We enjoyed having Mark at our family gatherings and listening to his stories. Thanks to the family for sharing your father with us during our difficult times. Precious memories.
Posted by Margaret Neer on June 24, 2020
Mark made music more vibrant and joy filled. I was privileged to sing under his direction in classrooms, choirs, and congregations.
Posted by Tamie Veith on June 23, 2020
He was the second non-work person I met in State College. What a difference he and Carrie made in my life! They welcomed me to the church, to singing, and to enjoying ice cream with their family. They both always noticed me! What a blessing. Mark made such a difference in the life of so many creatures. Hugs and love to you all!!
Posted by Hillel Brandes on June 23, 2020
Mark was most welcoming and generous, and his hospitality noted as well! We sure shared some good times! He introduced me to several unique locations for birdwatching. We did quite a number of trips together, sometimes repeat trips to the same location, but one location we traveled to many times, and it has become a special place for me. I will always think of him anytime I travel there. It’s like I’ll never be birding alone there, now. He was always ready to do the next trip, so I only ever felt that he genuinely enjoyed our times together as well. We always had good times, whether traveling together or simply sitting on his back porch! He will be forever missed!
Posted by Brian Kononchuk on June 23, 2020
I have so many wonderful memories. So many that it would be impossible to pick a favorite one. I can say this however. He was such a positive influence and force in my life, and I know for sure that I couldn't be the father, husband, or friend that I am today without him. He was the best example of how to grow old with grace. His life is a tribute to everything that can be good in this world.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Crist Peachey on July 9, 2020
When I remember my Uncle Mark there are three themes that come to mind:
Men’s religious music.
The Pittsburg Pirates.
Sharing a good story.

Uncle Mark shared a passion for music with my father. Both of them sang in various men’s choirs and quartets. Both led various choirs both men’s and mixed voice choirs. It was Uncle Mark who convinced my dad to take our family out to Laurelville Mennonite Church camp for Music Week one summer. At this camp we practiced and performed Alice Parker’s Martyrs Mirror. It was also at this camp where I remember hearing different types of church music that I had not heard before. I will be forever grateful to my Uncle for the part he played in opening up my world.

The day Roberto Clemente’s plane went down was a sad day for my Uncle Mark. Through Uncle Mark I learned about one of baseball’s all-time great center fielders. I have fond memories of watching and listening to Pirate baseball as only Bob Prince could call it. We shared a love for Willie Stargel, Dave Parker, John Candeleria, the “Goose”, and Kent Tekulve to name just a few of the Pirate greats.

I suppose Uncle Mark’s training as an elementary school teacher made him a safe person for a young boy growing up to express himself albeit foolishly at times. It was in the company of my Uncle Mark that I developed my gift of telling a good story and also the joy of listening to him tell good stories. On one particular occasion I listened as Mark told my dad a story of a farmer trimming his apple trees when he slipped and found himself hanging from the crotch of a branch by his neck. “As his life flashed before him, he remembered that he had voted for Harry Truman. It made him feel so small, he slipped from the crotch and his life was saved.”

Uncle Mark due to your influence in my life as a young person growing up, I am able to navigate life better. For that I will be forever grateful to you. Rest now and enjoy those things that you sang about in this life.


Posted by Carolyn Rudy on July 4, 2020
Uncle Mark was married to my dad's sister, Carrie. His love for music had his family attending music week at Laurelville Mennonite Church camp every year. One year, he encouraged our family to attend. What great memories. A specific dear memory I have of that summer is unrelated to music but rather to the English language. Mark, being an elementary grade teacher, lovingly taught me to think about and substitute a better descriptive word for the food I was tasting in the diningroom. Instead of proclaiming "this is TERRIBLE good", as i was taught in my area to say, Uncle Mark asked me what the waitress would think I thought of the food, if she only heard that first adjective 'terrible?' Aha, Uncle Mark.....a better word would be VERY good. Yes, very good! Now isn't that better all around? And nary a shame was felt. Thank you, Uncle Mark!!
Posted by Audrey Hartzler Eby on July 4, 2020
Mark and my dad were cousins, and so I knew Mark from family gatherings as well as other occasions.  Some specific memories are him encouraging me to sing a soprano solo when he taught music at BMS in early 1960's.  Then he and Carrie sang a beautiful duet at our wedding in 1970.  In later years, he shared family genealogy facts with me when genealogy became my interest.  He contributed much to the lives of all who knew him.
his Life

Mark’s Brief Life Story

Mark was born on August 31, 1933 in Allensville, PA to Archie and Lizzie Mae King - the second youngest of 9 children. He became the first in his immediate family to attend and graduate from Penn State University in 1964 with a Bachelor of Science in Education.  He continued on to obtain his Master of Education in Elementary Education in 1970. He married Carrie Irene Peachey in 1959 then started a family and moved to Centre County.  Raising their new family there he worked for the State College School District in Lemont and then Houserville Elementary Schools until he retired in 1996 after 36 years of teaching.  

He shared his passions with all of us in different ways:  leading choruses in Centre, Mifflin and Union counties, singing in the State College Chorale Society, birdwatching, gardening, genealogy, amateur wine enthusiast, grading papers at The Corner Room and virtually anything musical.  His loves were varied and found a home in the hearts of each and every one who knew and loved him in different ways.

Those fortunate enough to have known Mark understood that his life - at its core - was dedicated to others.  Whether it was his family, his community, his friends or his church he never let an opportunity to help others go to waste.  Please join us in celebrating his life here by sharing your personal memories, stories, pictures and anecdotes.  

Recent stories

Known in Kathmandu!

Shared by Carmen Groff on June 23, 2020
Tina King Leitzel, I didn’t really know your dad very well but I wanted to share this with you. Over 2 years ago, I was in Kathmandu Nepal, sitting in a coffee shop speaking with the owner who is an American.  He has lived his adult life in Nepal. He went to Penn State in the 70’s and learned to know your dad during that time. He spoke very highly of your dad and was pleased that I knew of him and that he was still living at that time. 
Thought you would like to know your dad was spoken of fondly all the way around the world in Kathmandu!
Shared by Sandy Telegraphis on June 23, 2020
Tina
I was so sorry to hear about the loss of your Dad. I feel blessed to have had the opportunity to have known such a thoughtful and talented man. Growing up, I remember we went to the school where he was teaching and were playing on scooters. I had put the antique signet ring my Grandmother had given me on the heater so nothing would happen to it. Being a typical, forgetful 12 year old girl, I forgot to put it back on before we left. Your Dad tracked it down and returned it to me! Thanks to your Dad, I have worn that ring for many years and have it to pass down to my granddaughter! I hope you and your family find comfort in the wonderful memories you have shared. Heaven has certainly gotten one very special angel! You and your faare in my thoughts and prayers ❤️ 
Sandy McLaughlinTelegraphis