ForeverMissed

John Stewart, II, “Jack”, 21 year resident of Mullica Hill, passed on Nov. 27, 2016.

Loving father of Ashley and Colin and their mother, his cherished wife, Catherine Stewart of 28 years, dear father of Suzanne and Jack Stewart and survived by their mother Pat Lambiase. Devoted grandfather of Leah Hnosko and Kimmie, Eden, Alec and Ryan Miller. He was predeceased by his parents Amelda and John DeWayne Stewart.

Above all, John was a devoted, passionate caring man who whole-heartedly cherished his family and friends, giving endlessly to those he loved. He believed that love was giving all that you have until there was nothing left, and then our spirit would be set free. John lived his life accordingly.

John was an Associate Professor with a PhD and taught History for over 45 years at Camden County College. He sought knowledge for its' own sake, constantly exploring the workings of the mind and the universe itself. 

John was a scholar, writer and poet, with a rare intellect whose knowledge and imagination knew no bounds. In reflection of his self,  "If I see further than others, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants. But even then, I feel as if a child upon the seashore while the great ocean of truth lay undiscovered before me."

John's journey has not ended. He will forever seek the truth and touch the souls of others. We all have been blessed that he has touched ours. He will remain forever and always in our hearts.

Services will be private at the convenience of the family.

To honor John, in lieu of flowers, contributions made in the name of “Gift of Love Education Fund” PO Box 473, Mullica Hill, NJ 08062-0473 would be greatly appreciated.


Posted by Harry West on November 5, 2018
I was talking about Dr Stewart to an associate of mine about his knowledge of American History and the tid bits he passed on to me about some of our founding fathers. I decided to look him up and found not only that he passed 2 years ago but that while living in Barnsboro for 27 years he was living in town next door. What a shame. I would have loved to stop by and see him again. That man touched me like very few have ever done besides my father. His example of courage to do what he believe in set an example that I still follow today. DR D, thank you for being my friend when a young man needed help finding his way in a new school and environment. I think of you often. And now its too late to tell you what you meant to me. Good bye my friend.
Posted by Tina Lacava on November 27, 2017
One year later, I am sure your family misses you each and every day. It is without a shred of doubt I believe you are searching, seeking, and discovering amazing and wonderful things more grand than any of our imaginations could conceive. Enjoy your journey; remember us here in the tangible.
Posted by Ash Ley on December 31, 2016
I love you and miss you everyday <3 I wish i could have returned the love and dedication as a father that you gave me as your daughter, but i will not live in regret only rejoice in the happy times you gave me and the light you brought into my life!
Posted by Tina Lacava on December 2, 2016
I was privileged to have taken some classes taught by John Stewart back in the 90’s. He was imaginative, controversial, inspiring, but most of all brilliant.
He once said (upon the death of one of his own teachers) that one of the most important things a teacher could know was that he'd made a difference in any student’s life; that he’d had a positive effect on them. Well, John, I can tell you that you had a great effect on my life and on my husband’s life. You certainly made a difference; you forced people to think!
May The Lord bless you in your new home with so many answers you sought after; and may He give you a whole new field of discovery!

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Harry West on November 5, 2018
I was talking about Dr Stewart to an associate of mine about his knowledge of American History and the tid bits he passed on to me about some of our founding fathers. I decided to look him up and found not only that he passed 2 years ago but that while living in Barnsboro for 27 years he was living in town next door. What a shame. I would have loved to stop by and see him again. That man touched me like very few have ever done besides my father. His example of courage to do what he believe in set an example that I still follow today. DR D, thank you for being my friend when a young man needed help finding his way in a new school and environment. I think of you often. And now its too late to tell you what you meant to me. Good bye my friend.
Posted by Tina Lacava on November 27, 2017
One year later, I am sure your family misses you each and every day. It is without a shred of doubt I believe you are searching, seeking, and discovering amazing and wonderful things more grand than any of our imaginations could conceive. Enjoy your journey; remember us here in the tangible.
Posted by Ash Ley on December 31, 2016
I love you and miss you everyday <3 I wish i could have returned the love and dedication as a father that you gave me as your daughter, but i will not live in regret only rejoice in the happy times you gave me and the light you brought into my life!
Recent stories

Impact teacher

Shared by Larry Hansen on February 17, 2020
I took Professor Stewart’s class History of Western Civilization in 1971. His style of delivery was unlike anything I ever experienced. Forceful, profound, theatrical, and captivating and I’ll never forget F I T C H. He used this to describe history; facts, ideas, terminology, chronology, and historiography. It’s been almost 50 years and I still remember his clever methods of exciting the art of education.  Bravo Professor Stewart. You influenced too many to mention 

The Professor and Me.

Shared by Leon Romberg on December 28, 2017

In 1977, I left high school mid-way through the year wondering if I would fit in anywhere, much less college.  In high school, I was bored and a fidget.  I did well in history, choir, and theater, but little else.  I decided to try a class at Camden County College to see if I could tolerate college.  Also to see if college could tolerate me.  From the first lecture in the first class, Dr. Stewart spoke to us like adults who needed their worldviews and assumptions and the way they looked at the world to be challenged.  Some were offended; some were bored; I was riveted. 

Although I was working full time, I spent two hours every night reading the assignments, then making and reviewing flashcards in preparation for the weekly quiz.

As the semester progressed, it became obvious to me that the subject, History of Western Civilization, was only an excuse to try to train students to think critically.  Based on conversations during the breaks, it was evident that while many could care less about his message, that I was not the only one inspired.

The "A" I earned in that course was more than an ego boost.  It was the start of a career that would result in my earning multiple degrees, achieve a small measure of success, and eventually author a book, "The STEM Student Survival Guide," with the goal of helping other students.

While I had other mentors along the way, Dr. Stewart ranks with the best of them.

Some years ago, I visited the college and was fortunate enough to spend a few minutes thanking the professor.

Because of those students he inspired, the world is a better place.

R.I.P. Dr. Stewart.

Leon Roomberg, MS, PMP, MDBA
12/28/2017
www.roomberg.com