ForeverMissed

This memorial website was created in memory of John Ehrman, 82, who was born on July 5, 1935 and passed away on February 20, 2018. He will be remembered fondly by many.

Posted by Tineke Graafland on October 19, 2020
Dearest John - or Sjonnie as I liked to call you (:-)
This has been the craziest year, and maybe just as well that you were spared to experience it: The pandemic early in the year; pretty much as of March 1 businesses, schools, churches, etc. closed due to the start of social distancing, and self isolation. Too much to mention, but it certainly affected my anxiety level. In August many fires erupted throughout the State. Big Basin National Park nearly destroyed, yet Henry Cowell State Park was spared. The San Mateo coastal fires merged wth the Santa Cruz ones. Bill and Erika Coulter's home, along with many others, burned to the ground. I do not know whether Bill lost any guitars. Vickee Flynn and Gary, the Le Counts, both living in La Honda, had to evacuate but did not lose their homes. Len Shustek's vacation home in Pescadero came close to be lost, but the winds shifted. Enormous fires, once again in Napa County. Destruction left and right. Then the Creek fire east of Fresno, which to this date is still not 100% contained, but created havoc. All these fires caused very bad air for us. So another reason to self isolate. I had no idea I could miss you more than I already did :-( I so wished to share all this with you personally...Everyone is wearing masks, strictly for the corona virus. "Safety protections are everywhere, as the social distance is still in effect, and will be a long time yet, due to no vaccines yet. I can go on and on, but such won't cure anything, ha....And now we are in the midst of the presidential election season. Prez Trump is saying the worst things possible. VP Biden, his opponent, is being much more civil. He has chosen Kamala Harris to be his running mate. The rise of the Neo Nazis is very frightening,
to say the least....
Finally the greatest sad news: Pastor Matthew has accepted the invitation from the CRC in Whitinsville, MA. Last Sunday was his last day of preaching (via podcast!). The family will fly; household and cars will go by moving truck. Yes! including your Element (:-)...
I hear next to nothing from your family, but that goes both ways I am afraid. You know, I have little intelligent things to say....Besides, for the longest time it has been really hot in Sacramento.
But then, the young people all work from home, the kids were off school, and being taught on line. Many schools are back in session but with incredible rules and regulations.
I do hear from the Hatches, on a regular basis; also from Shelley Bice, whose husband Stephen used to represent his company at SHARE. Oh, the name escapes me. We met them in Providence, RI
The Computer History Museum is still closed, which is truly sad.
Well, my lovely man, and partner in crime, send me strength and encouragement so that I can and will move forward. At least I still meet (via zoom) with my wonderful grief counselor. I have also joined a small group (also via zoom). I don't think I would want to do that in person) of folks who have lost a loved one, whether spouse or child.
This is a long epistle, but you know me: what one says in three words I say in ten...
Oh, Schola continues to look to the future; most likely virtual concerts, which is being done more and more. Musicians world wide have been hurt the most, if you ask me (but nobody cares wat I think, haha). Unless they teach as well, they get by.
Love of my life, you are here even though I do not see you. I shall always love you and know that you loved me....I promise to work on my anxiety!
Your ever loving wife!
Posted by Dee Hartzog on September 1, 2020
My brother, John, was two years older than me but always treated me with respect even though he was ten times smarter from the time he was little. And over the years he would continue to patiently answer questions and instruct me how to do certain things. I do miss him!
Posted by Larry England on August 31, 2020
John's name came up during a discussion about assembler and the book he authored on the same subject. John's memory lives on.
Posted by Tineke Graafland on August 30, 2020
Dearest John,

Since I wrote in July it has been a crazy time. The Corona Virus is still throwing its weight around. Each time we think the numbers of positive cases goes down, more are diagnosed. It is like a yo-yo. Face masks are still required, and so is social distancing (up to 6ft.) Essential stores have been open; slowly others are opening, but with the above mentioned requirements. I had my hair cut outside the salon, which was fun as Mai had put up a big mirror, which reflected the trees in the parking lot.

Then a few weeks ago we had a terrific dry lightning storm (roughly 20.000 strikes) over our area and the north bay, stretching over 4 hours, causing horrific fires: Our Bay area, East Bay, North Bay, Carmel Valley, and who knows where else. Thousands people evacuated, i.e. from La Honda, Scotts Valley North, the small towns within the redwoods such as Bonny Doon, Ben Lomond, Boulder Creek. But also in places like Vacaville, where the damage was incredibly bad. Bill Coulter (guitarist) and his wife Erika saw their house in Bonny Doon burn to the ground. The house was a rental, but pretty everything they owned is gone. I do not know about his guitars. Grant and family were prepared to leave at a moments notice,, however, are OK. UC Santa Cruz was very much treatened; everyone residing on campus was evacuated, yet the fire fighters did a tremendous job saving the university.
At first the number of firemen was very limited, but help came from other states. Needless to say, due to all the fires, no coastal fog and high temps, the air quality was practically through the roof. So a second reason to wear masks, although most masks are not against smokey air, but something is better than nothing. Oh yes, La Honda folks are fine, i.e. David and Arla Le Count.

I received a really nice note from Len Shustek in which he mentioned that your name had come up in an email discussion about fast IBM/360 assemblers, where Len brought up your SPASM project, which prompted Ron Mak, currently a professor at San Jose State, to write "I remember John from my student days as Stanford, 1971-1975. He (you) was great, one of the folks I looked up to at the computation center. I (Ron) took a short course on interfacing FORTRAN to 360 assembly language, and I (Ron) am sure it was taught by John. I still have manuals that he wrote"...as Len said "your impact is remembered by many!...I remember when we first started dating, there were times that someone would walk up (usually inside Tower Records!), name you by name and mention that he/she had taken your class at Stanford, which they enjoyed very much. You usually did not have a clue who they were, and I did not have a clue about the impact you had on folks. ha ha

Well my dearest, I can go on and on, but must save for the next epistle to you.
My love shall always be for you (can you imagine me being 80?haha)
Hugs, Tineke




Posted by Tineke Graafland on July 5, 2020
Dear Love of my Life: Happy 85th Birthday. 
Our "standard" John birthday celebration/bbq at Olthofs, on July 4th, sadly did not happen. As the O's recently moved to Ripon, Vremans invited me and the Brandses for a mini bbq, however, with the Covid* virus still runing rampart, Gary prefers to have as little contact with folks as possible, even though we were to be outside, and social distancing. So it was just the three of us, but ever so nice. You were definitely with us.
I have no plans for today, other than the church podcast (which I will listen to later on), and the congregants' "after service coffee hour" via zoom*
I miss you tremendously, especially during this time time of sheltering in place, and social distancing. If it were not for my incredibly kind and professional grief counselor I don't think I would be doing as well as I am.
You know I am forever grateful for God having placed you in my life, even though so often I did not show my love as well I should have.
You know I am not good at understanding that some day we will see each other again, so I do not have the peaceful acceptance our frinds have. Hopefully I will be like you: in your final hours stated that "it is all in God's shands".  All my love...Tineke
*Covid 19: a corona virus which has been a pandemic world wide since early this year. Too much to mention, but it has turned the world upside down. 
*Zoom: getting together via the computer, like video conferencing. It is amazing what all is being accomplishsed, especially in the music world.
Rest peacefully. 
Posted by Mary Artibee on July 5, 2020
Remembering your kindness and humor always... thanks, jre$sf...
Posted by Tineke Graafland on May 5, 2020
Hello dearest John,

Here we are: May 5, 2020; two years since your Memorial Service at Suynnyvale Presbyterian Church. Such a wonderful service. The sad part was that Pastor Matthew and I had not planned to immediately leave the sanctuary together to go directly to the reception area. 
consequently I was besieged by dear well wishes and actually did not make it to the reception. Luckily I was able to meet with most folks.
The turn out was amazing, but then you were loved and admired by all. I am still confused that you chose me as your partner, and eventually your wife.
My last entry mentioned the horrendous pandemic. Governor Newsom is starting to easy up on some restrictions. This has been a very difficult time for him. Folks are still being diagnosed; so far no one we know. The medical world is hit incredibly hard; they work amazing long hours, under dire circumstances.

I had mentioned the PACRC (for others: Palo Alto Christian Reformed Church) podcast services, which are going well. Don Sterk, my elder, has set up a zoom "after service coffee hour" with his constituants. Great fun. Charles Staats is in South Carolina with his mother, however, he joins us each Sunday.
so does Carolyn Lindemulder Koehn, from Las Vegas.
I do shop every now and then, but do wear a mask. I also have medical gloves; thanks to the Palo Alto Medical Clinic, when you were weakening and I tended to you. Oh do not worry, I had some left over; I am not using used ones :-)

Other than a few folks, I have lost touch with SHARE folks, especially Mike Stack, which is sad (his choice). Dan and Susan Greiner used to take me out for lunch, but during the Shelter in Place (SIP) order we have not seen each other.
I had a request from someone (via this site) asking whether your father's middle name was William. I will ask Dee as I do not remember.

Also due to the SIP, the Dutch Bunch ladies have not visited each other. Pietie suggested that on my birthday one couple will visit in the morning, the other in the afternoon, and the third in the evening: at a distance of the required 6ft (:-) Can you believe it? 80!! As the Dutch say "tachtig is prachtig"
translated: eighty is beautiful. No rhyming, however.

Well, my love of all loves, I shall close for now and let you rest in peace.
Posted by Sandra Hackman on April 30, 2020
My name is Sandie Hackman. I am so very sorry for you loss. I did not know John personally, but have researched whom I believe to be John's father, Robert William Ehrman, in hopes of finding Robert William's family. My father's cousin, Idris and Hiram Newbill, handed down to my father a copy of a typed manuscript of a book written by Robert William Ehrman, who was a friend and asked them to review it. I would like to return the manuscript to a member of his family if they are interested in having it. I have looked to see if it was published but found no record or perhaps it was published under another title than the one on the manuscript. You may email me at slhackman@me.com if you are interested in having it, I'm sorry to send this message on John's tribute page, but I have exhausted every means to find Robert's family and this was the only link I could find to contact you. 

Again, I am so very sorry for your loss. In reading about John's life, he was a truly extraordinary man.
Posted by Tineke Graafland on April 20, 2020
Well hello Dearest John,

I am sorry not to have written for a while. Not even on February 20th, but strangely enough it is May 5th, the day of your memorial service, which has a deeper impact on me. Whether putting words down or not, you are forever in my mind, and I talk with you every evening!

We are going through a strange time as we are experiencing a world wide pandemic, called the Corona-Virus COVID-19. We are ini our 5th or sixth week (am not sure)of sheltering in place. Only essential shops are open, we wear masks and medical type rubber gloves. Minimum distance between folks is 6ft. This "forced" isolation has really hit me hard; I miss you so much.
As Anneke Verweij said today, that if it wasn't for her dog she would go mad not being permitted to hug anyone, especially her four children. Studies have shown that the "non-touching" of skin is a depressant! Schools are closed, from preschool through Unversities. Most, if not all schools provide on-line classes. Churches are closed. Some have life stream "services"; PACRC offers services via podcast, complete with music and readers. Openng and closing music is provided by Barbara and Gretchen. Gretchen opted to be home with her parents while Magnus is with his father in far north Norway. Gretchen teaches her Norwegian students piano on line. Barbara says it is fun to witness such. No Schola rehearsals; maybe a zoom* meeting next week, to which Australian Margie has invited me.

I am doing OK. Can't say I eat the most healthy meals, but that is nothing new, ha. *There is a new communication system called Zoom. I have been able to attend a meeting or two, or just group visiting with church folks. Quite nice.

Matthew has been doing wonders with the church services. He requested a week off; yesterday Dan Hutt preached. It was so good to hear his voice. Jewel is still working in the Stanford Music Department; will hear mid June what may happen then. Tomorrow the Netherlands will learn whether their country lockdown will be lifted. Here many people have started protests as they want the shelter in place lifted. These are mostly folks who do not have jobs which they can do at home. The evangelicals are very much pushing this. But enough said.

I miss you, still expect you to walk through the door any minute. Love you more than I ever told you; luckily you knew (:-)

Your loving Spouse!!

By the way: according to IBM you earned $700.00 last year. You were sent an actual W-2 form!! Go figure. They even deducted Fed., State and Soc.Sec. taxes - haha.

(I did not edidt this!)
Posted by Dee Hartzog on February 20, 2020
I share Cassie's tributes. My brother, John, was always so tolerant of his "dumb" sister (me) and taught me so much. He constantly inspired me to continue to love classical music and he was the family genious. He will always be so missed!
Posted by Cassie Hartzog on February 20, 2020
Thinking about John today, and how much he meant to me and all those fortunate enough to know him. He was such a kind person, and generously shared his knowledge and passion for the things he loved. He made the world a better place. 
Posted by Larry England on February 20, 2020
I'm headed to SHARE next week where John made a significant impact and his memory will live on. He remains an inspiration to many (especially me).
Posted by Tineke Graafland on February 15, 2020
Dearest John,

Even though we were together for 35 years, today is our second wedding anniversary. Such a beautiful day, and although you were so sick, you were a super trooper. Sadly I had to lose you five days later, however, for you it was the best. As you kept telling me "it is all in God's hands"
Today I will have lunch with Anne Teng, at our favorite place Brian's, now The Bell Tower. This evening I go with the Sterks to Bing at Stanford to hear Mozart's Requiem plus one of the Brandenburgs. 
Every Monday evening I help with the Schola Rehearsal break refreshments. Always good to see some "old timers".
I miss you so incredibly much. Still go to counselling with a wonderful and sweet person. 
I love you to the moon and back and promise to write more.

Tineke
Posted by Gerry Van Mansum on August 13, 2018
I knew John as a fellow member at Palo Alto Christian Reformed Church while working for a start-up company in Sunnyvale, California from May 2011 to June 2013 and then from Nov. 2014 to Sept. 2015. He had a kind and selfless disposition and occasionally conducted the choir at PACRC. I did not know he was so intelligent and took credit for writing a high level assembler language. I can relate because writing an assembler for the IBM 370 mainframe was one of my projects during my fourth year of undergraduate studies in computer science at the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Canada in 1984. My sincere condolences to you Tineke. Your husband fought a courageous battle with cancer, lost the fight, but now is rejoicing with God's angels in heaven. Until we meet again!
Posted by Tineke Graafland on July 6, 2018
Congratulations dearest John,
I just received notice that yet another patent was approved in your name!
Although you are the most humble person, I do like to share this with all who read this.
My forever love! Tineke
Posted by Tineke Graafland on July 6, 2018
Dearest John,
Happy 83rd Birthday! A sad day to say the least :-( although yesterday was more difficult as on the fourth we, the Dutch Bunch, always celebrated YOU with a barbecue at the Olthofs.  Not this year, mainly due to several folks being sick....Instead the DB friends joined me this evening for toasting you and share memories. It was strange not having you in our midst.
Rest in peace my dearest friend and husband, or as your mother would refer to me as "my son's spose" meaning "suppose they'll ever get married?"
I have posted a picture of your special home memorial, complete with lighted candle. 
Forever loved by me!! Tineke
Posted by gina mastrantonio on July 1, 2018
My heart is heavy and filled with sadness for the loss of such a kind,
gentle, and courageous man. I worked with Tina many years ago at
SLAC and only recently met John at Palo Alto Medical Foundation, where he
had been a patient. I just learned of his passing one week ago from a
mutual friend. I am comforted that he had the best attention from his
loving and kind wife. They were a special couple. He will be missed by
everyone who knew him - what a sweet smile!
Posted by Tineke Graafland on June 9, 2018
Dearest John,
It has been nearly four months since your passing, yet it still feels as if you are "just on a one week SHARE trip". On May 5 we had the most beautiful memorial service, complete with all the J.S. Bach music you had chosen.
Rest in Peace most wonderful person, and sing with angels. They can always use a good DEEP bass voice :-). All my love, Tineke
In his prayer Pastor Dan Hutt said "May we have the courage, as John liked to quote, 'to comfort the afflicted, and to afflict the comfortable' "
Posted by Tony Piner on April 11, 2018
I knew John at the IBM Santa Teresa Lab from at least the 90's.
He had a calm, quiet, confident - and above all - correct authority which surpassed the noisy climbers in every way.
He is among the most respected people that I have known, and I am better for knowing him.
John - from now on, may all your return codes be zero.
Posted by Dick Johnson on April 7, 2018
My wife Anna and I ran into John and Tineke in Carmel last July while they were attending the Bach Festival. I worked with John at SLAC for many years before he moved to IBM. Those were fun times. I also ran into him frequently when I moved to IBM myself and at countless SHARE meetings. Anna and I even cataloged his contribution of Assembler language memorabilia to the Computer History Museum!

Good bye John, it was good knowing you!
Posted by Tineke Graafland on April 6, 2018
Memorial/Celebration of Life:

When:  Saturday, May 5, at 10:00am
Where: Sunnyvale Presbyterian Church, Fremont Avenue, Sunnyvale.
Music:  Mostly J.S. Bach, as chosen by John.

All are welcome!
Posted by Tineke Graafland on April 6, 2018
John has been gone about six weeks. Exactly one month from today, April 5, will be John's Memorial/Celebration of Life. I so look forward to the J.S. Bach music which John selected; the words spoken by his nephew and friends John selected. John deserves nothing but the best, knowing how humble he was and hated it when folks placed him on a pedestal...I so miss his quiet demeanor, his loving kindness, and patience. May he rest in peace. As it states in one or our church hymns "EARTH HAS NO SORROW THAT HEAVEN CANNOT HEAL". Rest in peace dearest John. Your loving wife, Tineke
Posted by Ira Sheftman on April 5, 2018
I met John somewhere back in the late 80s when I was working in Fortran at what was then the IBM Santa Teresa Lab (now Silicon Valley Lab). I could see right off how sharp John was technically but what struck me was how approachable and personable he was. Very easy to talk to and always willing to share his knowledge.
I think my fondest memory of John happened in a large meeting with many managers and technical folks. The topic was how we approached customers. John got up, put his hands over his eyes and rolled his head around, saying that all too often IBMers would go to customers and act like they had blinders on. I nearly fell out of my chair. A lively discussion followed. All initiated by John's wonderful wit and humor. He will be greatly missed.
Posted by Andi Jackson on March 28, 2018
During my considerable years at STL working on various compilers, John always seemed to have an office nearby. He was always available to answer a question, offer an explaination (he just loved slipping into “teacher mode”) or help solve a problem. Many a project were completed because of his willingness to put his own work aside so that we could take advantage of his HLASM expertise. John was the perfect teacher, mentor, leader.....calm, knowledgeable, easy going and could explain the most complex idea in terms that the rest of us could understand. He had a wonderful career at IBM and I am thankful that I had an opportunity to work with him.
Posted by John Melcher, Jr. on March 28, 2018
John and I put together the "Assembler Indignaiton" project at GUIDE user group. The GUIDE management thought there was no interest. John and I proved otherwise. If I suggested a topic for "next meeting" John could always come through. I enjoyed working with him at GUIDE and SHARE. John's good humor and skilled teaching will be missed.
Posted by Nancy Wheeler on March 21, 2018
I came to know John at SHARE when I was assigned to be the IBM representative for the APL project in the late 1980's.  He was a mentor to me there, and through the years was always available to help with the tricky stuff like machine architecture and most recently, helping me understand complex numbers.  About a year ago he took a group of us on a tour of the Computer History Museum which was completely fascinating. I will miss his kindness, keen intelligence and dry sense of humor.
Posted by James Dargin on March 20, 2018
RIP John.

I met John when he was assigned to the IBM repository
project as the Languages/Assembler representative.

He was always so positive even though skeptical -- fun to be around.
In later years he was a regular at the SVL cafe at a table where deep conversations could be joined.

He will be missed.
Posted by joan alter on March 20, 2018
I have fond memories of John from SLAC in the late 60s. I learned assembler from an early draft of his textbook, printed on computer paper. He was a wonderful mentor and extremely witty.
Posted by Ted Syrett on March 19, 2018
I was a colleague of John's at SLAC in the early 1970s. We shared a fondness for IBM 360/370 assembly-language programming and a love/hate relationship with IBM. I lost touch with John when i moved to a small start-up company in San Francisco, but found him again when, back in Silicon Valley, I began participating in Schola Cantorum's Messiah Sings. Lo and behold, there was John, helping me track Handel's bass parts! Thanks for showing me the way, John. Like you, I'll go on singing as long as I am able.
Posted by Susan Enger on March 5, 2018
I suspect I first met John in 1990 which was my first year doing the Carmel Bach Festival. Being new and not knowing anyone, I remember feeling rather lonely. After a tower music program, John singled me out and started a conversation including questions about instruments and music. He was also very complimentary of my playing which of course I appreciated.
One year John and Tineke invited me to lunch with them at the Little Swiss Cafe, which became an annual ritual. We’d have a lively conversation, including festival gossip, and examine the ever changing artwork in the cafe.
John and I corresponded once or twice a year. Even after I left the festival after 20 years, he didn’t forget me and continued to write, never mentioning his illness.
He was a kind man, thoughtful and ever curious. I will always remember him with love.
Posted by Colette, Michael, and Chl... on March 3, 2018
We will always remember John for his kindness, his passion for life, and his eternally boyish smile. He enriched our lives with his deep knowledge on a wide variety of topics and his desire to share the activities he loved. He shared that knowledge and those activities freely with enthusiasm. His passion was infectious and it added to the enjoyment of spending time with him at meals or concerts or lectures. John always had some little known fact to add that made you feel like were in on a secret. He approached life with such joy; he knew what he wanted to do and nothing would stop him. He relished bringing people together and everyone was treated like family. John added to the texture of our lives and will long be remembered with love and respect.
Posted by Dee Hartzog on March 3, 2018
John, my brother, was 2 years older but many years smarter and always tolerant and helpful. He helped me struggle through understanding physics in high school and introduced me to the Bach Festival in Carmel and the Messiah Sing Along, as well as the Schola Cantorum. He was so special and will be missed forever.
Posted by Larry England on March 2, 2018
I worked with "Dr John" at IBM at the STL facility for many years. I watched John and viewed him as my role model - extremely smart, innovative (before the term was in vogue), always calm and well-mannered in all situations, and above all willing to help. He had the 'professor' in him that made him a natural teacher and took the time to explain things. He loved talking about technical things (assembler!), but he also took the time to explain things to me about the business side of IBM. I learned so much from John that it is truly hard to quantify. I will always remember him and speak of him fondly.
Posted by Arla LeCount on March 2, 2018
I worked with John in the 1980’s at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. John was always such a calm, solid presence. In addition to knowing his stuff technically, he just knew what he was about. Layered on top of this competent, confident man was the most delicious wry sense of humor. He was always good for a lively conversation and a good laugh. He made the world a better place and will be sorely missed.
Posted by Cassie Hartzog on March 2, 2018
I credit my Uncle John with getting me interested in computers, from the tours at SLAC and the ascii art he printed for me there, to the computer games he let me play on his home terminal, to helping him assemble a computer terminal from a Radio Shack kit, and teaching me the basics of programming. Later, he arranged an internship for me at IBM. I enjoyed sharing his delight in computers at the Computer History Museum. I am proud that some of the handheld devices I worked on are in the museum, alongside the mainframes he cut his teeth on. In this, and in many other ways, he enriched my life, which is the poorer for his passing.
Posted by Susan Rosen on March 2, 2018
We met our dear friend, Tineke, in 1969. It was much later when we met John on several trips to California. Living in Western NY, we didn't get to that part of the country often, but it was a delight to spend time with the two of them when we had the chance. It was easy to feel the love they shared for each other and complemented each other. As Tineke would update us on John's medical issues, we can agree with the friend, Ed, who labeled him the "energizer bunny." Now he is resting in peace. It's sad to know we won't get a chance to see him again but blessed to have crossed his path.
Posted by Ed Oddo on February 28, 2018
I worked with John for many, many years at IBM. I remember the "Dr. John" posters scattered around the SVL (aka STL) lab years ago. The expression on John's face in the picture on this site captures his essence. I never knew him to complain and his demeaoner was always the same, calm, cool and collected and his wry sense of humor ever present. He seemed to have more than his share of physical challenges over the past decade or so and I came to liken him to the energizer bunny --- takes a licking but keeps on ticking. He will be missed and remembered for sure.
Posted by Tineke Graafland on February 27, 2018
It is with great sadness that my husband John Robert Ehrman passed away just two weeks after having been told that the bladder/prostate cancer had practically exploded to liver and kidneys. Three months was the word, however, John was relieved of his shut down body just two weeks later. His mind, however, was just as sharp as ever.
I shall forever love and miss him.
Posted by James Francis Cray on February 27, 2018
I could always ask john a question about HLASM via e-mail and his first response was,,, Read the Documentation and reread it again,,, then he would always include the solution i was seeking... It always seemed that he knew that I was using it for z390.org
Posted by Don Higgins on February 27, 2018
I will always remember John Ehrman as the father of IBM High Level Assembler. We met many times at SHARE where he managed the Assembler Project. He was passionate about everyone learning assembler and enjoyed teaching classes.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Tineke Graafland on October 19, 2020
Dearest John - or Sjonnie as I liked to call you (:-)
This has been the craziest year, and maybe just as well that you were spared to experience it: The pandemic early in the year; pretty much as of March 1 businesses, schools, churches, etc. closed due to the start of social distancing, and self isolation. Too much to mention, but it certainly affected my anxiety level. In August many fires erupted throughout the State. Big Basin National Park nearly destroyed, yet Henry Cowell State Park was spared. The San Mateo coastal fires merged wth the Santa Cruz ones. Bill and Erika Coulter's home, along with many others, burned to the ground. I do not know whether Bill lost any guitars. Vickee Flynn and Gary, the Le Counts, both living in La Honda, had to evacuate but did not lose their homes. Len Shustek's vacation home in Pescadero came close to be lost, but the winds shifted. Enormous fires, once again in Napa County. Destruction left and right. Then the Creek fire east of Fresno, which to this date is still not 100% contained, but created havoc. All these fires caused very bad air for us. So another reason to self isolate. I had no idea I could miss you more than I already did :-( I so wished to share all this with you personally...Everyone is wearing masks, strictly for the corona virus. "Safety protections are everywhere, as the social distance is still in effect, and will be a long time yet, due to no vaccines yet. I can go on and on, but such won't cure anything, ha....And now we are in the midst of the presidential election season. Prez Trump is saying the worst things possible. VP Biden, his opponent, is being much more civil. He has chosen Kamala Harris to be his running mate. The rise of the Neo Nazis is very frightening,
to say the least....
Finally the greatest sad news: Pastor Matthew has accepted the invitation from the CRC in Whitinsville, MA. Last Sunday was his last day of preaching (via podcast!). The family will fly; household and cars will go by moving truck. Yes! including your Element (:-)...
I hear next to nothing from your family, but that goes both ways I am afraid. You know, I have little intelligent things to say....Besides, for the longest time it has been really hot in Sacramento.
But then, the young people all work from home, the kids were off school, and being taught on line. Many schools are back in session but with incredible rules and regulations.
I do hear from the Hatches, on a regular basis; also from Shelley Bice, whose husband Stephen used to represent his company at SHARE. Oh, the name escapes me. We met them in Providence, RI
The Computer History Museum is still closed, which is truly sad.
Well, my lovely man, and partner in crime, send me strength and encouragement so that I can and will move forward. At least I still meet (via zoom) with my wonderful grief counselor. I have also joined a small group (also via zoom). I don't think I would want to do that in person) of folks who have lost a loved one, whether spouse or child.
This is a long epistle, but you know me: what one says in three words I say in ten...
Oh, Schola continues to look to the future; most likely virtual concerts, which is being done more and more. Musicians world wide have been hurt the most, if you ask me (but nobody cares wat I think, haha). Unless they teach as well, they get by.
Love of my life, you are here even though I do not see you. I shall always love you and know that you loved me....I promise to work on my anxiety!
Your ever loving wife!
Posted by Dee Hartzog on September 1, 2020
My brother, John, was two years older than me but always treated me with respect even though he was ten times smarter from the time he was little. And over the years he would continue to patiently answer questions and instruct me how to do certain things. I do miss him!
Posted by Larry England on August 31, 2020
John's name came up during a discussion about assembler and the book he authored on the same subject. John's memory lives on.
Recent stories

Stopping by to say hello (:-)

Shared by Tineke Graafland on November 19, 2019
Dearest John,

It has been far too long that I wrote you a note.  This of course does not mean that I have forgotten you, as that is simply impossible.  Luckily you know me well enough to realize that I kept putting it off, being the forgetful person I am.  But enough about that.

I still go to counseling, one on one, once a week with an incredibly kind and understanding "youngish" woman I met through Pathways, andis now with Kara in Palo Alto.  

Almost every Monday evening I attend the Schola rehearsal for just a little while.  I help with the refreshments, visit with folks, stay for an adidtional half hour to listen.  Carol Worthington-Levy and I sponsor the Christmas concert!  The fall concert was Duke Ellington gospel music, with a complete jazz band.  It was really nice.  You would have loved it.  So far I am not too enthused about the Christmas concert; as always it has to grow on me, ahem.

Schola "lost" about 18 members, but they gained 14 new ones.  No re-auditioning was required.  Such will be next year.  I really like the new conductor.

The Sterks have once again invited me for Thanksgiving dinner.  Valerie's parents will be here again, as the SVPC Christmas concert is December 8.

I miss you tremendously; still have moments that I think you are coming home.  Often I can't wait to come home and share something I have noticed on the way, or tell you something interesting I was told.

I love you and always will.  
As I said before "I love to Heaven and Back"

Tinekexoxoxx



 

One Year Death Anniversary

Shared by Tineke Graafland on February 26, 2019

Dearest John,

A year has passed since God called you home on February 20, 2018.

Anne Verweij was here for the week and helped me get through it.  In the morning Pat and Pietie came for coffee.  Early afternoon Anne and I drove to Milbrae to take BART to SF in order to meet her cousin Jitske, second daughter of Jeanette Boonstra, who is a co-pilot for British Air and in town for a day.  We got off at the Montgomery station, where Jitske waited for us in a bright red coat, so we could not miss her :-).  The weather was sunny but quite breezy and cold.  We walked to the Ferry Building, which I had not seen inside.  From there we walked to the Pier 23 Cafe and had a wonderful fish and chips "dunch".  Then on to Pier 39, which is not nearly as fun as before as high end shops are coming in.  At least the seals were presen, haha.  The gals then introduced me to Uber, which we took to the Castro, where we had drinks in a delightful corner bar.  Uber back to the Park Hotel where Jitske was staying, one block from the Montgomery station, where we took BART back to Millbrae.  Earlier when I parked the car a gent walked up to his car next to mine and gave me his paid parking ticket. Not too shabby, huh?!  The gals kept me busy so that I was able to take my mind off the day.

There is so much I wish I had been able to share with you before you died. Even apologized for, but you went so quickly.  Know that I love(d) you with all my heart and being.  You are definitely one in a million.

Rest peacefully my Dearest...All my love, TinekeG :-) 

Oh yes: unbelievable the destruction on the Capitola beach, and the Carmel beach from an earlier storm. The latter doesn't even look the same.


Our Wedding Anniversary

Shared by Tineke Graafland on February 15, 2019

Hello dearest husband of mine (:-)

You have not heard me for some time (at least on this tribute) but as today is the first anniversary of our wedding I want to reiterate how much I love you and what you meant to me over the many years we were together.....Joan Sakaldasis is taking me to lunch, and this evening I go with the Sterks to Stanford to listen to Durufle's Requiem.

You may like to know that I bit the bullet and ordered tickets for the Carmel Bach Festival, and made reservations at the Lobos, but NOT our room of many years.

 Next week already one year since God called you home. Oh, how I miss you :-(

Rest in Peace!!....Tineke

PS: I forgot to say that yet another patent (group) was approved (:-)