ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, John Adams, 99 years old, born on October 13, 1921, and passed away on February 6, 2021. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Tim Brewer on February 17, 2021
I had the privilege of knowing John and Jean by attending KCC. John was always a caring individual. He demonstrated that in his open love for Jean. My wife and I on occasion shared lunch with them and other couples after church. Once when visiting John at his home, he proudly showed me his garage workshop. John was proud of his creations. That day he gave me a wooden plate that I still have as part of a kitchen table decoration. Yes, I was one of those 200 plus people he blessed with a home made wooden plate! I will miss his firm handshake and gentle spirit!
Posted by Paul Loeffler on February 8, 2021
Beautiful tribute, wonderful photos, and the perfect musical selection for his life & legacy.
Posted by Susan Kampsen on February 8, 2021
Blessings to the whole Adams Family, Grandpa John was such a kind and talented man. Our prayers go out to you all as you honor and remember him. Susan & Steve Kampsen (Holly Adams Kampsens in-laws)
Posted by Glenda Pondoc on February 7, 2021
To Adams Family: 

It was truly an honor to take care of John even for a short period of time. My staff and I are forever grateful for the opportunity to be of service to him. 

Love & Prayers
Posted by Bruce Adams on February 7, 2021
Plans for a memorial are still in progress.

Thank you for visiting this site we've put together to honor the memory and life of our Dad, John Adams. He was to the family the way he was to everyone, deeply caring, warm, personable, and someone who listened intently when others shared with him. We'd love for you to share your stories about John. Just click on the "Stories" tab and begin typing your memory. Thank you so much.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Tim Brewer on February 17, 2021
I had the privilege of knowing John and Jean by attending KCC. John was always a caring individual. He demonstrated that in his open love for Jean. My wife and I on occasion shared lunch with them and other couples after church. Once when visiting John at his home, he proudly showed me his garage workshop. John was proud of his creations. That day he gave me a wooden plate that I still have as part of a kitchen table decoration. Yes, I was one of those 200 plus people he blessed with a home made wooden plate! I will miss his firm handshake and gentle spirit!
Posted by Paul Loeffler on February 8, 2021
Beautiful tribute, wonderful photos, and the perfect musical selection for his life & legacy.
Posted by Susan Kampsen on February 8, 2021
Blessings to the whole Adams Family, Grandpa John was such a kind and talented man. Our prayers go out to you all as you honor and remember him. Susan & Steve Kampsen (Holly Adams Kampsens in-laws)
his Life
John was born in Lindsay CA on October 13, 1921, to Hawley and Leona Adams. He was the 4th of 6 children, one of which did not survive infancy. He graduated from Lindsay High School in 1940, then went on to COS in Visalia.  He drove a bus for COS and picked up students in Strathmore and Lindsay, where he met our mom, Marjorie. At COS he enrolled in the Civilian Pilot Training program, designed to usher pilots into the US military just prior to WWII. When the war broke out John joined the navy and flew multi-engine transports around the southwest and the Pacific theater. He and mom were married in December of '43 while he was stationed in Indiana.  After the war, the family began to grow and they lived in Strathmore for two years while he worked in his father-in-law's business, Strathmore Machine Works. They moved to Kingsburg in 1950 with four kids and Dad worked for Drake Steel in Fresno as an area salesman.  After five years he began another career of selling mutual funds. Always the inventive type, he invented a circular pipe cutter in the 60s. In 1971 he invented an anchor bolt holder for the construction industry and over the next 40 years sold about a million of them. In 1980 he invented the Handle Saver, which saved axe handles and other tool handles from breaking. All of the kids and grandkids had experiences helping him lable and ship those items which made for good family memories. Somewhere around a million Handle Savers were also sold.  He also had other inventions, the Unreel, a hose holder, and a few other minor items.  
Marjorie died in 1994, and in 1996 John married another Lindsay schoolmate, Patty Honey.
They were married for seven years before she died suddenly in January, 2004.  In October of 2004 he married another Lindsay schoolmate, and his sister-in-law's sister, Jean Asher of Dinuba.  They were married for 14 years before her death in 2018.
In 2006 our brother Gary died of brain cancer, a tragic day for us all.
One of John's retirement activities was wanting to thank people who had been in his life. He began making wooden plates on a lathe out of zebra wood, with a brass inscription on the back.  Over the next several years he made and gave away over 200 beautiful wooden plates. By his early nineties he quit making plates, saying "I can't think of anyone else to give one to, and its too hard to think about."
His last wish for his life was that he would not live to see his 100th birthday. He got his wish after 99 years and 4 months. We are so grateful for the simple and painless way he passed.
As family members we are forever grateful for his kindness and love.  We realize he was a very unique and special man. Our hope is that we can live up to a little bit of the example he set for us.


John Adams WWII Days
Memoirs of WWII, by John Adams 
As told to Bruce Adams (fall & winter, 2016-17)
Link Here
Recent stories

A Father's Grace

Shared by Bruce Adams on February 9, 2021
I would like to relate an experience I had with my Dad when I was about five years old. This would have been about 1954. Dad loved tools, but his tool budget was very limited. When he bought a new one, it was kind of a big deal, and we four boys were always excited when a new tool came home. On this particular occasion, he brought a new tape measure home from Citizens’ Lumber in Kingsburg, CA. Dad was pretty proud of it. Gary was the oldest boy so he had the first kid's right to play with it. I didn’t really see much of it the rest of the day but I filed in my mind that in the morning I would play with it. The next morning, I found the tape in Dad’s tool bench and began pulling the tape in and out. I pulled the tape out a foot or so. I thought it was so cool. Then, for whatever reason, I folded the metal tape in half and creased it. Then I folded it back the other way and creased it again. Then I did it again, and to my horror, the tape broke completely in half and zipped inside the housing leaving me holding a one-foot piece of tape in one hand and the housing in the other hand. I was devastated and knew right away I had done something terrible. I sadly walked into the house and showed mom what I had done and made up some lame story about how it happened. She responded, “When your Dad gets home, tell him the truth and show him the tape.” That was a scary thought.“Will he spank me?” I asked.“I don’t know,” she replied, “But it will be best if you tell him the truth.”
Oh wow, I was really caught. There was no way out of this. I really had to face it. My mom knew the basic facts and now there was no hiding it. I waited impatiently all day. The minutes dragged by. Facing Dad with the story was the only thing on my mind the entire day. The minutes kept dragging on and on. The last hour or so I sat by the window watching for his car to pull into the driveway. At long last, the car showed up and pulled into the driveway. I went outside with the tape. He got out of the car and I meekly showed him the tape and explained exactly what I did. His expression never changed to any kind of anger or show of being upset. I get a little misty-eyed when I think about this part, and I’ve thought about it more than a few times. He squatted down to get face to face with me, put his arm around me, and said, “You told the truth, and that is really important. It’s more important than what happened to the tape measure. Don’t worry about the tape, I’m just proud of you for telling the truth.” And that was it. I was overwhelmed.It wasn’t the reaction I expected at all. Something happened with my relationship to my Dad that day that I can’t fully explain.Perhaps it was something about deeper loyalty. He gave up his cherished tape measure to teach his son the importance of telling the truth and he did so in a very caring way. My loyalty to him was never in question after that incident. Furthermore, I don’t remember ever again questioning my Dad’s love for me.I knew I was secure in it.When my junior high years came along, my friends complained frequently about their dads.I never told anyone the story of the tape measure, but secretly I had no reason to complain about my Dad. He was very special to me because I knew I was much more important to him than a shiny new tape measure.

Shared by Janet Beatty on February 8, 2021
John was such a delight to know. My late husband, Ted, and I met John in the early 1990's when we were working on a product. John offered much needed information on how to accomplish our goal. He and Ted, being the inventers they were, enjoyed exchanging ideas. We enjoyed many meals together over the years. My prayer for the family that you have peace knowing you dad is now in heaven enjoying all those who went before him.

Peace to each of you.