ForeverMissed
You left us in person, but your spirit will not be resting in peace; it will be goading us on from afar. Any of us who ever experienced your tireless innovating and theorizing, your persistent engagement, and your passionate drive to make the world a better place will meet your memory around many a curve of our forward road. Let’s raise a craft brew high in a place where live-and-local fills the air: to the long, long legacy of John’s wit, writ, wisdom and truly remarkable mental wonderlust!
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM NANCY STEVENS, a senior faculty member at Ohio University who had engaged with John in the development of her Museum Complex, as well as other new ideas.

****
John was special in his uncanny ability to at once be firmly present in the conversation, and somehow light-years ahead in terms of where that conversation would ultimately be going. Focused on what really matters, he worked with ideas as though they were clay…patiently shaping, adding substance, removing unnecessary bits, and evoking purpose and meaning. His warmth and crackling energy filled the room, creating good and making space for new ideas.

****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM FRITHJOF BERGMANN, an emeritus professor of philosophy at the University of Michigan, the thesis advisor and longtime friend and collaborator of John’s. John was a key editor for Dr. Bergmann’s “Being Free,” and a supporter and advisor in later years of his ongoing “New Work, New Culture” movement.
****
I loved John, seriously and intensely, and I admired him and respected him, during the many, many years of our close and heartfelt friendship. I very often came to John with some question or request, and in all the years of our friendship, (and I knew him when he was an undergrad at Michigan,) he never—not once—did not meet my request with an immediate, superbly intelligent response. The times when he contributed importantly to the work we did together are countless. Among the many things I particularly admired about him was that he, in every case, instantaneously wrote something that moved forward whatever we were doing together, and he always did it instantly, with grace and good humor, and with more wisdom than I had in me. He was a superb teacher, which came especially to the fore, when he guided a chain of bookstores, The Little Professor Book Store, and also the entrepreneurial work he did in Ohio. At moments like this, it is customary to speak of one’s loss, but in the case of John, this is poignantly true; I don’t remember a single conversation we had in the forty years we knew each other, in which I did
not gain from him, so the loss I feel, now that he is gone is not a mere phrase; I will miss him acutely and fearfully, and I will feel deprived now that he is gone.
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM STEPHANIE HOWE, Voinovich School colleague
****
Whenever I think of John, I think of his warm smile and his kind eyes--eyes that twinkle with mischief, with happiness, or with deep, deep thoughts depending on the occasion. When I watch John in meetings, I can truly almost see the gears turning in his brilliant mind as he jots notes in one of his omnipresent Composition books (oh what I would give to get my hands on one his Composition books ). John’s introspective demeanor is powerful in its simplicity and his modesty belies the dazzling depth of his intelligence and capacity to create and apply knowledge in inimitable and impactful ways.

I remember John showing a group of us how well he was doing after his hip surgery by dancing light on his feet and what a joy it was to see him feel so happy and free! My favorite times to see John is when he is with Faith. The two of them positively glow in one another’s company and clearly demonstrate the beauty of love founded in profound respect, mutual admiration, and boundless adoration of one another.

John has been a gift to everyone who has had the great fortune to work with him and know him. I count myself blessed to be a friend and colleague of John and Faith!

Much love always….Stephanie
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM JON SOWASH, friend, local attorney and colleague, regarding the Honeybees 'at-home concert' for John during the pandemic
****
-being with John and you
-seeing John and you dance; John flinging his oxygen line dramatically behind him (remembering you dancing at Jerry and Robin’s election party)
-seeing you children; taking a while to realize that was Lark or Larke; hearing them explain how your woods connected to their grandma’s woods and their dad’s
-seeing your amazing home, and that ceiling inside, and floor, and the wood working and entrance door, barn track doors, the setting, the roof, the porch extension out the side – could go on and on
-of course being at live music which I have missed very much – realized what a big part of my life it is; my ecstatic go to more than I knew, with it gone these last six months
--seeing Emily in action – she became one of Sandy’s star therapists before Sandy retired last year; a natural; started playing music with her with Dogtown forever ago
--seeing David (Honeybee guitarist) who I met and jammed with last year, thinking about putting another band together, with Jerry and the Dogtown Erlewine bros last year. 
--your woods and that deep, deep ravine
--listening to John talk about his course and how it overlaps with his Sugar Bush board teaching
--seeing both of you happy
--seeing Meghan with her perpetual slight smile and hearing that she loves the new job
--seeing Michelle, who along with Carol Kuhre, were the first two people I met from Athens just before I moved here – both at a conference at Grailville I attended; both of whom I have done a million things with since. 
--seeing John and Suzanne – they are both so handsome and cool
--hearing the Honeybees’ new keyboard player and sax and drummer – always liked that drummer when he was in Carrow’s band with Jeff Redefer – a great drummer is rare. 
--watching Mr. Shagbark in action – I used to presume his uniqueness was an act, but he is truly a one off. 
--watching Bruce Voss sort of dance – would have never guessed he had it in him. 
--seeing Mark Burhans and thinking about all of the positive energy one couple can bring to a community when thinking about he and Hilarie and John and you. 

Honored to be invited and there – Jon
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM MARCIA GOLDSTEIN AND DAVID HEROLD, family friends and parents of a close friend of Faith's children
****
David and I enjoyed reminiscing of the many times we ran into John (and often you also) at area festivals. Here are two encounters we recall fondly.

Having run into John numerous times at area festivals and other venues, we remember him as having a hearty appreciation of both people and craft beer. Once during Brew Week we chanced to meet him and at least part of the conversation touched upon the Brew Week organization. We learned that John was serving the organization and he spoke of the effort involved in hosting an event for out of town revelers. Upon parting ways, John kindly gifted us a handful of wooden beer tokens.

On another encounter, I was imposed upon to drop Lily off during a driving rain to a preplanned cross country group run which was to embark at Little Fish. Since I was skeptical that anyone else would actually show in such weather, I accompanied Lily into Little Fish to verify that no one else would really be there. There were a handful of people inside, including one of Lily’s running buddies. I was ready to resign myself to a lonely wait while Lily and Reba went running when John waved from a table and offered me a pint of my choice. John welcomed me to the table and I passed the time drinking beer and discussing a glow light invention about which John was providing some guidance.

These encounters and many similar others encapsulate for us John’s nature as one who serves the community, as one who is welcoming and as one who enjoys craft beer.

Warmly,
David and Marcia
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM LAURA MILAZZO, Voinovich School collegue
****
When I think of John, I think of someone who has a passionate heart, dogged persistence, love for the arts, and drive for including everyone.

Passionate Heart: What a delight to work in the same organization as someone who biked to work. When I worked in Bldg. 19, I loved seeing his bike in his office. He always inspired me to find a reason to take a few extra steps and to be active. We sit for so many meetings and work activities, I appreciate that he is a refreshing beacon of seeking wellness.

Dogged Persistence: We only worked directly together on one project: the Hocking Athens Perry Community Action’s planning initiative. What impressed me the most throughout our meetings with them is how patient and dogged John was about listening and hearing their various perspectives of all the key stakeholders. He constantly inquired and repeated back what he thought he had heard to ensure we had clarity. Equally impressive, he would leverage valuable tools from the business community to move the organization and professionals toward industry best practices, even if it meant in this case a change in key leadership. Learned many valuable professional lessons from this short duration project.

Love of Arts and Inclusivity: I feel fortunate that our paths also crossed for a short while both professionally at the Voinovich School and personally at West Elementary. Once I realized that you had connections with West, a school that emphasized the arts and economic inclusion, I felt grateful to work in the same organization with someone who held similar interests. Our family still has many happy memories from West. And what other school could out motto ours: West is Best!

Much love and appreciation for the opportunity to work with John!

All the best, Laura Milazzo
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM LUCILLE ECKRICH, Alliance for Just Money
****
I awoke this morning, as I often do, with some detail of Alliance work trying to untangle its way through my mind. As I came more to and the day and days ahead came to mind, the line from one of my favorite singer's songs came: "Who knows where the time goes, who knows where the time goes?"

As I took myself downstairs to play the song, you and my dying sister-in-law came to mind. Listening to the song in the wee hours of the morning, the meanings embedded in its words touched more soulfully than ever.

I wish you both this day, and in the days that come, the gift of time and the gifts that time brings, leaves with us, and takes us with all in creation's embrace.

With love and deep respect and appreciation,
~~Lucille

Who Knows Where the Time Goes
by Sandy Denny, sung by Judy Collins


Across the morning sky,
All the birds are leaving,
Ah, how can they know it's time for them to go?
Before the winter fire,
We'll still be dreaming.
I do not count the time

Who knows where the time goes?
Who knows where the time goes?

Sad deserted shore,
Your fickle friends are leaving,
Ah, but then you know it's time for them to go,
But I will still be here,
I have no thought of leaving.
I do not count the time

Who knows where the time goes?
Who knows where the time goes?

And I'm not alone,
While my love is near me,
And I know, it will be so, till it's time to go,
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM STEVE MOYER, former Little Professor employee, early in John's illness
****
Hi John,

I know, long time no see/speak to/write to, etc, etc. The last time we were in touch was when you had just started your job at OH state U. Much too long a time period for sure. This doesn't mean I haven't thought about you often over the years! 

I spoke to O'Leary a few days ago and he told me of your dire health situation. Hope you don't mind Mike telling me the sad news about you and your health? I was devastated John! You are much too young to have cancer. I know, it can happen to anyone, but not someone I know and admire!! 

I guess the real reason I wanted to write to you was to say how much you enhanced my life starting with the day I met you. My years at LP were some of the best of my career and some of the most educational. I'm retired now and still married to Yvonne who just retired 2 months ago. We both are so sad for you and as I said, I wanted to let you know how much you meant to me. You are one of the good guys John, I hope you know this.

Should you need anything please don't hesitate to ask John. Ohio is just across the border you know!! You will be in my thoughts and prayers John and I will think positive thoughts for you and your family.

Steve Moyer
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM CAROL PATTERSON, fellow OVST Board member, early in John's illness
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I want you to know what knowing you has meant to me. First, without Faith, our paths probably would not have passed. That would be a great loss for me, so thank you Faith for having the good sense to love John.

Among my adjectives for you John are kind, brilliant, generous to a fault. I have rarely seen you without a big smile. You are a caring community member and have generously contributed to many causes, helping local businesses get started, helping political candidates, helping not for profit entities. I am well aware that some of these efforts stemmed from your roles with the Voinovich School and TechGROWTH but your passion for the people and their goals was always apparent.

No, I have not forgotten that you are a bartender beyond reproach. Anyway, thank you for your friendship and smiles. I would come over and sing, but that would NOT be therapeutic. Keep finding the laughter!!
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM GINA JOHNTONY, Voinovich School colleague
****
I did want to share a memory. I always enjoyed seeing Faith and John on the dance floor in a different light than a business relationship. It seemed they were at many Wild Honey Bees performances, which always requires dancing. It always brought a smile to my face to see them laughing and dancing with such freedom. Watching people dance always shows a different side of a person. It was great to see them both dancing on the wild side like they were the only two on the dance floor.
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM LEE GROESCHLE, former employee of John's at TechGROWTH.

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I had the pleasure of serving as an Executive-in-Residence (EIR) with TechGROWTH Ohio from 2015-2017. John Glazer was one of several executives that hired me and gave me an opportunity to serve for TechGROWTH Ohio at Ohio University.

The first thing that was very apparent about John was his passion for mentoring, coaching and being a man of "entrepreneurial action". Coming from an entrepreneurial background myself, I found John to be a wonderful colleague and an even better person. John's energy and enthusiasm, along with his quick wit, gave energy to anyone who he interacted with. 

Ohio University and SE Ohio will greatly miss the leadership John provided. Everyone who knew John would say that he was a man of great character and integrity. He will be greatly missed and held in the highest of regards.
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM ROCHELLE REMY, a graduate student in Ohio University’s inaugural Social Enterprise class, for which John developed the curriculum, pre-recorded the key lecture series, and co-taught the classes in his last months.

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I would love to submit the attached memory of John Glazer for the public memory sharing website. In a lot of ways, he reminded me of my dad who passed away ten years ago - a wise, kind man with an incredible amount of knowledge to share and not in an intimidating way. I'm happy that I was able to meet him in this life:

I was a student in John’s Social Entrepreneurship class and I am very thankful to him for offering his last days to us. When I signed up for the class, I really didn’t know how it was going to be relevant to me because I do not envision myself as a business owner or ever achieving a level of wealth that would allow me to be an investor. But, this class wasn’t just a “how-to” for social entrepreneurship. John’s lectures were grounded in the real world in a way that I could relate to - he was just a real guy talking to us about how we could take in the problems of the world and think about solutions in a new way. I really appreciated learning from him and the way that he set contexts for the lessons through history and current events. I will remember him for his wisdom, ability to see things from many perspectives, and his helpful feedback. My greatest condolences to those close to him.

****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM MICHELE MIGLIULO, former employee of John's at TechGROWTH
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Athens News
Remembering John Glazer
To the editor,
In March 2015, John Glazer hired me as an Executive in Residence at TechGROWTH Ohio. I quickly discovered the truth in what I had felt about the man during my interview a few months earlier: John was dedicated and committed to economic development in SouthEast Ohio. Along with the phenomenal Faith Knutsen, John built a team of caring and genuine executives who drove the hills and valleys of routes 30, 50, and 13, meeting inventors and entrepreneurs, encouraging perseverance and commitment.
Always putting family and personal matters first, John built the organization in the more than 15 years that he led it, and created a powerhouse of goodwill. In later years, as higher management made a series of unfortunate decisions moving the organization away from its core mission of economic development, John joined Faith in founding the Social Enterprise Ecosystem, an organization focused on helping non-profit ventures, and continued his tireless, almost evangelical, mission of serving others.
John was the captain of servant leaders. John was the lighthouse atop the hills of Athens. John was father, brother, and partner to every entrepreneur in SouthEast Ohio and beyond. I send my eternal love to him, and will forever be grateful to have had the privilege to live by his side for a few short years.
Michele Migliuolo, Ph.D.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM CAROL CLARK, a Columbus-Ohio-based serial tech entrepreneur who started an angel investment group and made individual investments, one of which was in TechGROWTH client Ecolibrium. Through a very long and fraught time before that company was sold, John and Carol shared Board membership and Executive Committee leadership with the firm. The first note below was written in response to a request for memories for children and grandchildren; the second was written earlier to John in thanks for his untiring Board membership and leadership over all those years.
*****
We have known each other since early 2013, I think, when Ohio TechAngels and others first invested in Ecolibrium Solar, Inc. From the start you were the Secretary of the Board and the Minutes you have documented over the years are a marvel unto themselves, more like telling a story than merely writing company Minutes: verbose, chatty, discrete, perceptive, sometimes indirect, true. You also had a stint as Chair, but Secretary and chronicling those endless meetings were really your forte.
During the first year of Ecolibrium, 2013, events were a foretaste (or foreboding?) of things to come:
• The Board was formed (and the Chair of the Board was “retired”)
• Staff were hired, including a new CEO
• Finances were put in order, never to be that orderly again
• M&A was started, seemingly unending until a deal was done, seven long years later.
All the seeds were sown in 2013 for the future of the company: staff turmoil, financial turmoil, Board turnover unlike any I have experienced, endless M&A activity.
During all of these events, John, you were our calm rock, responsible, always dependable and following up when you said you would, seeing all sides of a potential decision, offering creative solutions to problems (sometimes, too creative and you left us behind), tactful (sometimes to a fault so we missed the point).
Oh, I almost forgot, John, your sense of humor – ironic but always gentle.
Finally, the assets of the company were sold in 2020, ending our regular formal relationship.
During this time I knew very little about your personal life. I knew you and Faith as separate people. One meeting between Faith and me, she mentioned that you and she were Life Partners; I was so very pleased to learn this! 
We started out as colleagues, John, but I think we ended up as friends.
Journey on, John, and know that you have many friends like me.
****

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM NANCY STEVENS, a senior faculty member at Ohio University who had engaged with John in the development of her Museum Complex, as well as other new ideas.

****
John was special in his uncanny ability to at once be firmly present in the conversation, and somehow light-years ahead in terms of where that conversation would ultimately be going. Focused on what really matters, he worked with ideas as though they were clay…patiently shaping, adding substance, removing unnecessary bits, and evoking purpose and meaning. His warmth and crackling energy filled the room, creating good and making space for new ideas.

****
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM FRITHJOF BERGMANN, an emeritus professor of philosophy at the University of Michigan, the thesis advisor and longtime friend and collaborator of John’s. John was a key editor for Dr. Bergmann’s “Being Free,” and a supporter and advisor in later years of his ongoing “New Work, New Culture” movement.
****
I loved John, seriously and intensely, and I admired him and respected him, during the many, many years of our close and heartfelt friendship. I very often came to John with some question or request, and in all the years of our friendship, (and I knew him when he was an undergrad at Michigan,) he never—not once—did not meet my request with an immediate, superbly intelligent response. The times when he contributed importantly to the work we did together are countless. Among the many things I particularly admired about him was that he, in every case, instantaneously wrote something that moved forward whatever we were doing together, and he always did it instantly, with grace and good humor, and with more wisdom than I had in me. He was a superb teacher, which came especially to the fore, when he guided a chain of bookstores, The Little Professor Book Store, and also the entrepreneurial work he did in Ohio. At moments like this, it is customary to speak of one’s loss, but in the case of John, this is poignantly true; I don’t remember a single conversation we had in the forty years we knew each other, in which I did
not gain from him, so the loss I feel, now that he is gone is not a mere phrase; I will miss him acutely and fearfully, and I will feel deprived now that he is gone.
Posted by F K on June 6, 2021
FROM STEPHANIE HOWE, Voinovich School colleague
****
Whenever I think of John, I think of his warm smile and his kind eyes--eyes that twinkle with mischief, with happiness, or with deep, deep thoughts depending on the occasion. When I watch John in meetings, I can truly almost see the gears turning in his brilliant mind as he jots notes in one of his omnipresent Composition books (oh what I would give to get my hands on one his Composition books ). John’s introspective demeanor is powerful in its simplicity and his modesty belies the dazzling depth of his intelligence and capacity to create and apply knowledge in inimitable and impactful ways.

I remember John showing a group of us how well he was doing after his hip surgery by dancing light on his feet and what a joy it was to see him feel so happy and free! My favorite times to see John is when he is with Faith. The two of them positively glow in one another’s company and clearly demonstrate the beauty of love founded in profound respect, mutual admiration, and boundless adoration of one another.

John has been a gift to everyone who has had the great fortune to work with him and know him. I count myself blessed to be a friend and colleague of John and Faith!

Much love always….Stephanie
****
his Life
OBITUARY

John Glazer, 69, left this world peacefully, in the arms of his beloved, from his rural Athens, Ohio home on 13 November 2020.

It was John’s habit to complete any request to others with “No is an okay answer.” Yet John lived by the premise that “yes” was always his own answer, whether that was the “slow yes” for his startup clients (to counter the investment capitalists’ “quick no”); the perennial “yes” to a few craft brews and a long talk about aspirations and evidence of things to come; the qualified “yes, and at the same time…..” to those with whom he had differences; or a twinkle-eyed “yes, but don’t get caught!” to mischievous children in his care. John was a man who lived “yes” to its fullest, from his earliest to his last days, with and for everyone he met.His “yes” eagerly met, with equal vigor, the world’s grittiest realities and the heights of intellectual exploration.

Born in 1951, the third of four in a working-class Philadelphia German-Irish Catholic family, John faced the cognitive dissonance of his times head-on.He confronted, at 15, the Monsignor of his seminary with a demand that the Father state from the pulpit his privately-asserted agreement that the US engagement in Vietnam was wrong.Hearing the response that such public repudiation of those in power would be politically inadvisable, John abandoned both his faith and his more conservative family for new vistas and new associates whose intellectual rigor and commitment to social justice were legendary.

Key among John’s mentors in his new base at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor—a nexus of that era of radicalism—were the late Stan Ovshinsky, renowned engineer and technology innovator; and Frithjoff Bergmann, emeritus professor of philosophy.John entered into a deep engagement with the justice, equity and peace movements of the 1970’s that formed his bedrock beliefs.He counseled draftees opposed to the conflict, driving them into Canada.He was an antiwar protestor (first as an enthusiastic teenager teargassed for the first time on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in DC and later as a leader, bludgeoned with a rifle butt while stepping aside for the police charging occupiers on the U of M campus).He joined heated debate regarding violent or peaceful protest.John chose the latter, along with his colleague Frithjoff, who initiated the first of the era’s peaceful “teach-ins.” John threw himself into the social melting pot, learning to be an active supporter of causes not inherently his own. Black friends welcomed this interested radical, introduced him to R&B, and educated him in their rationale for their own struggles.Female friends opened his eyes to the gender divide.One sought John’s help with the outcome of an abusive relationship, affording him a searing lesson when he escorted her to, and sought medical assistance for her after, a difficult backstreet abortion. John realized how to be a white male in a world heavily skewed toward the white male prerogative, and solidified his lifelong dedication to the oppressed, the voiceless, and the underserved.

When his beloved two children were born, John prioritized parenting and family support over the lecture hall, started a consulting business, and then joining the staff of bookstore franchiser Little Professor’s headquarters.John was named, in 1992, CEO of this largest association of independent booksellers.Simultaneously, he started and collaborated on multiple social enterprises in locations as disparate as Detroit’s Highland Park and Centurion, South Africa.When online outlets took over the book business, John found a job posting for the Director of a new program aiding technology startups in Appalachian Ohio.His immediate reaction: “That’s impossible.I’ll apply!”

John’s leadership, innovation and unstinting dedication to regional clientele was a significant factor in a successful initial decade for the Ohio University Voinovich School’s TechGROWTH program.His professional team guided hundreds of regional enterprises and entrepreneurs through enterprise development, often to successful funding.For those with appetite for his all-in style, John never stinted time for clients - whether working day, after hours, weekends or wee hours.His was significant and sustained support for successful enterprises on a vast continuum of innovators old and new: from Ohio Brew Week to Serenity Grove, Habitat for Humanity to Ecolibrium Solar, and tens and tens of others.

In 2018, John initiated the now three-year-old federally-funded program whose scope encompassed his life’s work.The Social Enterprise Ecosystem offers hands-on professional coaching and capital access to businesses that fill a vital social mission and also sell goods and services.John spearheaded the development of the “Social Return on Investment” methodology, which defines social impact in simple financial terms.In his last months, John’s lectures for Ohio University’s inaugural Social Entrepreneurship class underscored hiscontinuing exploration of the complex interplay between access to, and complicity in, the sources of power, from the machinations of the investment hierarchy to the monetary system. An evocative excerpt from his last lecture is here:https://youtu.be/gutBbfwypBo.

John’s memory is held in the heart by his son Nick Glazer; daughter Emma Gardner, husband Steve and two granddaughters; partner and best friend Faith and her offspring Lark and Rowan Knutsen; his sister Gerry Knapp and sons JB and Chad Ritchie; brother George Glazer and family, and innumerable relations, connections, friends, clients, and mere passers-by and correspondents who enjoyed so many vibrant interactions.

In lieu of flowers, donations are suggested to a fund created to honor and continue John’s enduring legacy for local social enterprises: https://athensfoundation.networkforgood.com/projects/115549-john-glazer-impact-fund.The John Glazer Impact Fund was inaugurated with the Athens County Foundationby Eli Flournoy and Hylie Voss, Mark and Wanda Weinberg, and Carol Beale and Faith Knutsen, in honor of John’s dedication to entrepreneurial spirit and his indomitable drive to advance sustainable, impact-driven enterprise.
Recent stories

FROM WESTON LOMBARD REGARDING TREE-PLANTING MEMORIAL

Shared by F K on November 10, 2021
From: Weston Lombard <westonlombard@gmail.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2021 8:00 AM
To: Knutsen, Faith <knutsenf@ohio.edu>
Subject: Memorial for John

Hello Faith,

With the anniversary of John's passing coming up, I've been thinking about him a lot and reflecting on how much he meant to all of us at the school and camp.  The board has been talking since he left about a suitable memorial to put at the farm and we finally landed on planting a tree with a bench next to it overlooking the orchard.  It is not much to look at at the moment but is symbolic in a few small ways.  I chose an oak tree: stalwart, farseeing, contemplative, giving, and relied upon by all members of the ecosystem.  Oaks have relationships with upwards of 3,000 different species and have been instrumental in feeding, fueling, and supporting the growth of human culture.  Being obsessed with trees as I am, I also sought out the best of the best oaks, one with durable wood and exceptional acorns suitable for human enjoyment, and possibly unique enough to someday be traded as a sort of alternative currency. The bench was made from local rot-resistant black locust lumber by my uncle just down the street from the farm.  The durable natural material will be here to see the oak tree grow to maturity alongside the school and camp and for hundreds of years after to preside over the better future that John has helped us all to build.  

Thank you also for all that you do. I miss John and appreciate him very much.  

I hope you are well,

Weston

From Emma Glazer Gardner

Shared by F K on October 24, 2021
From Facebook on 23 October 2021:
No surprise, Natalie's favorite memory is her and grandpa playing pirates. She drew a picture for him this morning.  Here you three are making some poor stranger walk the plank, and get carried away by a big wave. Eek!

I told the girls that when I was little, grandpa never got ice cream with Nick and me because ice cream always got in his beard, so we are having his favorite (chocolate milkshakes) today for his birthday.

Ten Hours: 5710 Social Entrepreneurship Lectures

Shared by F K on October 24, 2021
These are the pre-recorded lectures John created for Ohio University's inaugural Social Entrepreneurship class, during the last working months of his life.