ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Joe Aros, 74 years old, of Riverside, California, born on September 4, 1945 and passed away on May 11, 2020. 

Joe was born in Tucson, Arizona. He graduated from Pueblo High School and continued on to receive a bachelor's degree from the University of Arizona and a master's degree in elementary education (counseling) from California State University San Bernardino.

Joe was married to Sharon on May 11, 2000; they were married 20 years.

Joe worked as a high school guidance counselor for Riverside Unified School District at North High School for 38 years. He enjoyed grilling, watching westerns, drinking a cold beer, having a cigar, and spending time with his family.

Joe is survived by his wife Sharon, his children Joseph, Andy, and Gabriela, and grandchildren Alana, Ashton, and baby Avery, who will be here in July. 

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be given to the American Cancer Society https://www.cancer.org/involved/donate.html.

To contribute to his memory and honor his life, the family invites you to share a tribute or story of Joe and/or share photos of him on this memorial, which will remain active for years to come.

Posted by Susan Marchello Rickard on May 25, 2020
My mom always told the story of Joey walking down to the drug store and ordering a glass of water. He’d bring his own koolaid.
Posted by Susan Marchello Rickard on May 25, 2020
My family spent a lot of time with Joey. When he first moved to California, he’d be at our house every weekend. He loved his Uncle Bill & Aunt Jessie, but he really spent time with each of us. He really made a difference and had a life well lived.
Posted by Raquel Abel on May 25, 2020
I remember my Uncle Joe when he was a young man - my brothers and I would visit my NaNa and TaTa and Joe would always pull up in his Mustang and take us for a ride - always joking and laughing and teasing us just a little so that my NaNa would get annoyed with him and scold him. As much as he laughed and saw the humor in life every single day, he had a very serious side too. He was committed to helping the kids he worked with at school. He cared about people and was always empathetic and kind - I always knew that he was there, ready to help and support me in any way I needed. I didn't get to see Joe and Sharon and the kids a lot, but when we saw each other, it was always a warm, loving and very fun time for the family. He will always be in my thoughts. I figure he is sitting around with NaNa and TaTa now, having a beer while he laughs and teases NaNa, while TaTa reads his "scientific journal" aka the newspaper. 
Posted by Enrico Alcantara on May 21, 2020
Losing someone we love is nothing easy, but knowing that we have been able to be a part of the life of this person. We can realized that we are blessed to have been able to share in his life before he went to rest in eternal salvation. We loved you and you'll be missed Joe.

Ric and Ruby
Posted by Aros Family on May 21, 2020
“Mr. Joe, The Worlds Nicest Man”
Posted on behalf of the Seevers Family

Many years ago someone was asked to describe Joe Aros. Without hesitation they responded, “He is the worlds nicest man.” However, as his family and friends know he was much more than that. He loved his family, was loyal to friends, hard working, smart, honest, funny and trustworthy. In retirement he devoted hundreds of volunteer hours each year to charity. He was not easily swayed to the thinking of others but was always willing to listen and consider contrary points of view. He was a kind and gentle person who rarely showed anger or malaise towards others. Joe was a very complex wonderful person.

We were friends with Joe for almost 40 years. We shared many great adventures to the beach, bike races in Mexico, Old Town in San Diego, fishing, swimming, holiday gatherings, birthday celebrations, Halloween parties, weight training, a vacation to Alaska, projects at home and other experiences too numerous to mention. Our boys referred to him as Mr. Joe, a sign of respect and affection. One of our great joys was sitting around a fire pit at the end of the day having a beer while telling stories.

Working with Joe at John W. North High School was a privilege. He was always positive and supportive of all students. He enjoyed playing jokes on his colleagues. It was common to find Joe on campus late in the day still working with a smile on his face. He was a good friend and mentor to all of us.

There was a time Joe faced a daunting personal challenge. He stayed strong and focused on what was best for Joseph and Andy. Several years later he began dating Sharon. They were eventually married and Joe found the love and happiness he longed for. He also gained a daughter in Gabriela. He was a very proud father and grandfather.

Joe was the “go to guy” when anyone needed help or support. It is heart breaking that he is no longer here. We are comforted by the many wonderful memories of him. His legacy will live on in his children, grandkids and his many good deeds. Mr. Joe truly was the worlds nicest man. Descansa en paz viejo amigo.

The Seevers Family
Posted by Nel Bogie Alcantara on May 21, 2020
I come to know Joe when my niece Erica married Andy, Joe's son. Since then we became very close from each other probably because of Joe's sense of humor and we have one thing in common. When Joe and wife Sharon visited Andy & Erica in San Diego they stopped-by my mother's house or my place to see our big family. I and Joe will shoot the breeze, and a can of beer in our hands and had some conversations about the past, present and what comes in the future. There are many more things to be said about Joe and on...... We will be missing Joe but he will always be in our heart and mind.......
Posted by Erica Aros on May 19, 2020
My father-in-law Joe was such a big part of our lives. For the past 11 years, he has shown Andy and me unconditional love and support--he was so happy for us when we got engaged and married, cheered us on when we advanced in our careers, offered to take hedge shears to our unruly bushes when he visited because life is always hectic for us, and those are just a few examples of many.

Joe and my dad Ric became instant friends when our families came together. They shared many beers and glasses of whiskey together and talked about both nonsense and serious things. Joe always felt more comfortable staying at my parents' house when he and Sharon came to visit because he loved my parents' company (and probably preferred it over the chaos of our house). When my mom had her last chemo treatment, Joe and Sharon were there at the infusion center to help us celebrate. It meant so much to me that my in-laws were such dear friends to my parents.

Best of all, he was such a loving Tata to Alana and Ashton. When Alana was a baby and we lived in Riverside, Joe and Sharon took care of her while Andy and I went to work. He would cradle Alana while he watched his westerns and that was their first way of bonding. As she grew older and Ashton came along, he spoiled them with toys and surprises and constantly teased them and joked with them. He and Sharon came to visit us once a month when we moved to San Diego so they could give Andy and me a night out without the kids and we are so grateful for that. Joe always wanted Andy and me to be happy and keep our marriage healthy.

It's hard to believe that Joe will not be here for future milestones, but I know that he is proud of us, he will always be thought of when we reach each milestone, and he will be cheering us on in spirit.
Posted by Aros Family on May 16, 2020
Eulogy: My Baby Brother
Written by Beloved Sister Dr. Lydia Harris, Ph.D, J.D

Many years ago our mother bought my sister Cecilia and me each a chenille bathrobe. A green one for me and yellow one for her. She hung them on the door knob and told us that we could wear them when the new baby would arrive. Then in the early morning of Sept. 4 Aunt Lucy, who was staying with us at the time woke us up to tell us happily that it was time to put on our robes. Later that day Joey Richard was born.

He was a wonderful baby and we named him Joe after our Father. The name “Richard” was a name that I selected for some reason that I no longer remember. But we called him Joey Richard from that day on. 

As he grew up his two sisters showered him with all the love and care that we could give to him. He was our Baby Brother and everyone knew it. We loved him and he loved us. We were his Big Sisters all the time.

He went on to live a full life graduating from college, building a career, marrying having children and facing all of the things that one faces in life.

His children, two from his first marriage and one from his second brought him great joy. He found happiness with his grandchildren and would have enjoyed his future grandchildren. He loved his wife Sharon and told me that he so wanted to be with her at the end. He missed her when he was in the hospital. 

Joe was not perfect but while he was on this Earth he behaved in a manner that would have made our parents be proud of him. He was a gentle person. He was a sensitive man with many friends and was loyal. He rarely got angry. He loved his barbecue equipment and loved to cook for others. He loved his hot tub. He loved Peeps! At Easter time I would always send him some Peeps because I would say: “Joe loves Peeps” and so Joe will get Peeps!

I will miss my “Baby Brother” more than I can say. I cry now. I always thought that I could take care of him. This time I could not. He is with our parents. They will take care of him. Go in peace my Baby Brother.

Love…..

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Susan Marchello Rickard on May 25, 2020
My mom always told the story of Joey walking down to the drug store and ordering a glass of water. He’d bring his own koolaid.
Posted by Susan Marchello Rickard on May 25, 2020
My family spent a lot of time with Joey. When he first moved to California, he’d be at our house every weekend. He loved his Uncle Bill & Aunt Jessie, but he really spent time with each of us. He really made a difference and had a life well lived.
Posted by Raquel Abel on May 25, 2020
I remember my Uncle Joe when he was a young man - my brothers and I would visit my NaNa and TaTa and Joe would always pull up in his Mustang and take us for a ride - always joking and laughing and teasing us just a little so that my NaNa would get annoyed with him and scold him. As much as he laughed and saw the humor in life every single day, he had a very serious side too. He was committed to helping the kids he worked with at school. He cared about people and was always empathetic and kind - I always knew that he was there, ready to help and support me in any way I needed. I didn't get to see Joe and Sharon and the kids a lot, but when we saw each other, it was always a warm, loving and very fun time for the family. He will always be in my thoughts. I figure he is sitting around with NaNa and TaTa now, having a beer while he laughs and teases NaNa, while TaTa reads his "scientific journal" aka the newspaper. 
his Life

Spring 1975

Joe graduated with his Master of Arts from Cal State San Bernardino.

March 21, 1979

On March 21, 1979 Joe became a father to his first son, Joseph Dustin Aros.

March 14, 1983

On March 14, 1983 Joe’s 2nd son, Andrew “Andy” William Aros was born.
Recent stories

Joey At Pre-school Age

Shared by Mayetta May on May 25, 2020
One time way back, my parents and I were at the drive-in theater. It happened that Joe and family were in the row of cars ahead of ours. Lydia came over to talk with us. She then returned to their car to get ready for the movie. Soon, here comes little Joey by himself. My parents asked him his name. He said "Joey Richard Aros". My mother said he was so cute in his  enthusiastic response. She went on to tell his response over and over again.

From Richard Harris, brother-in-law

Shared by Aros Family on May 19, 2020
This is how I see my Joey, whenever I'm thinking of him. I see him as this skinny 14 year old sitting on the floor of the Plumber house with his legs entwined playing Solitaire. Tata was right, the nut doesn't fall far from the tree. They were both the kindest, gentlest of people. I am a little less without him.

Stories About Joe by his sister, Cecilia Aros Hunter

Shared by Aros Family on May 18, 2020
I’m going to miss my baby brother, Joey.  I have been told for so long to take care of him that now I’m I feel a little lost. 

When he was born he was so sick that my mother returned home without him. He stayed at St. Mary’s Hospital until he was stronger. But he was a fighter and he came home where my parents told me I would have to take care of Joey because he was not strong. We were lucky and for a while he lived a healthy, normal life until one day when he was about four years old. As our mother was driving on a road that was considered rural then, but is now the center of Tucson, four year old Joey announced that he wanted to go to visit our father at his shop downtown. Mama said it was not yet time to pick up Daddy from work and we would go later. Joey announced he was going immediately and opened the back door of the car and stepped out. He was seriously injured and rushed to the hospital where I remember everyone worrying that he was going to die. He didn’t die then either. I remember being told once again that I needed to take care of Joey, he would need my help. He came home and because he was a fighter he returned to a near normal life.

Then one night, I think about eight years later, we were awakened by a terrible trembling throughout the house as Joey fell from his bed in an epileptic seizure. Our parents took him to the doctors and he started another fight for his life. But, the struggle was too much for our mother and she too was hospitalized. As the big sister I was left to care for Joey. Daddy had two jobs to pay for all the medical bills and simply told me to take care of Joey. Recently Joey told me what I said to him at the time--that I was very busy since I had a job, was at the University, and I needed to take care of the house, so because of a pressure that had formed on his brain that was causing epilepsy he would need to inform me immediately if he felt sick, thought he might have a fever, or even got angry so I could get him to the doctor’s or the pressure might move and kill him. I was amazed that I could be so harsh, but Joey never made me feel that I was too harsh. He always made me feel that I was caring and the authority on all things. He made me feel important and that what I did was significant. I never saw him angry and if/when he was sick I never knew it. I think he treated most people in that kind and gentle manner. I think he made people feel important. He was a fighter and I admired him as much as he made me feel he admired me. He got stronger and one day, he told me, he simply woke up and felt like the sun was shining and the fog that had been in his head was gone.

He graduated from college, went to work for the Riverside school district, had a family and was successful. He was blessed to have the career he wanted. Over the years that followed we lived so far apart we were not able to interact much, but when I returned to Tucson we were once again in great contact.

While our father was alive he visited Tucson at least twice a year and we enjoyed each other’s company. After our father died Joe still continued to come to Tucson to visit grave sites and me and my family. He always came to be the chef at my very large Day of the Dead party. 

With our spouses we traveled together to Branson, Nashville, Rosarito and around California. I always knew I could call on him for what I needed.

When he called to tell me he had cancer I thought, he’s a fighter--he’ll get through this. I remember telling him that he would get through this too. We laughed about the things we’d seen and experienced together. But, this time I couldn’t even go to the hospital to help take care of him. I have seen and felt the pain of watching people I love die slowly and painfully of cancer. I was relieved that at least he did not have to endure that. I was happy for him that he did not have to die alone but was surrounded by the children he loved and his wife, Sharon, who he adored. I wasn’t there to help take care of him this time, but he was well cared for and taken care of. He lived a life for which he fought and I guess he was now tired enough to go gracefully and with dignity.

He was a kind, generous, gentle and strong man. He will be missed.

Adios mi hermanito.

Your sister Cecilia