ForeverMissed
On Sunday evening, March 28, 2021, Larry Myers died peacefully at his home. Age 78, he had been battling cancer and the consequences of an earlier MRSA infection for many years.

Larry was born on June 21, 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky to Lawrence G. and Thelma (Dupin) Myers. He grew up in the St. Matthews area, attended Greathouse Elementary, and was a member of Waggener High School’s first graduating class. Little League and Boy Scouts were favorite activities during those years. Larry particularly enjoyed weekends at the local Covered Bridge Boy Scout Camp and a summer trip to the Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico. He attained the rank of Eagle Scout in 1959.

College brought new challenges. After several semesters at University of Kentucky where he admitted to spending more time at the fraternity house (Sigma Nu) than in the library, Larry took time off and worked as a messenger at the Cape Canaveral space center in Florida.  He eventually earned a bachelor’s degree in Business from Eastern Kentucky University. A Master of Arts in Teaching from University of Louisville followed. On August 23, 1969, he married Beverle Graves. Larry and Bev raised two children, son Matt and daughter Megan.

Education was Larry’s first career. He taught Business subjects at Carroll County High School, where he was also an advisor on the school newspaper and sponsor of the National Honor Society. He enjoyed preparing students for the real world by teaching how to open a checking account, make a budget, file taxes, and even invest in the stock market. When Bev’s work took the family to Eastern Kentucky, Larry left the classroom for the local mental health center where he counseled teens who were having behavioral and family difficulties. He retired and moved back to Louisville in 2001.

Larry had a passion for cycling. He started with touring, completing many “century runs” of 100 miles in a day, then graduated to road racing. While studying at Eastern, he founded the Eastern Kentucky Cycling Club and was on the EKCC winning team of several state intercollegiate cycling championships. Back in Louisville, he served as racing chairman of the Louisville Wheelmen/Louisville Bicycle Club and was the Kentucky representative for the Amateur Bicycle League of America and United States Cycling Federation. He was also instrumental in bringing the 1976 National Time Trial Championships to the town of Carrollton. For these and other achievements and his unflagging love for the sport, Larry was inducted into the Kentucky Bicycle Hall of Fame in 2018.

Trains also held a fascination for Larry, possibly because he had so many relatives who worked for the L&N. Never a cold weather cyclist, Larry spent winter evenings and weekends building model railroad layouts in the attics and basements of his various homes. He was a member of the L&N Historical Society and based his models on their coal trains of the 1940s and 50s. Larry was also very involved with Matt and Megan’s activities and especially loved to watch their soccer and volleyball games. Bev found him a huge help in driving her and her books to various festivals and writers’ conferences. Friends, coworkers, and family will always remember Larry for his zest for adventure, dry wit, and helpful, loving nature.

Larry was preceded in death by his father, Larney, and his mother, Thelma. He is survived by wife Beverle and his children, Megan McKinney (Russell) and Matthew Myers (Tiffany), and four grandchildren, Nate and Sophia McKinney and Keegan and Taylor Myers. He also leaves sisters Marilyn Melton (Steve) and Jacquelyn Myers and brother Neal Myers (Sally), as well as a host of nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Larry was cremated according to his wishes. An informal remembrance gathering will be planned for the future. If anyone would like to make a memorial donation, Larry suggested the Kentucky Humane Society https://www.kyhumane.org/ways-to-give/donate or any animal protective agency of your choice.


Posted by Carson Torpey on April 7, 2021
I met Larry through bicycle riding or, bicycle racing. Larry was never going to make the Tour de France, me neither, but we talked liked we would. He was noe of the few who liked to talk about the bike races, especially the professional races. He always had other stories too. He always got a chuckle when telling of his high school days. He and friends trying to buy beer while underage. Or a friend trying to sneak out of the house with his dad's car for a midnight ride. Larry was one of the few riders I always liked to ride with. Just knowing he was in the pack was special. When I had my model train layout, Larry had plenty of train stories too. He made me a happier person by just knowing him.
Posted by Alison Torpey on April 6, 2021
I loved riding bicycles with Larry. He was a great talker, and the miles would slip away as we pedaled, and his story went on....and on....and on. It was such a treat when Larry and Bev would return to Louisville from homes in Middlesboro and Fort Myers. We were honored when Larry and Bev chose to live in the apartment we renovated over our bicycle shop on Bardstown Road. We always knew the gates would be locked and the building would be safe and secure. My daughter Lucy built a special fondness for Larry and Bev when she moved in to the adjacent apartment, her first apartment. She would tell stories of Larry hearing her steps in the hallway, him coming into the hallway and him sharing, again, some story that went on and on. Larry's stories were always good humored, dry bits of wisdom. Lucy just loved chatting with him, and that says quite a bit for an young 20-something girl. When Larry and Bev celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary, Lucy made arrangements to her work schedule so she could attend the celebration. We will always have a special memories of our friendship with Larry.
Posted by Marilyn Melton on April 2, 2021
It is so hard to believe how many years have passed since we were children. Lawrence loved building "forts" in the backyard. They usually had two floors with a trap door to get to the second floor. My sister, Jacque, and I and Lawrence would sleep in his forts for fun. He usually invited us so he felt safer. Two young sisters to guard him!  He also encouraged us to make tents out of our sheets at night when we were young and shared a large room.
We would hear my Dad coming up the stairs and scramble out and pull our covers up.
When my younger brother, Neal, came along and Lawrence was of age to drive he liked to take Neal for rides in his MG Midget. I remember when Lawrence and a friend, Donnie Gibson, took their sisters to a movie because they felt bad about ignoring us when they got to a certain age. 
I will miss my big brother and some of the stories he tells of h is memories. I know he is with our parents and grandparents now until I see him again.
Posted by Jacque Myers on April 2, 2021
So many memories . We were best buddies as children. I was his sports playmate, baseball, basketball, and football. Then
he grew and got into girls!!! He was a good big brother! Will miss his sense of humor, and his kindness. Rest in peace, big brother.

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Posted by Carson Torpey on April 7, 2021
I met Larry through bicycle riding or, bicycle racing. Larry was never going to make the Tour de France, me neither, but we talked liked we would. He was noe of the few who liked to talk about the bike races, especially the professional races. He always had other stories too. He always got a chuckle when telling of his high school days. He and friends trying to buy beer while underage. Or a friend trying to sneak out of the house with his dad's car for a midnight ride. Larry was one of the few riders I always liked to ride with. Just knowing he was in the pack was special. When I had my model train layout, Larry had plenty of train stories too. He made me a happier person by just knowing him.
Posted by Alison Torpey on April 6, 2021
I loved riding bicycles with Larry. He was a great talker, and the miles would slip away as we pedaled, and his story went on....and on....and on. It was such a treat when Larry and Bev would return to Louisville from homes in Middlesboro and Fort Myers. We were honored when Larry and Bev chose to live in the apartment we renovated over our bicycle shop on Bardstown Road. We always knew the gates would be locked and the building would be safe and secure. My daughter Lucy built a special fondness for Larry and Bev when she moved in to the adjacent apartment, her first apartment. She would tell stories of Larry hearing her steps in the hallway, him coming into the hallway and him sharing, again, some story that went on and on. Larry's stories were always good humored, dry bits of wisdom. Lucy just loved chatting with him, and that says quite a bit for an young 20-something girl. When Larry and Bev celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary, Lucy made arrangements to her work schedule so she could attend the celebration. We will always have a special memories of our friendship with Larry.
Posted by Marilyn Melton on April 2, 2021
It is so hard to believe how many years have passed since we were children. Lawrence loved building "forts" in the backyard. They usually had two floors with a trap door to get to the second floor. My sister, Jacque, and I and Lawrence would sleep in his forts for fun. He usually invited us so he felt safer. Two young sisters to guard him!  He also encouraged us to make tents out of our sheets at night when we were young and shared a large room.
We would hear my Dad coming up the stairs and scramble out and pull our covers up.
When my younger brother, Neal, came along and Lawrence was of age to drive he liked to take Neal for rides in his MG Midget. I remember when Lawrence and a friend, Donnie Gibson, took their sisters to a movie because they felt bad about ignoring us when they got to a certain age. 
I will miss my big brother and some of the stories he tells of h is memories. I know he is with our parents and grandparents now until I see him again.
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