ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of Lois Eberle: a mother, grandmother, great grandmother, teacher, and friend. She had a lovely smile, a great sense of humor, and a loving family who will miss her greatly.

We welcome any memories or photos you wish to share.

A graveside service will be held Tuesday, May 18th, at 11:00 am in Freeman Cemetery. 
Posted by Jan Larson on May 16, 2021
What a great lady and a wonderful teacher. I so wish I had known her better.
Posted by Dan Eberle on May 14, 2021
Sent in by Kara Schipper

.. Lois was an amazing woman with a huge heart and has helped us out tremendously throughout the past few years! I feel so blessed to have known her and had the conversations we had!!! Our deepest condolences to you and your family!
Posted by Amy Scott on May 13, 2021
I remember going to mrs. Eberle's home for a field trip. 
We were studying about the pioneer days. She taught us how make home made butter and homemade bread. I remember her peacocks the class got a peacock feather. She will be forever missed. ❤

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Jan Larson on May 16, 2021
What a great lady and a wonderful teacher. I so wish I had known her better.
Posted by Dan Eberle on May 14, 2021
Sent in by Kara Schipper

.. Lois was an amazing woman with a huge heart and has helped us out tremendously throughout the past few years! I feel so blessed to have known her and had the conversations we had!!! Our deepest condolences to you and your family!
Posted by Amy Scott on May 13, 2021
I remember going to mrs. Eberle's home for a field trip. 
We were studying about the pioneer days. She taught us how make home made butter and homemade bread. I remember her peacocks the class got a peacock feather. She will be forever missed. ❤
her Life

Lois's Obituary in Her Own Words

Who was Lois Eberle? Lois Milleson Eberle was the daughter of a gentle father and a loving mother. She was the wife of an honest, considerate husband. And the mother of five beautiful, talented children who were the joy of her being. 


Lois was born at Cyclone, MO, on April 11, 1929. She moved to Pineville at the age of five years and lived there until her marriage to Don Eberle at the age of eighteen. Their happy union lasted for many years. The last several years of her life were spent on a farm near Freeman, MO. 


Lois had three brothers and one sister. Warren Milleson, Virgil Milleson, Jakie Milleson, and Murriel Clemons. She is survived by three of her children, twelve grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren. 


Lois was a devoted wife, a so-so mother, and a dedicated teacher. She was a very private person in both religion and politics. A devout Christian and a fervent conservative, but she believed that a person should lead by example, not by rhetoric. She was an eternal optimist that believed she had the best of what life had to offer. She had accepted Christ at the age of thirteen and chose to live by his teachings.


Excerpt from Family History project by Alyssa Eberle Becho

Lois Milleson (1929-2021) was born April 11, 1929 in Cyclone, Missouri to Eldie Clifton “Jake” Milleson (1892-1982) and Jessie Juanita Cook (1898-1949).  She was the fourth of five (surviving) children. Today Cyclone is little more than an intersection of two rural roads, but in her youth it was a small town along the banks of Big Sugar Creek in the Ozark hills. Lois recalls going grocery shopping in the town as a small child. The spot was reportedly a Native American trading post originally, and was named Cyclone after a cyclone destroyed the area in 1880. Lois’s ancestors were among the first settlers of the area: her great-grandfather, Albert Cook, built the first grist mill along the creek and her other great-grandfather, James Cowan is credited with the first store/post office. The area was used for filming the 1939 film, Jesse James.

On her fifth birthday, Lois moved away from Cyclone and into the nearby town of Pineville. That fall, she started first grade at the school in Pineville. Though her brother, Virgil, was a year older, he was also in first grade and they would be in the same class for all of school. (Jessie had tried to send Virgil to school the year before at the one-room school in Cyclone, but after he got into trouble for playing with the big girls’ makeup during recess, the teacher declared him not mature enough for school and sent him home for another year.) Lois also credits Virgil with teaching her to talk- and giving her a speech impediment because she was imitating his incorrect pronunciations.

In 1946, Lois graduated from Pineville High School. She was Senior class President and Virgil was Vice-President. She was also a member of the yearbook staff, had a role in the Senior class play, and played volleyball. After graduation she attended Joplin Junior College for one year before marrying Don Eberle on her eighteenth birthday, April 11, 1947.

After their wedding, Don and Lois moved quite a lot. They lived in Cheyenne Wells, Colorado where they built and ran Don’s Cafe, then returned to Missouri when Lois’s mother was dying. Their oldest daughter, Donna Mari Eberle (1949-1987), was born later that year, in 1949. They then moved to Kit Carson, Colorado, followed by Lubbock, Texas before Don was called to return to the Navy during the Korean War. Lois completed a 60-hour teaching certificate in Lubbock. While Don was serving in the Pacific, Lois lived in Pineville again, and worked in the Draft Office. After the war, Don attended Pittsburg State University and Kansas State University with funding from the GI Bill and graduated in 1957. He then began working as a structural engineer for Black and Veatch in Kansas City. Their oldest son, Dan Ray Eberle (1953- ), was born in 1953 and a second daughter, Debra Kay Eberle (1957-2005), arrived in 1957.

Don’s work for Black and Veatch took them all around the country as they moved from one construction project to the next. They lived in Hill City, Kansas, Stillwell, Kansas, De Soto, Missouri, Polo, Missouri, Russell, Kansas, Soccorro, New Mexico, and Sandwich, Illinois, before finally returning to Belton, Missouri, near Kansas City. They had two more children: Douglas Arthur Eberle (1960- ) in 1960 and Deena Lynn Eberle (1966- ) in 1966. In nearly all of these places Lois worked as a teacher or substitute teacher and frequently took college courses in addition to raising her five kids. In Belton, when the Head Start program began, she was the first director.  The family then went to Thailand in 1967, where they lived in Bangkok for two years. The Eberle family still has friends in Thailand that they met during this time.

After returning from Thailand, Don and Lois lived again in Belton before they bought an 80-acre farm near Freeman, Missouri. After all her various courses, Lois completed her degree in 1974 from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. She began working at Midway Elementary School, only about two miles from their farm. This farm was a favorite place for family gatherings throughout her grandchildren’s youth. 

The original house was built by moving two older buildings together around 1880, it was added onto multiple times, and Don and Lois remodeled when they moved in. There was a stone wall to the west, which separated the yard from the pasture and in the center of the pasture was a large lake, which Don dug himself. The house was surrounded by many trees and the yard had a large forsythia bush, which was a favorite hide-and-seek spot for the grandchildren. They had peacocks for many years, as well as assorted cows, guinea hens, and other pets. 

They retired in the 1990s and continued to live at the farm. They were involved in various construction projects, including building rental properties in Freeman and developing a small housing development, The Cedars, on the north side of Freeman.


Recent stories

Ching Ching

Shared by Gina Eberle on May 13, 2021
From the first moment I met Lois, I noticed a warm and genuine smile and it didn’t  take long to notice she had an ornery streak. She loved to tease and stretch truths. She also LOVED to tell embarrassing stories about her kids. Don’t worry Dan, your crawling in a downpour on your hands and knees pretending you were hurt and Lois watching and laughing at the window or breaking gas station windows, or getting arrested, those secrets are safe with me and the kids and....well everyone now :). 

Lois had a huge heart and shared all she had with everyone. She wasn’t the best cook or housekeeper but no one cared because her priority was making people feel special, especially Don. I’ve never known another person to love another as fierce as she did. He was her world. She spoiled and doted on that man. She touched, kissed, hugged, and waited on him every chance she got. Love like that doesn’t come around often. I’m absolutely sure she is kissing Don right now making him feel like a king.

Lois loved on my kids and taught them not to be materialistic or narcissistic, for that I am eternally grateful.

I will remember her love, her smile, her heart, her wit. I will remember her going barefoot everywhere, bra-less, unshaven legs, peacocks, love for elephant knickknacks and green rice. Ching Ching really really :)

Grammy Pizza

Shared by Caitlyn Eberle on May 12, 2021
There are a few things in life I will always associate with Grammy: tea and pizza.
My siblings and I used to ride the bus to Grammys after school sometimes, and she would meet us at the driveway to walk us back to the house while we talked about school. We would set up camp in the fireplace room to do our homework, read, or color; and Grammy would go to the kitchen to make us a pizza as an afternoon snack. We called it "Grammy Pizza" and it was, honestly, the worst pizza ever to exist. But we always ate it, because we loved Grammy and she made it for us. And from then on, every time I eat a bad piece of pizza, I think of how it measures up against her awful, after-school snack. 
Grammy Tea, on the other hand, was the best. She would make a pitcher of iced tea in the afternoons; and where normal people would put in about half a cup or so of sugar, Grammy would dump in nearly half the bag. It essentially became tea-flavored syrup, and it was delicious. I would often ask my dad to "make me some Grammy Tea" and he would oblige. 
I hope reading this gives you a smile and a sense of the love that Grammy gave to me, and I hope it also sparks similar fond memories of her in your mind.