ForeverMissed
Our beautiful, vibrant, wife, mother, grandmother and friend, Maggie Carter, courageously died on July 22, 2019 after a long illness.

Margaret Ethel Frank Carter was born in Hyland Park, Michigan on September 19th, 1937, to Edward Eugene Frank and Callie Ethel Phibbs.

Maggie had a long career in Medical Histology. She was highly respected by her peers for her skill and depth of knowledge. Maggie was well accomplished in her field becoming the 4th person in the United States to pass the Histotechnologist exam.

Maggie married Wayne Anderson in 1954, later divorced, but their union produced 1 son and 5 daughters.

Later, Maggie married the love of her life, Steve, on October 16, 1993. Together, Steve and Maggie had many wonderful adventures, including moving to Puget Sound area in Washington before settling in Mesquite Nevada.

Maggie was always creative, but really found a community to grow as an artist in Mesquite. A founding member of the Mesquite Fine Arts Guild, Maggie was a talented painter in multiple mediums and genres.

Maggie is survived by her loving husband Steven C. Carter of Mesquite, NV. Her adoring daughters: Callie (Bryan) Birch, Maurine (Mike) Moffat, Susan (Josh) Lamb, Jo (Ron) Mugleston, Gina Anderson and step daughter Tracey Carter Snyder (Bryan). Maggie is also survived by siblings John Brent Cooling and Nanci Peters. She is loved by her 9 grandchildren (Carly, Michael, Nathan, Courtney, Nick, Dax, Sydney, McKael, Arielle), and 10 great-grandchildren, plus 2 step-grandchildren (Steven, Sierra) and many cousins, nieces, nephews and friends.

Preceded in death by her parents, her son, Robert Wayne (Andy) Anderson, her grandson, Lee Anderson and her twin brothers, Robert Eugene Frank and Charles Edward Frank, and brothers Walter Frank and Joseph Cooling. 
Posted by Carly Ammons on July 22, 2020
One year ago today, you left this earth. I think about you every day and miss you always. You are forever missed and loved fiercely.
Posted by Carly Ammons on May 20, 2020
Missing you today more than ever! Love you Grandma.
Posted by Carly Ammons on August 1, 2019
Posted on behalf of Maurine Moffat

If tomorrow had a dream
How lucky It would seem
To see you standing there
In all your classy flare
The light of life still shining
Before you went away
Then I wouldn’t have to miss you

If sorrow would just fly away
On the wings of a butterfly
The pain I feel inside me
Would slowly fade away
Maybe I could feel strong again
Then I wouldn’t have to miss you

In the shadows of the night
The loneliness comes back again
I saw a falling star
Disappearing in its flight
A part of me is missing
A star in my life
I wish I didn’t miss you 

As the wind blows so softly
I stand here in the trees
The leaves rustling all around me
I think I hear some voices
I think I hear you singing
But of course it isn’t true
It’s just my imagination
I’ll always be missing you

I miss you every moment
Life will never be the same
Thank you Mom for everything.

by Maurine Moffat
Posted by Gina Anderson on July 31, 2019
How does a girl of little consequence grow up to be such a glamorous and statuesque woman. A lady to recon with if one should rankle her ire. And yet sweet and tender. She posessed a true WOW factor. People could not help to stop and stare when she entered a room or just walked down a hall. Her joy, her laughter, her wisdom will never be matched in my lifetime. Missing you 'till the end of time.
My lovely mommy.
Posted by Nathan Maxfield on July 29, 2019
Grandma Maggie, you'll always be a beacon of hope, a pillar of strength, a source of warmth and light, and an inspiration in my life. Thank you for the words of encouragement and love you've always effortlessly given to me. I love you.
Posted by Lisa Hyte on July 29, 2019
To my dear cousin Maggie. I have admired you since I was a small child. I remember being captivated by your incredible beauty and gorgeous smile! You lit up every room you walked into with an incredible spirit and energy about you. Your inner beauty radiated out of you and was demonstrated by your kindness, your intelligence, your talent and your elegance. You will be missed by many. Thank you for sharing your kindness and talents and making this world a better place. Love, Lisa 
Posted by Mindy Bona on July 29, 2019
My beautiful Aunt Maggie. Your laughter was contagious and I loved spending time at your house as a child. I always remember you rubbing Tyler’s head because you swore it was good luck to rub a red head on the head.i always looked up to you. You were smart, classy, kind, & loving. I will miss you dearly
Posted by Susan Lamb on July 28, 2019
For my beautiful, talented mother,
I am so proud to have called you mom. You were my inspiration, always keeping an open mind and trying new things. You taught me to have compassion for others on this journey called life. Thank you for always being there for me whether I needed child rearing advise, a shoulder to cry on or just a friend to talk with. I will miss you my dear mommy.
I love you forever and always.
Posted by Steven C. Carter on July 28, 2019
You were my inspiration, the reason for getting up in the morning and will be the love of my life perpetually! 
Posted by Carly Ammons on July 28, 2019
I will miss you for the rest of my life. I will love you forever. Thanks for being the best grandma.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Carly Ammons on July 22, 2020
One year ago today, you left this earth. I think about you every day and miss you always. You are forever missed and loved fiercely.
Posted by Carly Ammons on May 20, 2020
Missing you today more than ever! Love you Grandma.
Posted by Carly Ammons on August 1, 2019
Posted on behalf of Maurine Moffat

If tomorrow had a dream
How lucky It would seem
To see you standing there
In all your classy flare
The light of life still shining
Before you went away
Then I wouldn’t have to miss you

If sorrow would just fly away
On the wings of a butterfly
The pain I feel inside me
Would slowly fade away
Maybe I could feel strong again
Then I wouldn’t have to miss you

In the shadows of the night
The loneliness comes back again
I saw a falling star
Disappearing in its flight
A part of me is missing
A star in my life
I wish I didn’t miss you 

As the wind blows so softly
I stand here in the trees
The leaves rustling all around me
I think I hear some voices
I think I hear you singing
But of course it isn’t true
It’s just my imagination
I’ll always be missing you

I miss you every moment
Life will never be the same
Thank you Mom for everything.

by Maurine Moffat
her Life

Maggie's Art

Maggie was an exceptional artist! She experimented with many different mediums, but her favorite was painting. Whether oils, acrylics, or watercolors, Maggie could paint it all. 

She worked hard at her craft and was a respected founding member of the Mesquite Fine Arts Guild.

Art

Yellow Flowers
Recent stories

Maggie's own story about her name!

Shared by Steven C. Carter on July 29, 2019
My given name is Margaret Ethel Frank. I was born September 19, 1937 at 3:15 p.m. at the Highland Park Hospital located in the city of Highland Park, Michigan. Because my mother was feeling really good on my birthday, and had started labor, and She had no way to get in touch with my Dad, so she left him a note on the table saying that she was going to walk to the hospital because it was such a beautiful day.

She decided about half way there that it was a mistake, because her pains got so severe that she would have to stop and lean up against a building. After the pain subsided, she continued to walk until the next pain occurred, fortunately, she made it to the hospital before I was born.

In the mean time my father came home from work and looked around for mom, he even went over to the neighbors asking if they knew where she was! Finally, He sees the note and goes to the Hospital. When He arrived at the hospital, I had already been born.

My mother stayed in the hospital for approximately seven days. Things and circumstances were so different back then. At the present, one would have a baby and walk out of the hospital the same day or the very next morning, that's quite a difference from the past.

My father said he took my Grandfather to see me when I was two days old and as they looked through the glass into the nursery, He said, "She doesn’t look like a burned match stick! Hell! She looks just like me" Apparently, my father had told my grandpa I looked like a burned match stick, all red, with a lot of dark hair.

A lot of things happened during 1937, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the president of United States. It was his second term in office. So, thanks to Roosevelt’s management, times were getting better for people after they had suffered through a depression. The new average price for a house would only cost $4,100.00. The average yearly wage was $1,780.00. Gas was only 10 cents a gallon. Renting a home rated around $26 a month. A loaf of bread was only nine cents, course that was not cheap for a loaf of bread back then. In the event one wanted to buy a cast-iron enamel tub with claws, it would cost $18.45. The reason I bring up the cast-iron tub is that I would still love to have one because they’re so deep and comfortable.

The year of 1937, was the year that the Golden Gate Bridge opened. Also, Amelia Earhart disappeared and her disappearance still remains an unsolved mystery. Additionally, that year, Author J. R. R. Toiken published The Hobbit.

When my mother was younger, she went by her middle name Ethel, as apposed to her first name Callie. So when my father and mother were introduced, dated, and finally married, she went by Ethel, which was the real basis for my name ending up as Margaret Ethel Frank instead of Ethel Frank.

When it came time to pick a name for me, my father loved the name Ethel because He loved that my Mom was named Ethel. She was totally against the name Ethel. When she was a young girl and would play with dolls, her favorite name for dolls was Marjorie. However, my Dad remained so adamant about the name Ethel, it caused my mother to think about my Dads mother that had passed away when he was younger. And her name was Margaret, so mom’s reasoning was that it sounded a lot like Marjorie- or to her Margaret sounded pretty much alike or close enough. So, a further assessment as to the reason I was named Margaret Ethel Frank.



 

 

 

Drive to school

Shared by Carly Ammons on July 28, 2019
One of my most vivid memories of my Grandma was one time when she drove me to school. It was fairly early morning and there were not that many cars on the Sandy streets.
We were stopped at a red light. Anyhow, we got to talking and fiddling with the radio. Well, the light to green then red again - we had no idea since we were so engrossed with our conversation. The guy behind us was livid! He swerved around us and proceeded to stick his head out of the window and yell and throw his hands up. He was so red...he was so mad.
Anyway, Grandma just kept saying, "I'm Sorry, I'm Sorry" in her soothing voice (which was funny because our windows were rolled up and he couldn't hear her anyway). Eventually, he calmed down, the light turned green, and off he went. 
After he drove off, Grandma started laughing and said "wow! he was so mad." She wasn't upset or anything - she wasn't about to let one bad moment ruin her entire day.
A beautiful friend once told me, "Your attitude determines your altitude." Maggie lived by that motto...even though I never told her that quote. She was the epitome of taking lemons and turning into lemonade. Love you Grandma!!