ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Marolyn Welch Tarrant. We invite you to celebrate a life lived with gusto, grit and grace.

We would love to hear from you. Here's a couple of ways you can share:

  1. LEAVE A SIMPLE TRIBUTE
  2. LEAVE AN ANECDOTE OR STORY
  3. ADD A PICTURE/VIDEO TO THE GALLERY

Posted by Will Crew on June 22, 2020
One of the hardest things about moving to Bend was the increased distance between me and the rest of my family. In a way, the added distance simplified some things: If I was going to be in town, I better see about visiting Grandma while I was there. 

She would always ask how things were going in Bend and what kind of fun I was getting into, depending on the season. She would tell me about how she used to love coming to Bend, whether it was going camping at Sparks Lake, cross-country skiing at Swampy Lakes, or just how beautiful she thought Mirror Pond was when she first saw it. I loved hearing her own fond memories of Bend and I think that helped me feel more connected despite the distance. I’ve never had any serious doubts about my move, but it was reassuring to have her sound so thrilled for me and to say that she thought it sounded like I was in the perfect place. I’ve always enjoyed those little reminders of her when I’m out skiing or biking in the same places she used to enjoy and I know I will cherish them even more now.




Posted by Jill Wissler Eiland on May 26, 2020
Linda, Bob and families, the entire Wissler family sends love and sympathy as you mourn Marolyn’s passing. She was always a family favorite, along with dear Warren. Though we met through the bond our parents shared, the Wissler kids count happy days boating and camping together before we got to the OSU house dance stage of our lives As a special connection to the Welch family. Warren was always there, keeping our secrets, and Marolyn was always happy to see us. I know your many happy memories shared during Marolyn’s wonderful life will stay stain your now. Thank you for your friendship. Jeff, Jill and Jon
Posted by Martha Osgood on May 21, 2020
Thank you so much for the warm, loving tribute to Marolyn in the R-G. The lump in my throat grew as I read it, even though I knew some of it.
These family stories are so precious. Gil and I might tell one of ours to folks who have not heard it yet, but both of us listen raptly as it is repeated with few changes (even in the pauses). I delighted in reading this obituary of love as a treasured glimpse into your family. Bless you for sharing and writing it so well.
I miss Marolyn, and her smile and wonderful outlook on life, but I’ve taken a little bit of her into me and thus can hold on to her for a long time.
Gil and Martha Osgood
Posted by Marilyn S Wiilson on May 20, 2020
I knew Marolyn from her time at Willamette Oaks. She was a delight to talk to. We loved it when she joined us for the basketball game watch. At first she couldn't understand why almost everyone here was rooting for Oregon, when she thought it should be Oregon State. But we watched a lot of games, and Marolyn would come down with her glass of wine and once even a gin and tonic - we all had such a good time! We miss her!!
Posted by Jay Locey on May 20, 2020
When you went over to see Bob back in the days of HS and college there was always a chance you would also get to see Marolyn. And you were actually hoping that you would see her. She was an added bonus to picking up Bob or hanging out at the Welch house. It was a bonus because of her consistent pleasant engaging upbeat spunky personality. She was fun and wasn’t afraid to throw in a playful jab once in a while. You always felt better from her presence. As my friendship with Bob continued over the years what was awesome was that Marolyn remained the same upbeat graceful pleasant person and seemed to perhaps be even more adventurous as she grew older-she dove in to life and lived large and full. What a great example to strive for! Thank you Marolyn for your beauty in living such a relevant and fruitful life.
Posted by Rob SCHUMACHER on May 19, 2020
Aunt Marolyn has been a bright spot for me as I enjoyed family get togethers, reunions and sharing beach cabin time over the years. She made the best Potato salad ever! Marolyn always took having fun to the next level. She made everyone feel comfortable and welcome in her presence. We will all miss her dearly. - Rob Schumacher 
Posted by Cammie Bella on May 18, 2020
Posted by Cammie Bella on May 18, 2020

I met Marolyn through our friendship at the Church of the Good Samaritan. The lovely obituary says it all. What a Light in the Darkness she was for everyone she met. I was able to visit her when she moved downtown to the riverfront. Each time we met, her inner and outer Light amplified the encounter and nourished my soul for the rest of the day. I am comforted to know she was with family at the end of her earthly journey. 
Posted by Mary Jeanne Reynales on May 18, 2020
Dear Linda Crew, Mary and Will,
I remember her smiling face, attending rehearsals and performances at the Majestic Theatre over the years. Thank you for such a beautiful obituary that made me cry, what a great tribute, A Wonderful Life...My condolences, Mary Jeanne Reynales
Posted by Janet Jarvis on May 18, 2020
I have a very happy memory of visiting Marolyn in her home when she invited our mutual friend Lois Meessen and my late husband and myself for a meal. There was a lot of laughter and it was such a convivial time. This was when Marolyn was a widow but still Welch. I always enjoyed her positive attitude and her lively conversation. Sending condolences to all the family and her many friends. 
Posted by Danny Miller on May 18, 2020
Bob; So sorry to hear of your Mom. Thank you for being a long distant friend and sharing the tribute pics. They are amazing. Your Mom was certainly adventurous and friendly to all. Certainly showed the love she was surrounded by as well. My wife and I send God's blessings to her, you, and your family....all the way from Kansas.
Posted by Robert Schumacher on May 17, 2020
As her brother I look back at how well we got along in the family as I can't recall any real problems we had in the life stage. I'll miss her greatly and cherish the days we had with out any problems in the life stage. We had very good parents to keep a good atmosphere while growing up. I know ill miss her till the end. she was a great sister. Schu
Posted by Brian Tarrant on May 17, 2020
What an amazing lady! Her life was full, and not always full of the positive things. But when the going got tough from some major setback, she always had the attitude that she could recover and move forward. And she did. She kept strong and she kept moving. And she got to see and do MANY wonderful things. She is a guide to follow.
Posted by Larry Weymouth on May 17, 2020
I first met Marolyn as a landscape architecture and political science student at OSU in 1970. She was so helpful and friendly to us all! Later that decade, we reunited occasionally around local political events. What a great blessing to have had in our community! 
Posted by Marion Whitney on May 17, 2020

Marolyn. 2020

In the evening after I had learned of my friend’s death I was watching a movie. Two characters were standing talking to each other. When the conversation came to the end they each turned with “Cheers” and “See ya” and walked away from each other. The camera lingered on the empty space for a minute or two and I stared at it. I thought that is what death is to an old person who has just lost a good friend, a space is left.  Marolyn will never walk into that space in her blue denim jacket that matched her blue eyes and blue toe nails. What will fill that space?
Her laughter and chatter, that woman could talk,. But also she asked questions and she listened, looking you straight in the eyes. She wanted to know about you!
Her enthusiasm for life, joy, fun and play, 4th of July “ ….meet me down by the river, right side of the band,“so two old ladies toddle down with their walkers, get settled with their beers. The band starts to play and they get up and dance.
“There’s a good band playing at the Senior Center, meet me there.”  I met her there and we showed off our stuff. Even at The Majestic, Pink Martini. The audience was invited to come up on the stage and dance. Two old ladies got up and danced on the floor in front of the stage with smiles of Joy.
While waiting for a table at a restaurant by the river, Marolyn got talking to the couple in front of us. That is what she did, she asked questions and listened. The couple admired her blue toe nails and by the time we got a table, they had invited us to their wedding.
Awareness of the beauty around her and she shared with me through poetry: April 2019 flood.
            Logs
trees
Branches
         Floating down
The swollen river
Sky splitting, rain gets my full attention

Marolyn and I started out the same year. That seems like a long time, but life goes fast. Marolyn reminds us to live with joy and enthusiasm. Thank you, Marolyn
Marion Whitney

Posted by Rick Bennett on May 17, 2020
Blessed to know Marolyn at the fitness center. Always a warm friendly hello and wonderful smile. Her energy at the fitness center was an inspiration for many during her workouts. I remember the excitement in her voice as she talked about Linda and her books. I always admired her telling me about all her adventures around the NW. For the family, I'm sorry for your loss but her memories will live forever. God Bless.
Posted by Doug Souvignier on May 16, 2020
Marolyn was the oldest of 9 remaining of 26 original first cousins on the Schumacher side. I always enjoyed being with her and later exchanging emails on just about any subject. We had a lunch gathering a couple years ago in Corvallis and after visiting her apartment she showed us the statue/ memorial of the Wizard of Foz (Bob's book) high jump champion Dick Fosbury. Always fun, caring loving and sharp; to use a description from the other gender, a woman for all seasons!
Posted by Matthias Engelbert on May 16, 2020
Dear Bob, dear Sally,

What a “sea of love” your Mom Marolyn has been swimming and immerging in! The words, the photos, the videos, the music on this page that you set up in her honor – this is all very touching and speaks volumes of the endless love three generations of Welch family felt and will always feel for her "GG".

We feel blessed that we had the chance to get to know Marolyn last August at your house during the work for your book. It was an unforgettable day! Her intriguingly happy character, her warm-hearted, empathic way of communicating, her sense of humor and her contagious laughter – all these memories are very precious to us. We were happy to stay in touch with her via email throughout her last months and we will keep Marolyn in our hearts.

We send you and all the family our heartfelt sympathies, our hugs and love from “Schumacher country” Germany.
We love you all,
Matthias & Beate

PS: I am happy to share a few photos of our unforgettable day with Marolyn at the beautiful Welch home, August 16, 2019.
Posted by Jeanette Bishop on May 15, 2020
What a wonderful person, who I actually met just a few times, but we seemed to hit it off, and I've considered her a best friend ever since. She was bright and funny. We talked about our parenting styles. I'll never forget hers. She said, "Benign neglect". I love it, and thought how right she was. We know her highly accomplished son and all the others. It worked. What a loss. I wish Marolyn's family comfort in their memories and love. I write with tears in my eyes. And love for all.
Posted by Ann Smart on May 15, 2020
I always loved working with Marolyn on League of Women Voter Projects. She had a fun laugh and a positive spirit. We also saw her a lot in Yachats as our beach properties were both on the fish streets. My husband and I often stopped on the 804 trail near hers and shared a kiss, so she started calling us kissy-kissy. Bill knew her in the Presbyterian Church in her later years. She will be missed.

I'm so sorry for your loss.
Posted by Shelly Murphy on May 15, 2020
Marolyn and I had many adventures together in our widowhood during these last two decades, too many to recount here. I have been reliving every one of those wonderful moments since hearing of her death. She was always outgoing (which i was not) and fun to be around. Always wanting to help where she could - the last time I talked with her just over two weeks before she died, she wanted an address to send a check for the homeless. It makes me happy to know that she was at home with Bob and Sally at the end. I, along with many, miss her greatly.
Posted by Chris Tarrant on May 14, 2020
Marolyn was always happy, upbeat, and loved to laugh.

My wife, Eloise, remembered when Dad and Marolyn capitalized on that mirth factor by announcing to their children, grandchildren, and other guests during their wedding day dinner that, "By the way, we aren't planning to have any kids right away!"

The shock factor worked, and the whole room lit up, as intended.

Posted by Rebecca Smith on May 13, 2020
I loved working with Marilyn via the League of Women Voters. She was a wonderful, classy woman. My condolences to all who loved her.
Posted by Marti Deanda on May 13, 2020
Bob and Sally and the entire Welch clan. I'm sorry for your loss. The brief times I got to sit with Marolyn and talk to her at Beachside, and listen to her stories, especially her boat accident, were some of my favorite Beachside memories. She was kind, and funny, and I was inspired by the life she lived. She had spunk, and tenacity and she was fearless. She was truly an inspiration. And of course she has left a legacy of love and kindness in her wake. Bob, you have your mother's humor and heart. She has left this world for another, a better one, but her light will continue to shine on everyone and everything she left behind. My thoughts and prayers are with your family. Lots of love, Marti.
Posted by Jane Kirkpatrick on May 13, 2020
Jerry and I got to know your mom as a writer first! Then the mom of the marvelous Bob Welch. We are so grateful for the brief moments we had with her, appreciating her sense of humor, her wisdom and her graciousness. Thank you for bringing her into our lives and I'm glad we got to thank her for bringing you into ours.
Posted by Mary Roshau Sawyer on May 13, 2020
It is a sad thing indeed to lose a loved one. The beauty of lives that touch one another is that, even when we don't have the privilege of directly knowing the deceased, their presence in others' lives leaves an impact on us by the legacy they leave behind them. Bob, I never met your dear mother Marolyn - yet my heart grieves in silence at your loss because of who you and Sally are in my life - therefore, your loss is my loss as well. Eternal rest grant her, O Lord, and may the Perpetual Light shine upon her. Patrick and Mary
Posted by Bob Welch on May 13, 2020
This, from my cousin Julie Verhagen, of Denver, Colo., who considered Marolyn a sort of "second mom" after her own mother passed away: 

So I loved every calligraphy letter you sent me. I’ve saved them all. I look for FORWARD TO REVIEWING THEM ALL ONNCE AGAIN. AND BY THE WAY YOU WERE THE Queen OF PICKING OUT JUST THE RIGHT birthday CARD. I’M SO GLAD I SAVED THEM ALL. SO WHILE I’M ON LASTING JOY I REALLY LOVE THAT blue used Cashmere sweater I bought off of eBay. I was thinking it would be a perfect color for Bronco game day wear. Well I’ve changed my mind about that. It’s now been renamed the "Auntie M. Ocean Crest Blue Sweater."

As we part ways, thank you for all the wonder memories you have left me with. All those family memories at the beach, eating lunch under the beach umbrella and trying to keep the sand out my lunch plate. I’ve felt your love over the years and I thank you so very much for that. Peace be with you.
God bless. Love, Julie
Posted by Jackman Wilson on May 13, 2020
We are sad to learn of Marolyn's passing, and were relieved to
hear that in these days of pandemic and quarantine she was able to
spend her final days in the company of Bob, Sally and other family
members.
   Heather and I knew Marolyn at one remove -- but even so, it was
a remarkably long and varied acquaintance. Marolyn and my uncle were
classmates at Corvallis High School. She worked in Heather's father's political science department for many years, which must have required the patience of Job. And we knew her through Bob, my colleague at the (Bend) Bulletin and The Register-Guard, both directly and by way of the stories he told in his columns.
   So I feel we knew Marolyn long and well, a conviction reinforced
by seeing her character reflected in her family. Times such as these
are never easy, and the fact of a long life well-lived offers little
consolation in a moment of grief. Our prayers will join an abundant
chorus of others.
Jackman Wilson
Posted by Stuart McDowell on May 13, 2020
We were late to the dance (again) in meeting Marolyn. She was 84 then. She was one of those people who we (confessed to ourselves) wished we had met much earlier in life. There was a magnetism to her; an internal joy for life that one could only admire--and then try to emulate. And she loved her family. That was as easy to recognize as the carvings on Mount Rushmore.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Will Crew on June 22, 2020
One of the hardest things about moving to Bend was the increased distance between me and the rest of my family. In a way, the added distance simplified some things: If I was going to be in town, I better see about visiting Grandma while I was there. 

She would always ask how things were going in Bend and what kind of fun I was getting into, depending on the season. She would tell me about how she used to love coming to Bend, whether it was going camping at Sparks Lake, cross-country skiing at Swampy Lakes, or just how beautiful she thought Mirror Pond was when she first saw it. I loved hearing her own fond memories of Bend and I think that helped me feel more connected despite the distance. I’ve never had any serious doubts about my move, but it was reassuring to have her sound so thrilled for me and to say that she thought it sounded like I was in the perfect place. I’ve always enjoyed those little reminders of her when I’m out skiing or biking in the same places she used to enjoy and I know I will cherish them even more now.




Posted by Jill Wissler Eiland on May 26, 2020
Linda, Bob and families, the entire Wissler family sends love and sympathy as you mourn Marolyn’s passing. She was always a family favorite, along with dear Warren. Though we met through the bond our parents shared, the Wissler kids count happy days boating and camping together before we got to the OSU house dance stage of our lives As a special connection to the Welch family. Warren was always there, keeping our secrets, and Marolyn was always happy to see us. I know your many happy memories shared during Marolyn’s wonderful life will stay stain your now. Thank you for your friendship. Jeff, Jill and Jon
Posted by Martha Osgood on May 21, 2020
Thank you so much for the warm, loving tribute to Marolyn in the R-G. The lump in my throat grew as I read it, even though I knew some of it.
These family stories are so precious. Gil and I might tell one of ours to folks who have not heard it yet, but both of us listen raptly as it is repeated with few changes (even in the pauses). I delighted in reading this obituary of love as a treasured glimpse into your family. Bless you for sharing and writing it so well.
I miss Marolyn, and her smile and wonderful outlook on life, but I’ve taken a little bit of her into me and thus can hold on to her for a long time.
Gil and Martha Osgood
her Life

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LEAVE A SIMPLE TRIBUTE

In the ABOUT-LIFE-GALLERY-STORIES-ADMIN menu across the top, 
click on ABOUT.

Click on "Leave a Tribute."

Write your message.

Press on "Publish"

LEAVE AN ANECDOTE OR STORY

In the ABOUT-LIFE-GALLERY-STORIES-ADMIN menu across the top,
click on STORIES, then:

— Scroll through other people's remembrances until you see a blank "Share a story" template.— Give your remembrance a title.
— Write something about Marolyn.
— Add a picture, video or bit of music.
— Click on "Publish."

Thank you!

A 4-minute video of what Marolyn called "a wonderful life"

In April 2017, we gathered at Adair Village north of Corvallis to celebrate Marolyn's 90th birthday. This was the video we showed her, the only change being the words at the end.

Marolyn Welch Tarrant: Her life in a nutshell

Marolyn Welch Tarrant — wife, mother, mother-in-law, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt, friend, sailor, camper, environmentalist, political activist, community volunteer and two-time cheater of death — died May 12 in the Eugene home of her son Bob  and daughter-in-law Sally. She was 93.

Marolyn — yep, with an “o” — was born March 9, 1927 in Corvallis, Oregon, the second daughter of Ben and Gayle Schumacher. She lived in Corvallis her entire life until moving to Eugene’s Willamette Oaks Retirement Community six months ago.

“I used to regret that I wasn’t able to leave Corvallis,” she wrote in 1999. “I thought someplace else would be more exciting. I now realize that it was where I was supposed to be.”

She felt the same way about Eugene, where she moved last November. Interviewed a month ago about life without being able to leave her room for 37 days because of the coronavirus, she said, “If I have to be in lockdown, I can’t think of a better place to be.”

She was admitted to PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend on April 24 and diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. Unable to return to Willamette Oak, she lived her final 12 days at her son and daughter-in-law’s house, assisted by PeaceHealth Hospice, which, by the way, rocks.

Marolyn had a “kick-the-can” childhood that she cherished — even though she lived most of it during the Depression. As a 15-year-old sophomore at Corvallis High, she was attending a back-to-school dance in the late summer of ’42 when a few Oregon State College boys showed up uninvited. Among them was OSC freshman Warren Welch.

“He was the cutest guy I’d ever seen,” she said.

In the school gym, they were dancing in front of the drinking fountain and the band was playing the Glen Miller favorite “At Last,” a line of which says, “You smiled and then the spell was cast.”

After the dance, as if in a scene from “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Warren walked her home, asking her if they could catch a movie the next night. Marolyn’s mother squelched Welch. “You know we don’t allow you to date college boys,” she told her daughter.

“But, Mom,” Marolyn protested, “he doesn’t start school until Monday. Technically, he’s not a college boy — yet.”

“OK. But just this once.”

After Warren’s discharge from the Navy, the two were wed on August 11, 1946 at First Methodist Church in Corvallis. The “just-once” date became a marriage that lasted 50 years and two days. (In 2005, just before CHS was to be torn down and replaced, Marolyn bought the drinking fountain in the old gym for $78.13. And the couple’s 22-foot Catalina sailboat was named “At Last.”)

She attended Oregon State, where she was an Alpha Chi. Later, she became involved in what she would call her life’s greatest achievement: “My kids.” Daughter Linda (Crew), born in 1951, is an Oregon Book Award-winning author. Son Bob, 1954, is an author and was a longtime "Register-Guard" features writer, features editor and general columnist.

Marolyn was a Campfire Girls leader for 10 years and enjoyed the experience. “It allowed me, as an adult, to do all the fun things I did as a kid, like ice skating in Portland, without having to feel guilty.”

She worked as a secretary for a handful of departments at Oregon State, including Landscape Architecture and Political Science, the latter of which named its library after her.

Marolyn loved family-and-friends camping trips at Detroit Lake, Suttle Lake and, particularly, Cultus Lake. It didn’t take much to keep her happy. When the family would launch its 14-foot homemade boat each spring, she would — assuming the motor started — lean back like a Hollywood star and say with great flair, “I wonder what the peasants are doing today.”

She could be quirky — in the best of ways. At Thanksgiving 1972, she showed up for son Bob’s Turkey Bowl football game dressed in her 1942 CHS rally uniform, leading cheers that had not been heard since the time of the Roosevelt Administration.

In 1977, Marolyn was critically injured in an automobile accident after a day of cross-country skiing on the North Santiam Pass. Doctors cautioned family members that she might not survive the night. She spent months at Memorial Hospital in Salem and at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, but ultimately returned to good health — and skied again.

A calligrapher, she had a handful of favorite sayings she liked to share. Among those she penned for friends: “Time is so precious that it is dealt out to us only in the smallest possible fractions — one moment at a time.” And “We can’t direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.” Asked for her favorite inspiration, she said, “I don’t really think you can improve on the 10th Commandment: ‘Do unto others as you would have others do unto you.’”

She and Warren sailed at Oregon’s Fern Ridge Lake and Waldo Lake, Washington’s San Juan Islands and British Columbia’s Gulf Islands and Desolation Sound. Nearly every trip began with her saying the same thing: “I just love the sound of water on the side of a boat.”

With her husband’s reluctant blessing, she spent a week sailing the Virgin Islands as part of the Womanship program. Other favorite trips: plying the Inland Waterway from Charleston, S.C., to Jacksonville, Fla., with daughter Linda and the annual four-generation "Jungle Cruise" on Fern Ridge's Coyote Creek with her great-grandchildren. 

In 1996, Warren died at Black Butte Ranch after he and Marolyn celebrated their golden anniversary.

Two years later, at 71, Marolyn once again nearly died when a tour boat she was on capsized in the Galapagos Islands. Four people drowned in an incident that made international news. After attending a handful of son Bob’s Beachside Writers Workshops, she wrote a self-published Amazon-available book — “more like a pamphlet,” she joked — about the incident called "The Survivors."

On Nov. 30, 2002, she married a former OSU Department of Forestry professor, Bob Tarrant, whose wife had recently died of cancer. Their first date had been a hike in the hills north of Corvallis, for which Marolyn prepared a pot of soup just in case Bob wanted to stop by afterward. Later that evening, Linda phoned her brother. “Bob stayed for the soup!"

Bob Tarrant and Marolyn enjoyed trips to Hawaii, Nova Scotia, Puerto Rico and New Orleans; beach-walking in Yachats; and fishing with Bob’s son, Chris, a guide on the Rogue River. Bob died April 6, 2006 at 88.

“No regrets,” Marolyn said of the marriage, which lasted less than four years. “I’d do it all again.”

Marolyn was the ultimate people person. In her northwest Corvallis neighborhood, she organized the neighborhood potluck for 49 years. To celebrate the 40th year anniversary of the beach cabin her father had bought in Yachats in 1936 for $500, she organized a family gathering that involved 16 events, leaving “thirty minutes for free time.”

Except for Robert Redford, who sent her an autographed photo when she was recovering from her auto accident, she never fawned over celebrities. However, she had deep respect for President Barack Obama, Oregon Govs. Tom McCall and Oswald West, and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose stand-up doll—on a skateboard—witnessed her final breath.

Her musical tastes ranged from The New Christy Minstrels to Pink Martini. Her local favorites were Corvallis musician Neal Gladstone and world-renowned trumpet player Chris Bottii, who grew up four houses away from the Welches and who was occasionally babysat by Marolyn’s future daughter-in-law, Sally.

When asked for her favorite movie as a security question on accounts, Marolyn invariably chose “When Harry Met Sally.” She particularly liked the “I’ll-have-what-she’s-having” line.

She volunteered as a Court-Appointed Special Advocate for Children, delivered Meals on Wheels and, into her 90s, volunteered at a Corvallis soup kitchen for the homeless. She donated to countless organizations, among her favorites the Corvallis Boys & Girls Club.

Marolyn became politically active in the late 1960s, among her first causes to help stop a proposed dam on the South Santiam River. A Democrat, she was active in League of Women’s Voters and served as president of the Corvallis chapter for two years. At 92, she testified against the building of a proposed student housing project on Oregon State’s lower campus. She received a rousing ovation.

She liked politics but what really floated her boat was family. Besides her children and their spouses — Bob’s wife, Sally, and Linda’s husband, Herb — she is survived by five grandchildren: Ryan, and  wife Susan, of Eugene; Miles, and  wife Ziwei, of Corvallis; Jason, and wife Deena, of Eugene; Mary, and  wife Jaci, of Portland; and Will Crew, of Bend. She had eight great-grandchildren — with a ninth in the oven.

In addition, she is survived by a brother, Bob Schumacher, of Eugene; nieces Julie Verhagen of Denver, Colo., Penny Welch, and husband Bill Southworth, of Portland, and Kathy Reed, and husband Tom, of Springfield; nephews Rob Schumacher, and wife Sherry, of Eugene, Steve Schumacher, and wife Johnna, of Columbia City, and Bill Welch and John Pesonen, of Portland; stepsons Brian Tarrant, and wife Cindy, of Bend, and Christopher Tarrant, and wife Eloise, of Eagle Point; and stepdaughter Stephanie “Taffy” Martin, and husband Larry, of Albany. A sister, Nadine Verhagen, preceded Marolyn in death.

In her own words, Marolyn’s was a “wonderful life.” For a book, when asked to recall her favorite memories, she wrote: “This space is really too small for that.”

Donations in her name can be made to the Corvallis Boys & Girls Club, 1112 NW Circle Blvd., Corvallis, OR 97330.

A memorial service has been planned for 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020 at First Presbyterian Church, 114 SW 8th St., Corvallis. Meanwhile, people are invited to learn more about her, celebrate her life and leave remembrances at: https://www.forevermissed.com/marolyn-welch-tarrant

Musgrove Mortuaries & Cemeteries of Eugene is handling arrangements. Marolyn’s ashes will be spread in the Pacific Ocean at Yachats, were she had first played in the sand at age 7 and walked barefoot on the beach at 92.


Recent stories

Cultus Lake memories

Shared by Jon Wissler on May 27, 2020
My family was introduced to the wonders and beauty of camping at Cultus Lake in the 60's and they remain some of my most fondest memories to this day.  Marolyn and Warren were experienced campers and were sorority (Alpha Chi) and fraternity (Sigma Alpha Epsilon) mates with my parents at OSU.  Marolyn and Warren were avid outdoors enthusiasts and introduced me to hiking, fishing and sailing in a small sailboat Warren hand built.  Their son Bob, who I idolized, would take me out in the boat and try to teach me to sail.  We had some great times there over a period of approximately 10 years before the kids reached their late teens and began to wonder off into their own lives.  The experience left such a lasting positive impression on me that I took my own family there for a handful of camping adventures in the late 90's and have been wanting to go back ever since.

Marolyn was a vivacious personality and always made sure the kids were having fun.  She introduced me to new gastric wonders like smores, bread on a stick and other dessert delicacies that would have been hard to pull off in a camping environment.  My memories of her family and the experiences we shared in those times are some of my most favored treasures.

I was fortunate to stay connected somewhat after our Cultus days during my time at OSU where I also became an SAE.  Warren was a photographer who did all the house party photo's over the years and I had the privilege of sharing a beer with him a time or two.  Marolyn's father was an SAE icon (Brother Ben) who was revered by all and would make occasional visits to the fraternity.  I had the pleasure of visiting with Marolyn when the chapter celebrated 100 years in 2015 and she was as vibrant as ever.

Reading about all of her activities and adventures paints a picture of a remarkable women, mother, wife and friend.  I'm glad she was able to lead a long and full life filled with rich memories and accomplishments.  May she rest in peace.
Shared by Jette Baker on May 20, 2020
If I ever grow up I want to be just like Marolyn. I met her in two ways, one as a fellow participant in one of Bob’s writing workshops and the other through Bob’s own writing. I loved those bits and am so honored to have been a mere blip on the radar of her life. Had just contacted her in April as we enjoyed encouraging one another with our writing projects. I do not know if she read this, so I’ll say it here—my last words to her were: I just wanted to say that I think you are quite remarkable. I wish I was closer so we could go sailing together sometime and drink wine
Shared by Marilyn S Wiilson on May 18, 2020
During her short time at Willamette Oaks, Marolyn enjoyed watching Oregon and Oregon State basketball games with a group of residents here.  She was always ready to cheer with a glass of wine or even once a gin and tonic!  We all enjoyed her so much!   We will miss those times together.