ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our father, Michael Green.
Michael's last illness and passing sadly took place during the Covid-19 pandemic and restrictions prevented many of us from visiting him and spending time with him as we, and he, would have wished. Michael was very sociable and loved entertaining and sharing conversation and jokes with his large extended family and his friends. We, his daughters, hope that you will join us in adding your memories and thoughts and wishes here on this website, to celebrate his life and the unforgettable memories he has left us all with, and to come together even if we can't all be at the funeral together. He'd have liked that very much.

Michael's funeral Mass will take place at St Dunstan's Catholic Church, Langport Road, Somerton TA11 6RS on Wednesday, June 2nd at 12:30pm, then afterwards at 2.30pm at Mendip Crematorium in Croscombe, near Wells: Old Wells Road, Croscombe, Wells, Somerset BA5 3RR. Refreshments and a celebration of Michael's life will be held afterwards, from about 3.15pm to 5pm, at The Barton Inn, Main Street, Barton St David TA11 6BZ. There will then be the option to move to Kathy's garden a few doors down from The Barton Inn.

The interment of Michael's ashes is scheduled to take place at 3pm on Thursday 3rd June at Somerton Cemetery.

Unfortunately numbers are limited due to Covid restrictions. Because of this we ask you to contact us if you hope to attend. The Mass will be broadcast over the web so we hope everyone will feel part of the ceremony. If you will be joining us in person, please consider taking a lateral flow test before attending.

This is the livestream links for the Mass.
https://www.icebox-media.co.uk/michaelgreen
The password is michaelgreen 
The recording will be accessible after the service.
Click on this link to access the Order of Service:
https://uniofnottm-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/persona...

May he rest in peace. We will always remember him and carry him in our hearts.

The immediate family will provide the flowers for the casket, so we are not asking for flowers from other family and friends. We would welcome donations to St Margaret's Hospice who helped and supported Dad and the whole family through his illness. If you would like to make a donation to St Margaret's Hospice in Michael's name, please visit Michael's Tribute Fund page. If you feel that you would like to give flowers, we are using the following florist based in Somerton: https://www.bloominglinda.co.uk
Posted by Julian Melfi on June 1, 2021
With all our love and heartfelt condolences to all the family. Michael will be greatly missed. Always full of life and fun.
The Melfi family - Dorio & Sheila, Julian & Sharon, Nigel and Tracey
Posted by Anne-Marie Blewitt on June 1, 2021
Uncle Mike was such a presence throughout my life and took a genuine loving interest in everything I did as a child, young person and adult. He showed the same care in following the many twists and turns in the lives of all the family, always remembering what the kids were up to. He sent lovely cards and letters over the years, always taking the trouble to write a personal message - and one from Josette too. These and time spent in happy and relaxed conversation - often with glass in hand! - helped to fill the gaps in my knowledge of family history, particularly about my father John. He was such a central person in our family and helping to keep us connected to the Green clan, and I have a great many fond memories of family gatherings at 'Red Tiles' with Mike as the perfect host, and of many hours in conversation and debate with him. We didn't agree on everything(!) but it didn't matter - the mark of a strong family relationship. Rest in peace dear uncle, you are so missed, Anne-Marie xxx
Posted by Emma Agulló on June 1, 2021
Grandpa was born on the 18th November. I was born at 12.15am on the 19th November - in Spain, where the time zone is one hour ahead. Grandpa always said I was born on the same day as him, and that we were twins.

This month I lost my twin. I love you Grandpa, you will be missed.
Posted by Chris Radloff on May 30, 2021
Upon learning that Michael was educated by the Jesuits it became clear that this Ignatian Spirituality contributed to the full life he led. He radiated wonder and gratefulness and allowed his imagination and emotions and intellect to perform so well.
I felt affirmed as he listened attentively and then conversed so easily. He blended so well with Josette and my first and abiding impression of Red Tiles is a superbly hospitable couple with a slightly balding gentleman who would draw himself to full height and with arms akimbo would deliver a humorous quip or change into comical pose. He endeared himself to us and to many-I'm sure . May Josette and your family be comforted. Chris and Hilary. I have included a picture of Duncan Abraham who was married to Sonny's eldest sibling Sybil , was a photographer during WW2 and lived in South Africa and was possibly the person who photographed Denis Compton's wedding as narrated to his grandson ! Duncan filmed our wedding in his latter days !
Posted by Richard Essam on May 28, 2021
Michael and Josette brought enormous good cheer and joy to our small cul de sac in Street these past five years. Chris and I miss them very much. Tales of Compton and Edrich, and Mike’s reminiscing on the halcyon days of Middlesex C.C., will accompany all future visits to Lords. And he played no mean innings himself. Appreciative applause from around the ground.
Posted by Lorna Nicholls on May 28, 2021
We were all so very sad to hear of Mike's passing. Our deepest sympathy and warmest thoughts go to Josette and the girls. Such a sad time, intensified by the Covid pandemic. We will always remember Mike with a smile and a chuckle. He was a special being for many, including my mum and aunt (Jean & Pam). Mike was a frequent visitor to their home back in the day. The fun and shenanigans with his cousins and our younger grandparents made for very entertaining tales. Many involving nan's wheelchair . Our grandparents were Cecilia (child 6 of the 16) and Albert Raymont. Sending much love and warmest hugs to Josette xx
Posted by Donna Ralston on May 26, 2021
From the very first time I went to Red Tiles with Kathy many years ago, Mike always seemed delighted to see me and he always made me feel extremely welcome and at ease. Billy admired how well he coped being the only
man in a house full of slightly mad women!
I hold many memories of silly conversations and raised eyebrows! God bless you.
Donna x
Posted by Natalie Green on May 25, 2021
A Mass is being offered on Sunday 30th May at 11 am in our Loughton Catholic Church for Michael, whom we dearly miss.

Arthur and Jenny xx
Posted by Kate Baxter on May 23, 2021
With love and so many very fond and humorous memories - your wit, your dinner conversations, your love of your family, your enjoyment of fine wines and beautiful meals late at night, then a drive back to Shoreham!!! Mike you have been so special to all our family since we left Africa in 1964 - I remember Josette chasing you around the bedroom as I was changing Alex, after his Christening, as she wanted the opportunity to have a son!!!! spontaneous and so suitable at the time - happy times, wonderful memories always RIP dearest MIke
Posted by Andrew Button on May 18, 2021
I will always remember Mike’s natural, instinctive sense of fun and playfulness especially with the children of my late wife, Rose and I. Also, his generous spirit and keen, rapier like wit. He was the King of Quips!
I identified with his love of wine, culture and cricket and always felt that I could spend timeless hours listening to his wise words.
Posted by Mike Bligh on May 17, 2021
I will treasure fond memories of Michael from our first meeting back in 1980, where we bonded over our mutual appreciation of Arsenal FC and Test Cricket to our last in 2019 when I was able to find and return a book he had lent me in 1981 ! Typical of the man he had not forgotten that and in the same way I will never forget him. RIP Michael, a life well lived.
Posted by Beth Chapman on May 16, 2021
Rest In Peace dearest Mike. You shall be very dearly missed with your quick witted humour. You always made me laugh.
Posted by Natalie Green on May 13, 2021
Rest in peace. Strife and troubles have ceased.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Julian Melfi on June 1, 2021
With all our love and heartfelt condolences to all the family. Michael will be greatly missed. Always full of life and fun.
The Melfi family - Dorio & Sheila, Julian & Sharon, Nigel and Tracey
Posted by Anne-Marie Blewitt on June 1, 2021
Uncle Mike was such a presence throughout my life and took a genuine loving interest in everything I did as a child, young person and adult. He showed the same care in following the many twists and turns in the lives of all the family, always remembering what the kids were up to. He sent lovely cards and letters over the years, always taking the trouble to write a personal message - and one from Josette too. These and time spent in happy and relaxed conversation - often with glass in hand! - helped to fill the gaps in my knowledge of family history, particularly about my father John. He was such a central person in our family and helping to keep us connected to the Green clan, and I have a great many fond memories of family gatherings at 'Red Tiles' with Mike as the perfect host, and of many hours in conversation and debate with him. We didn't agree on everything(!) but it didn't matter - the mark of a strong family relationship. Rest in peace dear uncle, you are so missed, Anne-Marie xxx
Posted by Emma Agulló on June 1, 2021
Grandpa was born on the 18th November. I was born at 12.15am on the 19th November - in Spain, where the time zone is one hour ahead. Grandpa always said I was born on the same day as him, and that we were twins.

This month I lost my twin. I love you Grandpa, you will be missed.
his Life

History of Birth Place

Battersea Borough
Maternity Home

19-20 Bolingbroke Grove, Battersea, SW11 6EW

Medical character:

1921 - 1939

Maternity

In 1920 the Battersea Borough Council bought two large houses on the east side of Bolingbroke Grove, overlooking Wandsworth Common.  It was intended that these buildings, built as private dwellings but used during the 1910a as retreats for alcoholics, would be transformed into a maternity home, which the Borough lacked.

The houses - Westwood Tower at No. 19 and Elmhurst at No. 20 - were purchased, adapted and equipped at a cost of £18,851.  The two buildings were united by a communicating corridor at the semi-basement level.

The Battersea Borough Maternity Home opened on 21st February 1921 (the official opening ceremony took place on 5th March).  It was one of the first municipal maternity hospitals to open.

As well as 30 beds for in-patients (excluding cots, labour beds and isolation beds), the Maternity Home had an Out-Patients Department with a well-equipped Ante-Natal Centre.

In No. 19 (Westwood Tower) the ground floor contained a Waiting Room, two wards, a Receiving Room (where the patient was bathed and prepared before being taken to the Labour Ward), a Labour Ward, and a Night and Day Nursery.  There were also a pantry, two storerooms and a WC with wash basin.

On the first floor were 3 more wards, a Labour Ward, an Isolation Ward, a Duty Room, as well as a washroom and WC, a bathroom and a Sluice Room.  On the second floor were six rooms, a bathroom and WC, and a tank room.  There was also a room at roof level in the tower.

Five beds and a Labour Ward were set aside for women with venereal disease.

The semi-basement of No. 19 was used as an Out-Patients Department, with a Waiting Room, a Nurses' Room, Doctors' Room and Matron's Room.  It also contained the Maids' Dining Room, a Linen Room, a Dirty Linen Room and a storeroom, as well as the stoker's room, a coal store, a heating chamber (furnace) and two WCs (one with a washbasin).  (Another WC with washing facilities was added later.)  The semi-basement of No. 20 contained the kitchen, scullery and larder, together with the Nurses' Dining Room, a Lecture Room, a WC and a heating chamber.

The ground floor of No. 20 (Elmhurst) contained two wards, a bathroom, and the Doctor's Sitting Room.  There were six rooms on the first floor - the Nurses' Sitting Room, the Doctor's bedroom, Matron's bedroom and sitting room, and two further bedrooms.  Between the ground and first floor was a bathroom and WC.  Five staff bedrooms and a bathroom and a WC with washbasin were located on the second floor.

A rota of local medical practitioners, who were available for attendance, could be called upon by Matron, if necessary.

At the end of 1921 a District Midwifery Service was established.  The District midwife and her pupil were located in the 
Town Hall in Lavender Hill - a central situation so that she could more rapidly be accessible to those needing her services.  The Midwife's rooms were connect by telephone to the Maternity Home, and patients needing her services at night could phone from a police station.

In 1922 the Maternity Home became a recognised training institution for pupil-midwives.

In 1929 an extension was built at a cost of £4,182.

At the end of 1935, when the Maternity Home had been open for 14 years, some 7,587 babies had been born there.

In 1936 the nursing staff consisted of a Matron, a Sister and 4 Staff Nurses, and a Borough Midwife who provided the District Service.  The average number of beds occupied during the year was 17 (60%).  However, shortage of staff resulted in the Maternity Home having to close temporarily for ten weeks.

Because of the small staff and consequent lack of social amenities, the Maternity Home was unable to compete with the larger London hospitals to attract staff, in a period when there was a general shortage of nurses.  By 1938 the Maternity Home had become seriously understaffed, with 3 vacancies for Staff Nurses.  As nurses resigned, it had proved impossible to replace them, despite repeated advertisements, and it was necessary to employ nurses from private associations.  The new regulations of the Central Midwives' Board added to the difficulties, since the number of pupil-midwives had to be reduced from 8 to 6.

The Borough Council considered the situation.  The buildings were over 60-70 years old and needed considerable repair.  Cracks had been appearing in both buildings for some years, with movement of the foundations at the southeast corner of Elmhurst.  The south and east walls had begun to bulge.  A large crack in the wall of Ward 4 on the ground floor of Westward Tower had appeared suddenly at night, and had been heard by the patients on the ward.

Reluctant to pay for the expense of underpinning of the houses and, in view of the availability of other maternity accommodation in London, the Council felt it had no alternative but to close the Maternity Home and terminate the District Midwifery Service.

No patients were admitted after 31st January 1939, and the last one was discharged on 9th February.

During its 18-year existence, some 8,842 mothers had been confined within (about 21% of Battersea births), with only 10 maternal deaths.

Present status (June 2012)

The buildings suffered bomb blast damage during WW2 (1939-1945) and were demolished around 1948.  The grounds of an apartment block - Lane Court - now occupy the site.

The Maternity Home would have been between Thurleigh Road and Blenkarne Road along Bolingbroke Grove.  Its site is now part of the grounds of Lane Court (above and below).

References (Accessed 3rd July 2018)

Campbell JM 1921 
Maternity homes.  Lancet 198 (5107), 162-164.

Macdonald G 1935 
Report on the Health of the Metropolitan Borough of Battersea.  London, Battersea Borough Council, 4.

Macdonald G 1938 
Report on the Health of the Metropolitan Borough of Battersea.  London, Battersea Borough Council, 3, 128-133.

Quin Lennane G 1920  
Report on the Health of the Metropolitan Borough of Battersea.  London, Battersea Borough Council, 21.

Quin Lennane G 1922 
Report on the Health of the Metropolitan Borough of Battersea.  London, Battersea Borough Council, 26-30.

www.ucl.ac.uk (1)
www.ucl.ac.uk (2)

Michael Green was born on 18th November, 1932, in Highgate, north London, to Sonny (Edward Montague) and Stella Green, née Hodge. Michael had an older brother, John, who sadly passed away in his 30s in 1968. John's wife Teresa and their children, Anne-Marie and Rose remained very close family.
He got a scholarship to attend the Jesuit grammar school St Ignatius College in Tottenham and often spoke about how much the Jesuit ethos formed him and meant a lot to him. He went on to train as an engineer. He enjoyed classics and languages and loved France. He got a job in Paris in the late 1950s and met Josette Serra there. They married on 2nd September 1961, just 3 months after his close friend Arthur married Jenny, who came back from their honeymoon in Spain to attend the wedding. Michael and Josette also spent their honeymoon in Spain, where they took a long tour of the coast and visited Josette's family. It didn't take long for the children to come, and they had four daughters, Michèle, Caroline, Natalie and Katherine. They were married for nearly 60 years.
The family home was in Woodham, Surrey, where they lived from 1970 until 2006. The doors were always open to guests and dad provided a generous and frequent pick-up service to relatives arriving at Heathrow and Gatwick airport. Many a good party was had in Red Tiles. The time came to move, and they lived for ten years in Weymouth before moving nearer to their daughter Kathy and family, to Street, Somerset on 1st April 2016.
They have six grandchildren, Ciaran, Emma, Laoise, Ralph, Giles and Emilia.
Michael's father Sonny was one of 16 children and so he has many uncles, aunts and cousins, all over the world. Family was very important to Michael, and he loved welcoming family at his home.
Recent stories

Laoise's eulogy

Shared by Caroline Green on June 2, 2021
Granddad, I miss you. I have missed you since December 2019, just before the pandemic reshaped our interactions from visits to remote phone calls. You were an undeniably strong man, born into Britain just before the Second World War, and you left us in a global pandemic. Your stories and life lessons from eighty-eight years on this earth have taught me morals and insights I will carry with me for the rest of my life. I will carry you with me for the rest of my life. We are connected through family ties, we share our struggles, memories, world views, emotions, thoughts, and the very DNA we are comprised of, each passed down generation to generation. Above all, we are connected by our humanity, and its inherent beauty and imperfection. Knowing you, and losing you has made me reflect on my life, and how I want to live each day I am given on this earth. I want to live in honour and loving memory of you, your strength and dignity exemplified by your battles with cancer.  It broke my heart to know that you were suffering each day for so long, It broke my heart when I could not visit you one last time due to covid hospital regulations, it broke my heart when I realised I could not attend your funeral, and it breaks my heart to know that I will not be able to make new memories with you, but I will cherish the ones I have for the rest of my days. I will miss your wisdom, wit and intelligence, your strong sense of morality, and your love for the good things in life: French wine, good food, restaurants- especially a nice ‘ol fish and chips, often scampi if I remember correctly. I will miss your prolonged hello and goodbye hugs each time I visited. I will miss your smile that crept up from one side when you were amused. I will miss you calling me “little, or not-so-little one”. I will miss your stories that painted vivid pictures of the war, your life as a young man in the 50s and 60s, your adventures as an engineer, and life as a father. I will miss our weekly phone calls where, despite all of the pain you were in, I still was able to hear the sound of your voice, your sense of humour, even your advice on love and relationships. You were still you right until the end. This is how I will remember you granddad, thank you for everything. 

Life is long and short all at the same time, and I hope to do good things with mine. I hope to exemplify the same strength, loyalty, dignity, morality, and intelligence as you did. I know that wherever life takes me, you will always live on in my memories, my heart, and the parts of me that you have shaped and inspired. I hope that in your passing you are relieved of all the pain you carried with you, so that you can now rest in peace.  I love you, I miss you, and I will miss having you around for as long as I live. 

Love, 

Your Irish granddaughter, Laoise.

Dorio and Sheila Melfi

Shared by Julian Melfi on June 1, 2021
Although Michael and I were cousins, it was not until I was about sixteen that we became good friends. Most weeks I used to be invited by Aunt Stella to spend the weekends with them in Highgate. Michael and I used to belong to his local Church youth group where we spent many happy Saturday evenings. it was through these club evenings and dances that we both met Derek Kirner with whom I am still friends. Michael and I always kept in touch with each other even after we were married and I always looked forward to meeting at family gatherings and catching up with all the family news. Michael was a "one off", always happy and joking, he used to laugh and say he was the only male within the family - even the dog was a bitch!! lol... i don't know how he coped!!Until we meet up again, Sheila and I both send you our love.
God Bless, from Sheila and Dorio

From Arthur and Jenny

Shared by Natalie Green on May 25, 2021
I have very many memories of time spent together with Michael during our childhood and teen years. 
Michael was a very keen cricketer and we shared many matches together at school and later.
He organised a trip for four of us from St Ignatius College to Paris when we were in our early teens and it was my first visit abroad. We stayed in a hostel connected, I think, with the then famous Abbé Pierre and Emmaus.
St Joseph’s had a very good youth club and Michael was a leading light there every Sunday evening.
He will stay in our hearts and minds. 
Arthur and Jenny