ForeverMissed
Family and Friends of Naomi,

Although we can't be together in person right now, we've created this memorial site as a way to grieve Naomi and celebrate her life.

Naomi loved a good party, and she loved telling stories.  If you knew Naomi, help us celebrate her by clicking the Stories tab and sharing your favorite memory or anecdote, scrolling down to add a tribute here, or adding pictures and videos to the gallery. Feel free to write something short, long, funny, serious, nostalgic, or whatever you are moved to share. 
If you know someone who would like to do the same, please let them know about this page.



Posted by Susan Quick on April 7, 2021
I met Naomi at Mohonk in the early 1990's. It was my pleasure to have her friendship and to see her at many dance opportunities in the following years
at Pawling and other wonderful balls.
Naomi showed many the joys of Scottish dancing and was always so glad to help someone to become a better dancer and to love the patterns and the music. The programs at Mohonk were such a nice combination of dance, music and culture for everyone. Dance on, Naomi, we will miss you very much.
Posted by Liz Burns on April 6, 2021
Okay, I remember Naomi for a number of reasons .
I remember the frustration when I missed out on winning the lovely dancer shirts that she would raffle off at the Pawling Weekend workshop for a number of years.( And believe me I tried..) Finally, for my 40th birthday, she took pity and gave me one which I still wear today and get many compliments and comments on. The most interesting comment, made by a non- dancer by the way , was why did the male dancer have only one leg ? That was something that I had not thought on, as I knew it was hidden behind the ladies dress. I also think of Naomi when doing my own stitchery projects because I have to make sure that the back of my work looks nearly as neat as the front. Many years ago at Loch Leven practice, I had a project that I was working on and the first thing she did was flip it over to check the reverse side. I am sure many of you remember the shirts but I posted a couple of views of mine in the gallery..
Posted by Wendy Katt on April 5, 2021
In addition to being an all around mensch, Naomi was my role model for aging gracefully. I am always refuting the patients I work with who say they are "too old" to enjoy ....(name the activity) by referencing her joi de vivre and active participation in whatever she wanted to do.
Posted by Rosalind Ilett on April 4, 2021
I always enjoyed going to Naomi's for Loch Leven practice. She made us all so welcome and we had fun while she held us to a high standard which was satisfying. And she would do generous things such as embroidering shoe bags with our names or making a dish for the only vegetarian. She will be greatly missed.
Posted by Ricardo Soriano on April 4, 2021
No more suffering for you, young lady, now it's time to enjoy the fruit of your love and kindness, only at a much higher level and for much longer. It was a privilege having met Naomi, I will forever treasure the good memories of our meeting, phone conversations and all the positive and uplifting comments I heard from Rosana over the years!
Posted by Debbie Moran on April 4, 2021
In 1993, Naomi introduced me not only to the joy of Scottish dancing but also to a community of wonderful people. I looked forward to Wednesday nights seeing everyone's smiling face and that amazing tea time! Naomi even had us dance at her house in the summer. She put some much time into us and I knew she loved what she was doing. What a blessing! She is dancing with the angels now.
Posted by Moishe Mark on April 3, 2021
 At this moment we mourn a great loss. Yet her great legacy, who she was, shines through.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Susan Quick on April 7, 2021
I met Naomi at Mohonk in the early 1990's. It was my pleasure to have her friendship and to see her at many dance opportunities in the following years
at Pawling and other wonderful balls.
Naomi showed many the joys of Scottish dancing and was always so glad to help someone to become a better dancer and to love the patterns and the music. The programs at Mohonk were such a nice combination of dance, music and culture for everyone. Dance on, Naomi, we will miss you very much.
Posted by Liz Burns on April 6, 2021
Okay, I remember Naomi for a number of reasons .
I remember the frustration when I missed out on winning the lovely dancer shirts that she would raffle off at the Pawling Weekend workshop for a number of years.( And believe me I tried..) Finally, for my 40th birthday, she took pity and gave me one which I still wear today and get many compliments and comments on. The most interesting comment, made by a non- dancer by the way , was why did the male dancer have only one leg ? That was something that I had not thought on, as I knew it was hidden behind the ladies dress. I also think of Naomi when doing my own stitchery projects because I have to make sure that the back of my work looks nearly as neat as the front. Many years ago at Loch Leven practice, I had a project that I was working on and the first thing she did was flip it over to check the reverse side. I am sure many of you remember the shirts but I posted a couple of views of mine in the gallery..
Posted by Wendy Katt on April 5, 2021
In addition to being an all around mensch, Naomi was my role model for aging gracefully. I am always refuting the patients I work with who say they are "too old" to enjoy ....(name the activity) by referencing her joi de vivre and active participation in whatever she wanted to do.
her Life

NAOMI MARK LASHER (1927 - 2021)


Naomi Lasher, a longtime resident of Briarcliff Manor, NY, died peacefully at home on Friday, April 2nd at the age of 93.  She will be missed by her children, Deborah, Rebecca and Mark, their spouses, her 6 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren and many friends.  Born December 27, 1927 in Riga, Latvia to Beila and Mendel Mark, she immigrated with her parents and her beloved sister, Mika, to Toronto in 1938.  The journey from Riga to Canada included a tense train stop in Berlin the day before Kristallnacht.  This was followed by a "grand tour" of western Europe, on the insistence of her mother, so she and her sister could be exposed to art and culture.  They endured a long boat ride full of seasickness that caused a lifelong hatred of vanilla ice cream.  

In 1945, after becoming British subjects, the family immigrated to New York City to join extended family members. She became a US citizen in 1950 and a life-long Yankees fan.  She graduated from Hunter College and later got her BFA from Cornell University, where she met and married Gordon Lasher on January 2, 1953 after a brief six-week courtship.  They were married until his death in 2010.  Their honeymoon cross-country journey to California included a stop at the Grand Canyon, where Gordon discovered Naomi's intense acrophobia.  California was where Naomi had her first child, and she and Mika quickly started traditions of gathering at Passover and summer beach houses, that created strong family bonds with their children and grandchildren.  

Naomi loved dancing, especially Scottish Country Dancing, and was director of the Loch Leven performing dance troupe for many years.  She was also a Yiddish teacher and translator, founder, principal, and teacher for many years of the Children's Jewish Education Group of Westchester County.  Family vacations for many years included a week at Nova Scotia Dance Camp where so many special friendships were started at the after parties in Gordon and Naomi's room.  She used her artistic skills to decorate dance halls, illustrate Haggadahs, and embroider shirts, pictures, tablecloths, baby blankets, and gifts that she gave away generously.  The Dance Hall she added to her home was the center of many dance rehearsals, seders, celebrations, and family parties.  Nothing pleased her more than filling the house with family and friends, which provided an audience for her to tell irreverent jokes, dancers for her to boss, and mouths for her to feed.  We will all remember those good times for many years to come. 

Recent stories

Thanksgiving weekends at the Lasher’s

Shared by Alison Pepper on April 18, 2021
While I’ve been a family friend for many years and close with Deb and Tom, Dan and Hannah, my connection with Naomi was primarily attending the annual Thanksgiving  Saturday night potlucks and dances for decades. 
These events were a must attend annual ritual so that no matter where I had spent the holidays, I always made sure that I was back by Saturday night for the gathering of family and friends. Great fun evenings with Naomi’s unique touch. She will be missed!

Tante Naomi

Shared by Jamie Irvine on April 10, 2021
For most people, “great aunt” probably means a distant relative, maybe someone only seen in a family tree. In my family, and especially with my great aunt, the title meant “matriarch”. After my bobe died, Naomi took in the whole family, making her home the home for our annual sedar and becoming my surrogate bobe, for what I’m now realizing has been the majority of my life.

Naomi was our larger-than-life leader, the center of the festivities and traditions that have defined my understanding of Judaism and family. I’m going to miss her animated stories, her infectious laughter, and her vibrant energy, which somehow, even in her 90s, seemed like it would never end. I feel very proud and lucky to have had Tante Naomi in my life and I’m going to miss her a lot

Epitaph by Merrit Malloy

Shared by Ron Weston on April 9, 2021

This beautiful poem reflects so much of what Josepha and I have always felt about Naomi, and what she might want to say if she were still with us.

 When I die,
Give what’s left of me away
To children
And old me [to those] that wait to die.
 
And if you need to cry,
Cry for your brother
Walking the street beside you.
And when you need me,
Put your arms around anyone
And give them what you need to give to me.
 
I want to leave you something,
Something better than words or sounds.
 
Look for me in the people I’ve known or loved,
And if you cannot give me away,
At least let me live on in your eyes
And not your mind.
 
You can love me most
By letting hands touch hands,
By letting bodies touch bodies,
And by letting go of children
That need to be free.
 
Love doesn’t die, people do.
So, when all that’s left of me
Is love, give me away.