ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Prince Charles Adegboyega Mosunmade Akanbi Shadeko. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Bode Shadeko on March 2, 2021
My Swimmer

I feel so grateful to have had you as a father. I remember growing up was so interesting that anytime you came to pick us from school, you never came empty handed. There were always some goodies for us (sons), and you always had a smile on when handing them over. I can remember the packs of Wall’s ice cream, Nasco wafers (I so much loved the banana flavour and Daddy knew and so he handed it over to me immediately out of the mix, leaving the strawberry and vanilla flavours to my brothers, Bode and Kolade, who both aren’t particular about the flavours. They just enjoyed it. But I loved the banana flavour and Daddy always went the extra length to get it for me.
There was also Suntop, Okin shortcake biscuit, Smarties, or he would just walk into NTA, which borders our school, A.D.R.A.O International School and get some steaming hot suya sticks.
Oh Daddy! Thank you for the treats. Every occasion was special because Daddy ensured they were. Christmas and Easter would see us at the Amusement Park at Apapa and later to Kingsways, Marina to have the train ride to see Father Christmas. Afterwards, we would visit Leventis stores and shop. He so knew how to spoil us even after our mom had just reported to him of a misdeed by one or all of us collectively, Daddy would still give us that treats regardless. It usually got Mom so mad. He teased me Baba Jonbolu (meaning paper weight because of my poor feeding habit). It was his own way of encouraging me to eat well. He was a fine gentleman and enjoyed the fine things. From his Pierre Cardin shirts, French suits to his Van Heusen shoes, my Dad was stylish. You won’t see him without his sun-glasses and he had plenty of them. Daddy loved sports, especially swimming and football and he would boast about his swimming skills, sharing details of him defeating his friends and siblings at contests from the beach front at the Federal Palace hotel to Tarwa Bay. He told us so much about his conquest at the sport and sometimes challenged us (children) to a swimming contest which we always declined for fear of losing, hence I nicknamed him, Swimmer.
Daddy was always fun to be with and he loved to celebrate you and your successes. I miss you Dad, and your grandsons will miss your ever impactful presence anytime they visited or called you.
Forever in our hearts my dear Swimmer.

Prince Olushola Mosunmade Shadeko


My Charming Prince

Prince Charles Adegboyega Shadeko was a lovely father and an awesome man. Always full of life and very interesting to engage.
My fine boy Daddy was stylish and cute with his ever-dark hair punk.
He was erudite and vast on all subject matters. Ever ready to learn. I trust my Dad, he knows what you are talking about even if you were an astronaut that lives on the moon. He knew how to make strangers feel welcomed and at home. He was best at making you put on a good smile though it seems you are about to face your worst fears, I assure you Daddy would paralyse your fears with humour instantly. As I prepared to leave the country for Canada soon after my wedding, my Daddy was already missing me and the feeling was mutual. I had told him we would chat regularly and do video calls to bridge the distance, but that didn’t do much to assuage him because Daddy wasn’t so much a techy person. He was old school. He wouldn’t even have an ATM card for fear of electronic fraud. He would always walk into First Bank banking hall with his cheque leaflets for his transactions,
But I made sure we did; we had lots of video calls with Daddy from here in Calgary, especially at birthdays, Christmas and New Year and it really made him happy. Daddy didn’t just offered, but he insisted on driving me personally to the airport to catch my flight. We chatted all the way non-stop and even continued our gist at one of the waiting lounges at departure before my flight was called. I had hoped and looked forward to a home-coming with Daddy, but sad my super Dad is gone; gone to be with the Lord, my consolation.
I love you Daddy. My wife, Sandra still can’t stop the tears and your granddaughter Zoe will miss your prayers and love. You will always have a place in our hearts.                                                     

Prince Akolade Oloyede Shadeko (Son)

My Dad, My Paddy

I am still finding it hard to speak of Daddy in past tense. It’s still shocking and overwhelming. I try not to think about the reality of his demise, maybe it is my own way of grieving. But as his burial date approached, my elder brother, Olabode, Baba O, as I fondly call him, won’t stop breathing down my neck to churn out my tribute to Dad and so here is it: ‘Daddy was kind, loving, stylish and very prudent too. He loved people and goodness; he enjoyed celebrating feats and successes achieved. He was also principled and honest to a fault. Fondly, I remember Dad always looking out for us (his boys) in every way he knew best. Daddy was my best friend and paddy.
I can’t relieve myself of all of my fond memories of and with him, so I would just let the rest be for my keeps and would keep counting my blessings alongside our memories till we meet again, my Daddy.

Prince Olakanmi Adedamola Shadeko (Son)
Posted by Olabode Shadeko on February 24, 2021
My Dotting Dad!

Everything I had thought about writing my tributes to my Dad didn’t turn out as I had imagined. First, I thought it was going to be easy, simple, and quick, but how wrong I was.

On many occasions, I had asked, encouraged, demanded, and at some point yelled at my younger ones to turn in their tributes to Dad, so we don’t miss the timeline set to have the program printed.

I never knew they were probably stuck and possibly in a troubled emotional state as to what to pen down about Daddy, as I later found myself. And since I am unaware of any standard guideline of how to write a tribute about one’s Dad, I just decided to pour out my soul in the way I can to talk about my father, teacher, mentor, adviser, and model.

Daddy was too many things in one. One minute he is commending you about how smart you are and the next he tells you how unintelligent a decision you made was. Neat, stylish, and a lover of very good things, my Dad had many names by which he called me depending on his mood or moment.

He called me Omo-Oba; Bode N Jola, Omoalabos Daddy, ‘Labo, Babajambala, etc, and they were all unique to only him calling me by these names. I miss your sweet soft voice and how I long to just hear your voice one last time before goodbye.

My Dad was knowledgeable on all subjects. Don’t ask me how because I can’t explain myself, but he was and he would debate you to win on any subject. His knowledge of a lot of things was amazing.

He spoke Awori, English, French, and Yoruba languages fluently, and encouraged me to take to learning French and Awori especially, but the dominance of the English Language at learning and studies at different levels of the academic ladder didn’t help much. Maybe, I would consider it now.

Looking back now, I guess Dad wanted me to grow up very quickly for reasons I can’t still place my fingers on.

He started engaging me in his business at age 13. Putting me through his work which I considered at the time, not my business. I would type many business letters with his type-writer; use a perforator on the edges of the papers, so I could get in ropes into them to bind together.

He would make me read his business proposals, which I sometimes couldn’t make a head out of them until much later as I advanced in age.

He laughed at my witty suggestions, his own way of telling me I didn’t make sense of the subject discussed and my punishment would be to go through the entire pages of Sketch, Daily Times, Tribune, National Concord, and Punch newspapers and pick out a minimum of 100 (hundred) new words and their meanings.

He probably didn’t know how to flog because the height of his corporal punishment dished out was to kneel and raise the hands and you could be there for hours, wow! Dad could also be very sweet. He knew how to dish out treats and was very generous at it too. My sunglasses-loving Dad was a sweet tooth. He loved ice cream, cakes, biscuits, and pancakes. 

He also enjoyed his red wine sweet too. One would be amazed at his strength and skills at a game of tennis. He enjoyed swimming too as well as football.
Daddy was very doting and got excited about the success achieved. He would sing, dance, and smile all day about the knowledge of a feat achieved.

He had a beautiful heart and I love my Dad for that and much more.            He practically led me by the hand at most things till he was sure I was safe to flap my wings and fly all by myself.

I remember after my youth service in Maiduguri, I had returned home with the hope of cooling off for a year before scouting for a job, but nope. My Dad, after few months of my lazing around, eating my mom’s food and doing nothing basically, got me into his car and drove us to Independent Communication Network Limited, a company owned by his friend, Mr. Bayo Onanuga, and told him he needed to get me engaged and that was it.

Thank you Dad for your love; for looking out for me when I never bothered or cared about a thing in the world. Thank you for your guidance and directions. Most importantly Dad, thank you for the generous prayers every morning and night. I always expected your call between 10 pm -11 pm and when it came, all you say is, ‘Labo, I just want to pray for you…’ I miss all these and more Dad, and would always cherish the times and memories.

I admire your bravery and courage even in the face of death. You wanted to stay some more with us, I know because I was with you till the very end, but God wanted you home.

So, take your rest Dad, my Lagos Prince, Omo-Oba Adegboyega Mosunmade Akanbi Shadeko.

Take your deserved rest with your Creator till we meet again, Dad.

I love you Dad! 

Prince Olabode Modadeola Shadeko (Son)

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Bode Shadeko on March 2, 2021
My Swimmer

I feel so grateful to have had you as a father. I remember growing up was so interesting that anytime you came to pick us from school, you never came empty handed. There were always some goodies for us (sons), and you always had a smile on when handing them over. I can remember the packs of Wall’s ice cream, Nasco wafers (I so much loved the banana flavour and Daddy knew and so he handed it over to me immediately out of the mix, leaving the strawberry and vanilla flavours to my brothers, Bode and Kolade, who both aren’t particular about the flavours. They just enjoyed it. But I loved the banana flavour and Daddy always went the extra length to get it for me.
There was also Suntop, Okin shortcake biscuit, Smarties, or he would just walk into NTA, which borders our school, A.D.R.A.O International School and get some steaming hot suya sticks.
Oh Daddy! Thank you for the treats. Every occasion was special because Daddy ensured they were. Christmas and Easter would see us at the Amusement Park at Apapa and later to Kingsways, Marina to have the train ride to see Father Christmas. Afterwards, we would visit Leventis stores and shop. He so knew how to spoil us even after our mom had just reported to him of a misdeed by one or all of us collectively, Daddy would still give us that treats regardless. It usually got Mom so mad. He teased me Baba Jonbolu (meaning paper weight because of my poor feeding habit). It was his own way of encouraging me to eat well. He was a fine gentleman and enjoyed the fine things. From his Pierre Cardin shirts, French suits to his Van Heusen shoes, my Dad was stylish. You won’t see him without his sun-glasses and he had plenty of them. Daddy loved sports, especially swimming and football and he would boast about his swimming skills, sharing details of him defeating his friends and siblings at contests from the beach front at the Federal Palace hotel to Tarwa Bay. He told us so much about his conquest at the sport and sometimes challenged us (children) to a swimming contest which we always declined for fear of losing, hence I nicknamed him, Swimmer.
Daddy was always fun to be with and he loved to celebrate you and your successes. I miss you Dad, and your grandsons will miss your ever impactful presence anytime they visited or called you.
Forever in our hearts my dear Swimmer.

Prince Olushola Mosunmade Shadeko


My Charming Prince

Prince Charles Adegboyega Shadeko was a lovely father and an awesome man. Always full of life and very interesting to engage.
My fine boy Daddy was stylish and cute with his ever-dark hair punk.
He was erudite and vast on all subject matters. Ever ready to learn. I trust my Dad, he knows what you are talking about even if you were an astronaut that lives on the moon. He knew how to make strangers feel welcomed and at home. He was best at making you put on a good smile though it seems you are about to face your worst fears, I assure you Daddy would paralyse your fears with humour instantly. As I prepared to leave the country for Canada soon after my wedding, my Daddy was already missing me and the feeling was mutual. I had told him we would chat regularly and do video calls to bridge the distance, but that didn’t do much to assuage him because Daddy wasn’t so much a techy person. He was old school. He wouldn’t even have an ATM card for fear of electronic fraud. He would always walk into First Bank banking hall with his cheque leaflets for his transactions,
But I made sure we did; we had lots of video calls with Daddy from here in Calgary, especially at birthdays, Christmas and New Year and it really made him happy. Daddy didn’t just offered, but he insisted on driving me personally to the airport to catch my flight. We chatted all the way non-stop and even continued our gist at one of the waiting lounges at departure before my flight was called. I had hoped and looked forward to a home-coming with Daddy, but sad my super Dad is gone; gone to be with the Lord, my consolation.
I love you Daddy. My wife, Sandra still can’t stop the tears and your granddaughter Zoe will miss your prayers and love. You will always have a place in our hearts.                                                     

Prince Akolade Oloyede Shadeko (Son)

My Dad, My Paddy

I am still finding it hard to speak of Daddy in past tense. It’s still shocking and overwhelming. I try not to think about the reality of his demise, maybe it is my own way of grieving. But as his burial date approached, my elder brother, Olabode, Baba O, as I fondly call him, won’t stop breathing down my neck to churn out my tribute to Dad and so here is it: ‘Daddy was kind, loving, stylish and very prudent too. He loved people and goodness; he enjoyed celebrating feats and successes achieved. He was also principled and honest to a fault. Fondly, I remember Dad always looking out for us (his boys) in every way he knew best. Daddy was my best friend and paddy.
I can’t relieve myself of all of my fond memories of and with him, so I would just let the rest be for my keeps and would keep counting my blessings alongside our memories till we meet again, my Daddy.

Prince Olakanmi Adedamola Shadeko (Son)
Posted by Olabode Shadeko on February 24, 2021
My Dotting Dad!

Everything I had thought about writing my tributes to my Dad didn’t turn out as I had imagined. First, I thought it was going to be easy, simple, and quick, but how wrong I was.

On many occasions, I had asked, encouraged, demanded, and at some point yelled at my younger ones to turn in their tributes to Dad, so we don’t miss the timeline set to have the program printed.

I never knew they were probably stuck and possibly in a troubled emotional state as to what to pen down about Daddy, as I later found myself. And since I am unaware of any standard guideline of how to write a tribute about one’s Dad, I just decided to pour out my soul in the way I can to talk about my father, teacher, mentor, adviser, and model.

Daddy was too many things in one. One minute he is commending you about how smart you are and the next he tells you how unintelligent a decision you made was. Neat, stylish, and a lover of very good things, my Dad had many names by which he called me depending on his mood or moment.

He called me Omo-Oba; Bode N Jola, Omoalabos Daddy, ‘Labo, Babajambala, etc, and they were all unique to only him calling me by these names. I miss your sweet soft voice and how I long to just hear your voice one last time before goodbye.

My Dad was knowledgeable on all subjects. Don’t ask me how because I can’t explain myself, but he was and he would debate you to win on any subject. His knowledge of a lot of things was amazing.

He spoke Awori, English, French, and Yoruba languages fluently, and encouraged me to take to learning French and Awori especially, but the dominance of the English Language at learning and studies at different levels of the academic ladder didn’t help much. Maybe, I would consider it now.

Looking back now, I guess Dad wanted me to grow up very quickly for reasons I can’t still place my fingers on.

He started engaging me in his business at age 13. Putting me through his work which I considered at the time, not my business. I would type many business letters with his type-writer; use a perforator on the edges of the papers, so I could get in ropes into them to bind together.

He would make me read his business proposals, which I sometimes couldn’t make a head out of them until much later as I advanced in age.

He laughed at my witty suggestions, his own way of telling me I didn’t make sense of the subject discussed and my punishment would be to go through the entire pages of Sketch, Daily Times, Tribune, National Concord, and Punch newspapers and pick out a minimum of 100 (hundred) new words and their meanings.

He probably didn’t know how to flog because the height of his corporal punishment dished out was to kneel and raise the hands and you could be there for hours, wow! Dad could also be very sweet. He knew how to dish out treats and was very generous at it too. My sunglasses-loving Dad was a sweet tooth. He loved ice cream, cakes, biscuits, and pancakes. 

He also enjoyed his red wine sweet too. One would be amazed at his strength and skills at a game of tennis. He enjoyed swimming too as well as football.
Daddy was very doting and got excited about the success achieved. He would sing, dance, and smile all day about the knowledge of a feat achieved.

He had a beautiful heart and I love my Dad for that and much more.            He practically led me by the hand at most things till he was sure I was safe to flap my wings and fly all by myself.

I remember after my youth service in Maiduguri, I had returned home with the hope of cooling off for a year before scouting for a job, but nope. My Dad, after few months of my lazing around, eating my mom’s food and doing nothing basically, got me into his car and drove us to Independent Communication Network Limited, a company owned by his friend, Mr. Bayo Onanuga, and told him he needed to get me engaged and that was it.

Thank you Dad for your love; for looking out for me when I never bothered or cared about a thing in the world. Thank you for your guidance and directions. Most importantly Dad, thank you for the generous prayers every morning and night. I always expected your call between 10 pm -11 pm and when it came, all you say is, ‘Labo, I just want to pray for you…’ I miss all these and more Dad, and would always cherish the times and memories.

I admire your bravery and courage even in the face of death. You wanted to stay some more with us, I know because I was with you till the very end, but God wanted you home.

So, take your rest Dad, my Lagos Prince, Omo-Oba Adegboyega Mosunmade Akanbi Shadeko.

Take your deserved rest with your Creator till we meet again, Dad.

I love you Dad! 

Prince Olabode Modadeola Shadeko (Son)
his Life

BIOGRAPHY

Born Prince Charles Adegboyega Mosunmade Akanbi Shadeko on 17th July 1950 in Ebute-Metta area of Lagos to Prince Olamijuwonlo Ademijuwonlo Henryson Shadeko of the Ilumo Obanikoro chieftaincy royal house of Lagos and Princess Hariet Akonke Shadeko (nee Seton), the young Adegboyega attended St. Jude’s primary school, Ebute-Meta before proceeding to Mayflower School, Ikenne, Ogun State for his secondary education. He later left for the United Kingdom, where he studied Accounting at Cardiff University.

On his return to the country, Prince Adegboyega, the grandson of Prince Herbert Akindele Shadeko, and great-grandson of Prince Ibrahim Onikoro of the Akinsemoyin ruling house of Lagos was engaged at CFAO/SCOA Motors as an Accountant. 

He was, however, still fresh on the job when he lost his father, Prince Olamijuwonlo Shadeko on May 31, 1973, who was until his death the Obanikoro-elect of Lagos. 

The sudden demise of his father was very destabilizing; a huge blow he had to deal with. He, however, pulled through that challenging period he usually described as his darkest moment. 

He continued working at CFAO/SCOA Motors, where he spent 12 years and rose to the position of Chief Accountant.

In 1983, on the invitation of his father’s very close friend, the late Chief S.B. Bakare, Prince Adegboyega joined Steve Doren company, a shipping firm in Lagos, as General Manager.

Earlier before then sometimes in 1977, the Obanikoro Prince had during his many car sale prospecting visits to PZ Cussons came in contact with the pretty Margaret Olukemi Shadeko (nee Onifade), a management trainee at the company, and decided not only to woo her into a relationship but got her to marry him on 5th April 1979.

According to him, that was the juiciest deal he sealed as a car salesman and accountant. The marriage produced four (4) kids – Princes Olabode, Olushola, Akolade, and Olakanmi.  

The Isale-Eko-born Prince loved everything about his heritage, especially the food. He loved and enjoyed the seafood churned out fresh right from the very bottom of Lagos Island seas. 

From the salted fried fish (eja yoyo) to the crayfish, prawns, and crabs, he could not have enough of them. And for the snacks, he relished his chin-chin, pelebe, gurundi, kokoro, and coconut flakes (pan-fried).,

An ardent lover of sports, Prince Adegboyega loved tennis, football, swimming, and horse-racing. He played his tennis at the famous Yoruba Tennis Club on weekdays on Lagos Island and followed his football games at weekends.

A loyal supporter of Leeds United many years back, and till his death a dire hard fan of Arsenal football club.

He was a good Christian and a member of the Methodist Church of Nigeria. 

He attended the Hoare’s Memorial Methodist Cathedral Church, Yaba regularly with his family. 

Kind, gentle-natured with an amazing sense of humour, Prince Adegboyega, the second child in a family of five (5), left Steven Doren company in 1985 to join BFN finance company at an executive management level.

There he was until 1987 when he became a transporter/marketer with National Oil and Chemical Marketing Plc now Conoil.

With 16 diesel owned-trucks of 10,000 and 33,000 liters capacity for the distribution and supply of such petroleum products as - petrol, diesel, kerosene, and base oil, Prince Adegboyega saw to the smooth and effective transportation of these petroleum products around the country and received several awards and accolades from the marketing company.

He had an indulgence as a young man and that was his penchant for cars. He had car brands like Volkswagen, Peugeot, Datsun, Volvo, Subaru and Mercedes-Benz lined his garage and whenever his wife harassed him about his spend on these automobiles, he would argue that he needed a car with acceptable license plate for everyday of the week to work around the then government policy of odd/even numbers regulation of vehicular movement on particular days of the week.    

In 2006, Prince Adegboyega retired from active business enterprise and decided to enroll at the Word of Faith Bible Institute, a ministry/leadership training arm of the Living Faith Church otherwise known as Winner’s Chapel.

He participated in both the institute’s Leadership Certificate Course (LCC) and the Leadership Diploma Course to deepen his knowledge of the bible and faith.

A loving family man, he enjoyed spending time conversing topical issues with his boys; most times for the purpose of debate and keeping abreast with happenings in the country and abroad.

He always dreamt and wanted his retirement to be laced with just having cups of tea (lipton) in the mornings; follow news story in his favorite newspaper, The Punch; listen to Radio Lagos 107.5 fm Tiwa Tiwa Amititi in the morning while enjoying his cup of tea and engage with the world much after with al Jazeera, his preferred international news channel, but the accountant in him didn’t afford him much of that luxury, as his love for the accounting and by extension, auditing professions saw him inducted into the Institute of Cooperative Professionals of Nigeria and the Lagos State Cooperative Federation, a body he served as President till is death.                                                                                                              

A man of style and finesse, and not one to be outshone in matters of romance as he certainly knew how and where to get his flower bouquet, perfumes, necklaces and bracelets to serenade his wife with on special occasions such as birthdays, wedding anniversaries, Valentine’s Day, etc.

Prince Charles Adegboyega Mosunmade Shadeko took ill and was rushed to the Federal Medical Centre, Ebute-Meta on 17th January, 2021. 

He breath his last and bade the world good-bye on 19th January, 2021.

He is survived by wife, children, grandchildren, brothers, sisters, nephews, nieces and in-laws.



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My Precious Egbon Charly

Shared by Ogugua Iwelu on February 25, 2021
Let me use this opportunity to thank you for your love, guidance and mentorship to me growing up as a friend to Kiddy and neighborhood lad @ 1. Kadiri Street, Fadeyi, Lago. You’ll always be remembered and Regarded. Ogugua