A light, Professor Amandianeze, dims... but his embers continue to glow.
  • 71 years old
  • Born on October 30, 1946 in Nrii, Anaocha LGA, Anambra State, Nigeria.
  • Passed away on August 29, 2018 in Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Professor Amandianeze Obi-Okoye, Ocho-Udo-Nri,  72 years old , born on October 30, 1946 and passed away on August 29, 2018. We remember you fondly.

=======================================================================

Funeral activities will hold on Friday 23rd November 2018, at Uruofolo Village, Nri, Anaocha LGA, Anambra State, from 9.30am

The funeral service will be preceded by a brief stop-over at the Nri Town hall, Eke-Nri, as the body is received by the Executives of the Nri Progress Union (NPU) in honour of Amandi's service as a President-General of the same body, and lying-in-state at the funeral service arena.

=======================================================================

Refreshments will follow the funeral service and condolence visits immediately after internment. 

=======================================================================

In honour of the wishes of the departed, the family requests that the following be observed:

No group dancers; No gunshots (or nsi egbe); No wreaths.

=======================================================================

Condolence visits will continue on Saturday 24th November 2018, from 12 noon, at the same venue.

=======================================================================

Fundraing site - https://myrespects.com/memorial/fundraiser/felix-a...

Posted by Daniel Ifeanacho on 17th October 2018
A calm, self assured mein is what meets the eye on first contact with Professor Amandianeze Felix Obiokoye. Among his peers, he stands out like a " Colossus " his contemporaries pay obeisance to him for his uncommon guts. And generally I agreed that a "Chronicle" of the " Great Nri of Aniocha in Anmbra State can not be completed without recognizing the grave contributions of Professor Amandianeze Felix Obi-Okoye because if there were no stories behind headlines, great people will not make news. Such news becomes historic when it is written about people with wisdom knowledge and understanding in achievements made in their chosen fields. History, they say replete with stories of people who literally shaped their own world, great personalities who influenced society in various ways . One of such rare gem in Nigeria is Professor Amandianeze Felix Obi-Okoye. HE IS GONE! HE IS GONE!! How would we speak your name in years to come? I believe you will be known as " Philosopher! A warrior! Preacher of good & Vendor of good ! A man who gave Nri & Obi-Okoye her true face . Oh God give us men like this! Men of honour! Men of sages! Men with strong faith Men with great mind Men who can turn shame to fame, shame to shade Men who can stand Before a demagogue Men like Professor Amandianeze Felix Obiokoye! Hilary Zig Ziglar! John Wesley! Lelarnd Foster Wood! Ralp Waldo Emerson! Baltasar Gralian .... Not men with Professions and little Deeds! Mingle in selfish strife, Lo! Freedom weeps! Wrong rules the land and Waiting justice sleep! Farewell Papa!! From l Daniel (Billy Ocean)Unilever Kenya
Posted by Ijeoma Okedo-Alex Nee Obi... on 12th October 2018
Words fail me describe the great man that you were. Dad was a man of peace, standing always for the truth and against oppression. He was a rallying point for so many; his peers, the old and young all looked up to him. If ever a spokesperson, arbiter or middle man was needed for 'mission impossibles' at the family, umunna, community ,work and other levels then he was surely the man to look for. He fought for justice and the cause of others with so much impartiality. Many times we had guests who had come to appreciate him for resolving conflicts, paying school fees, securing opportunities and the like. He believed that a Christian should be known by good works.His oratory prowess, articulation and record keeping skills were second to none. Dad, you taught us your children hard work, diligence and focus. You laid the good academic foundation which we enjoy today. Dad, we would miss you but we rejoice that you left a lasting legacy and have gone to be with the Lord free from the cares of this world. Rest on!
Posted by Bernard Ofuani on 1st October 2018
Thank God for a life so fullfilled. This i say because of the legacy of Righteous choices i see the children take, this could only have been because of the kind of tree they are extracted from. Rest prof.
Posted by Austin Obi-Okoye on 30th September 2018
To understand my dad you have to start with one simple premise, he was not meant to exist. Since he did he was going to matter! His father died in his early teens. Before that he had lost several brothers and sisters to sickle cell. Of the five siblings that survived he was the second of five. In a culture where families don’t survive without a patriarch he did and thrived as did his siblings. He left elementary school after his father’s death to farm some of the family lands, so it would not be stolen from his widowed mother. As a result, he could not attend high/secondary school. When his siblings where older and he in his early twenties he started to pursue his dream of becoming a teacher. He wanted to be a teacher because he saw poverty as a lack of educational resources and, a lack of finance. He took his GCE A-levals, passed and without ever going to high/secondary school was admitted into college. He went on from there to earn a commonwealth scholarship for a PhD in English and Literature. My dad retired as a professor of English and Literature. Most of his life was dedicated to helping others. He saw his increasing influence as a way to serve his community. So many great memories of my dad! Some I appreciated more as an adult than I did as a kid. I remember getting a homework paper that I had forgotten about until it was due the next day while in Manning, Western Australia. My dad offered to help as I expected after he finished telling me how to approach the paper. He then asked me when it was due. I told him tomorrow knowing he’d help. My dad was a doctoral candidate and he loved to teach and write. He told me to leave the homework for me and give it to me in the morning. Sure enough the next morning my dad delivered; three pages of well written article and an outline. Only problem was it was clear that a fourteen-year-old could not have written that. It wasn’t accidental. He wrote to show me it was possible and provided the outline so I could follow it and write my own but he was sure not going to let me copy his work. I remember asking my dad why he worked so hard to help so many people, especially in the education arena. He told the story of this wealthy man from my home town. The man had an elementary school education and still managed to become a wealthy businessman, so he didn’t see the need for his kids to get an education beyond elementary school. What did my dad do? He would trick the man into financing one project or another and he combined it with his money to put the man’s kids into secondary and tertiary education. My dad was for all; fought for education, peace amongst brothers, peace in our communities, truth and accountability. He sometimes admitted to me and close friends when he got something wrong but always believed that you forgive a lot to get a lot. He was not a true politician, but he knew the art of compromise (for the greater good) without damaging one’s character. At one point during his sixties my dad had three professorial jobs in two states, just an abundance of energy and reluctant to let obstacles move him. He and my mom met during the civil war and she knew immediately he was a rising star. At his death, even with so many accomplishments he is still a rising star! My dad mattered to his wife, my mom. My dad mattered to his kids, in-laws and grand kids. My dad mattered to his brothers and sisters, nieces and nephews. My dad mattered to his Nri community. My dad mattered to his Igbo and Nigerian communities. My dad matters across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans where he learnt and taught. My dad matters in education. My dad matters in history. My dad’s legacy matters through us and all who have been touched and will be touched by his sacrifices. Lessons from Dad • Probably the most important lesson I learnt from Dad is tomorrow is not given, it is promised that if you apply yourself it will be bright. • Truth and character are worthy legacies • Christ at the start, Christ in the middle and Christ at the end, Jesus Christ always • Forgive much to gain everything • Being a man means doing whatever it takes for those that depend on you • What you allow will touch your life, what you don’t will not even touch you but it might shake the ground around you • Cherish what you have, but don’t be complacent about it • Time is valuable, use and master it • Honor • Integrity • Don’t wallow on a loss
Posted by Daniel Nwafor on 11th September 2018
What other legacy can a man leave, that will be better than raising a generation of individuals that would keep making the world a better place. Daddy, we didn't know you in your active years, but we could tell the kind of person you were based on the good work of your off-springs, who goes about in the world showcasing the good deeds they learnt from you. The facts of your good deed on earth speaks for itself through the people you left behind. May God Almighty grant you rest forever in his Bosom. Jee Nke Oma Onye Nkuzi. ___Barr. & Barr. (Mrs.) Uche and Maureen Nwafor.
Posted by Chinedum Obi-Okoye on 5th September 2018
My dad was a jolly good fellow who loved to contribute to make good things happen; Prof had a large heart and got into many fights to make positive change. He loved a good laugh and didn't shy from lending a helping hand. From a youth, he was a light to his community and a shinning example of a progressive. Prof worked hard to excel and was an inspiration to many; no doubt he continues to inspire. He mixed early with people much older than himself, no wonder then he was ahead of his peers! Prof grew up a teacher and remained a teacher at heart all his days. He loved the arts and culture and grew to be acquainted with the culture of Christ, in Whom he now rests. indeed, a light dims...

Leave a Tribute