ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Radhagobinda Maiti , who was born on September 1, 1932 and who passed away on January 8, 2019. We will remember him forever.

To know more about his life, please see the "Life" section.

Here is a small sample of his many writings (in Bengali, free to download):
1) Village Magazines
2) Rose 
Posted by Sudipta Maiti on January 8, 2020
Today marks one year of passing of a man whose life was marked by four beautifully intertwined threads: Knowledge, Ability, Kindness and Joy.
Posted by Sourav Bhunia on January 13, 2019
I came to know Professor R.G. Maiti not as the well-respected professor or the active scientist in his field that he was, but as the father of my friend. There too, he left a deep impression on my teen-age mind. At an age where we generally maintained a distance from the adults, kaku had the unique quality of approaching the youngsters with a disarming smile and engaging in conversations on topics that usually burden young minds but often dismissed by adults. It was a treat to see and listen to him engage my friends in discussion on Gita, Rabindrasangeet, evolution and topics farther afield. To the young, insecure minds, eager to gain credence in an adult world, this was priceless reassurance and affirmation. As I grew up, I even engaged in more contentious debates with kaku, so much so that once I came back to apologize. To my relief, he didn't even remember the incident, or may be pretended not to. That was kaku. Kaku would probably have been the first one to say that we have one life and that we should live it well. Kaku exemplified that in his life. We are poorer for not having him among us anymore, but at the same time we should consider ourselves fortunate to have come in his contact at all. May kakima, Susmita-di and her family, Sudipta and his family, other members of Kaku's extended family and friends find some solace in the memories of a full life well-lived. Please accept our condolences.
Posted by Goutam Bhattacharyya on January 13, 2019
Miss you, Kaku.
Posted by Shruti Bhattacharya on January 12, 2019
Today I want to share some very personal memory of Prof. Radhagobinda Maiti here. I usually donot share much of my personal memories but for Prof. Maiti my heart tells me to speak about him.
To me I always knew him as Maiti Jethu since my childhood. According to my thakurma (grandmother) and baba (father) he was like my fathers older brother, thats why I call him ‘Jethu’.
My early memories about him was mostly in ‘cha- er- adda’ (evening gathering with tea) with thakurma (grandmother) and dadu (grandfather) on Saturday and Sundays.
Apart from all funfilled childhood memories the most prominent thing that I remember about him was during the time when my baba was posted in North Bengal and ma and I was in Kalyani home. As a growing teen at that time I was just learning to maneuver the world in my own way, but Maiti Jethu never forgot to knock the door and ask ’sab thik ache to?’ He was so kind that he not only ask about me but also my pet ‘Kuttush’ (a german shepherd)..’are you taking him to vet timely?’ He taught me many small details about gardening and taking care of plants. During my morning walk with kuttush sometimes he will join me and ask’how is your school is everything fine there?’ He was always very polite and caring person to any human being.
Today when I write about him my mind goes back to Kalyani and the words donot stop. But I will stop here and only say one thing that a bunch of flower looks much beautiful than a single flower in a vase.
To me he was that kind of person whose kindness and gratefulness towards the society is like a bunch of flower which me and my family will remember forever.
Posted by Sudipta Maiti on January 10, 2019
Thank you for visiting this page created in memory of Prof. R. G. Maiti. If you would like to leave a condolence message on this website, please send it by email to sudipta.maiti@gmail.com
Please use "condolence message" as the subject heading, and give your full name, phone number, and how you knew him at the end of the message. Thank you.
Namita Maiti (wife), Susmita Ghosh (daughter), Sudipta Maiti (son), Arupratan Ghosh (son in law), Dipanwita Maiti (daughter-in-law) and other family members

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Sudipta Maiti on January 8, 2020
Today marks one year of passing of a man whose life was marked by four beautifully intertwined threads: Knowledge, Ability, Kindness and Joy.
Posted by Sourav Bhunia on January 13, 2019
I came to know Professor R.G. Maiti not as the well-respected professor or the active scientist in his field that he was, but as the father of my friend. There too, he left a deep impression on my teen-age mind. At an age where we generally maintained a distance from the adults, kaku had the unique quality of approaching the youngsters with a disarming smile and engaging in conversations on topics that usually burden young minds but often dismissed by adults. It was a treat to see and listen to him engage my friends in discussion on Gita, Rabindrasangeet, evolution and topics farther afield. To the young, insecure minds, eager to gain credence in an adult world, this was priceless reassurance and affirmation. As I grew up, I even engaged in more contentious debates with kaku, so much so that once I came back to apologize. To my relief, he didn't even remember the incident, or may be pretended not to. That was kaku. Kaku would probably have been the first one to say that we have one life and that we should live it well. Kaku exemplified that in his life. We are poorer for not having him among us anymore, but at the same time we should consider ourselves fortunate to have come in his contact at all. May kakima, Susmita-di and her family, Sudipta and his family, other members of Kaku's extended family and friends find some solace in the memories of a full life well-lived. Please accept our condolences.
Posted by Goutam Bhattacharyya on January 13, 2019
Miss you, Kaku.
his Life

A life lived for farmers and for family

Radha Gobinda Maiti was born to Manindra Nath Maiti and Basanti Debi in Rambhadrapur, a remote village in (then undivided) Medinipur, West Bengal, India. Theirs was a poor farming family. Between the floods of the Keleghai river and the occasional drought, bountiful years were few and far between. Manindranath had built a mud hut next to his brother's. His brother had a school education, something of a rarity in those parts at that time.  Radha Gobinda's unusual interest and aptitude in learning, one suspects, was nurtured by this uncle of his. 

Life was not easy for young Radha Gobinda, but it had its charm. It was lived amongst lush green fields, with ponds large and small surrounding the house, a stable with a couple of cows, and a large tamarind tree in the backyard. Why hard-working farmers should remain poor in such land of plenty would become the central question of his adult life. 

He was the eldest of three brothers, with Ananta and Prashanta following him. It was obvious from his childhood that he was by far the most academically gifted, not only in his family, but in the whole village. Children older than him, in the upper classes, used to come to him with their math problems, which he had an uncanny knack for solving. He would go on to become the first college graduate from Rambhadrapur, then the first Master's degree holder, the first Ph.D. and the first Professor at a university. He maintained a "first class" throughout, which was possibly a tad tougher seven decades ago than it is now. 

However, you would not know about his accolades even if you interacted with him for years. He of course knew that he was likely the smartest person in  any room that he was in, but he never felt the need to prove it. On the other hand, one would easily discover from even a casual conversation with him that he was brimming with ideas about how to improve the lot of the farmers in our country. 

Radha Gobinda studied Agriculture in the RBS College of Agra University in Bichpuri, UP (with a scholarship, the only way he could afford it), and finally obtained a Ph.D. from there. He did not study agriculture to get a job, he studied it with the ferocity of a person who must find solutions to burning problems which would let his kith and kin survive. He applied his knowledge and experience directly to the field. He viewed the academic publishing industry with a certain disdain, because he knew that most published research had no concern for the farmers on the field and no power to improve their lot.  He found it sad that too often a village farmer would fail to get an answer to his specific questions from the community of agricultural scientists.

Farmers sought Prof. Maiti out with a vengeance. They used to meet him in the village meetings and in the farm fairs. Many of them made a trip to Kalyani to meet him. Kalyani was where he lived most his adult life as a professor in the Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya. Every week, dozens of letters from the farmers used to arrive by post. He always made time to answer each of them individually, and in detail, till in his seventies when he became incapacitated with Parkinson's disease.  He was a copious contributor to  magazines meant for the farmers (such as Sobuj Sona, Nabanna Bharati and many others) and also for the common folks in newspapers (such as Bartaman, The Statesman and Ananda Bajaar Patrika). He was a popular figure in farm-centric talk shows on the radio and on the television. He also wrote several insightful books on farming. His prose was lucid, often witty, and  always shone with his deep knowledge on the subjects that he wrote about. 

He sincerely believed that horticulture is the right way for the farmers, especially in West Bengal, to earn enough for their labour. He introduced and developed many varieties of plants and vegetables in the plains of Bengal to facilitate economically rewarding agriculture. If you have ever admired a colourful stick of gladiolus in these parts of the country, you should probably be thankful to him for that. Scores of farmers, especially in the Kolaghat area and in the Hooghly and Nadia districts would be thankful to him for inspiring them to start the cultivation of flowers and garden plants, which ultimately transformed their lives. 

 He was a perfectionist, but was tolerant of faults in others. This was the most apparent in his dealings with his students, whom he considered to be a part of his family. It is quite unbelievable that many of his students from half a century ago  regularly visited him till his last day. Generations of students revered him to be a titan of the university.

He was a gentle human being who loved to chat, loved music, loved cooking, loved gardening, and most of all loved his family. He married Namita Biswas (a history graduate from a lawyer family in Krishnanagar) and they had two children: daughter Susmita, and son Sudipta. He raised his children in a free but supportive environment where they were never explicitly asked to study and were hardly ever punished for anything. However, he just had a gentle expectation that they would do well in school, and that they would be rational, honest and fair to others in life. It was hard for the children not to strive to meet these expectations of their doting father.  

In many ways, he symbolized the generation who grew up around the time the nation gained independence.  We are now nearing the 75th year of the independence, but we  need people of his kind today just as much as we did at the dawn of our nation.  

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