ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Richard Carter, 89 years old, born on August 4, 1932, and passed away on September 26, 2021. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Vic toria Neyedli on October 20, 2021
Somehow his years at King Ed High School were missed, but his presence wasn't! So many of us remember him fondly. We loved his Socials class and that he was so active in the sports scene. I laughed at the photo of him in his tweed jacket! I remember it! And the photo at the 3 Minute Mile was iconic. He went to Sentinel High when I went to West Van High for Grade 13 so I would always hear of him from a distance. He was a great guy! I truly enjoyed all the photos, thank you.
Posted by Henry Carter on October 16, 2021
Grandpa was special to me. He was a role model. I Cherished every moment with him, from our weekly calls to "buffet-style brunches" with ham and cheese sandwiches to sitting on the patio chatting. He accomplished so much and changed many lives, my only wish is that I can get a chance to be as great as he was.
I love you gramps, Fly high.
Posted by MaryLynn Hyndman on October 14, 2021
Jim was a wonderful and true step-father to my children, Jolyon and Allison Matheson for many years--a close relationship which endured until his death. They were both so grateful to have seen and spent time with him in his last days. He will be missed.
Posted by Len Corben on October 14, 2021
Paula and family: So very sorry to read of Jim's passing. His contributions to the basketball, educational, historical, artistic and political communities in B.C. were outstanding but it was as a friend that he truly shined. 
Posted by Trevor Lautens on October 12, 2021
I much regret Jim's passing - he was B.C. deputy minister of education when I was, for a few years while I was on parole from the newspaper business and imitating a word-adviser of sorts for the government - and I can testify that the words in other tributes like gentleman, kind, positive, friendly are not just rhetorical flourishes. When I moved into a dusty unused office Jim warmly and unaffectedly lent a hand in moving desk, chairs etc. into the space, and continued to be supportive in all ways. After retirement he and a knot of good ol' boys were a genial fixture around a table in front of Starbuck's at Caulfeild shopping centre in West Vancouver, and allowed me to interrupt briefly while he and I discussed the passing fortunes of the New York Yankees. It's one of the sustaining wonders of life that such small episodes are happiness-generating and unforgettable out of all proportion to their size. I greatly liked him. I add my sympathy to that of many others for Jim's family and count myself among those touched by his personality, interests and accomplishments.
Posted by Brian Smith on October 12, 2021
Jim served as education deputy when I was minister (1980-82) He kept me out of trouble,charmed the educational constituents, and steered a steady ship. He went on to have a splendid career in public service leadership. We continued a personal friendship through his later career with the Commonwealth games and his years in Victoria. In later years we golfed annually in Palm Springs and lunched in West Van. His career as an artist was also impressive. He was a man of many talents and loyalty was his signature.
Posted by Joan Arlington on October 11, 2021
I remember cousin Jim fondly. He was thoughtful and kind. He was almost 20 years older but our family's lived close by and he often had enthusiastic conversations with my mom. I used to babysit Heather and Stephanie prior to John being born. We had the Dunbar, Kerrisdale and Bowen Island connections with wonderful family memories. I will miss his yearly Christmas cards xxx Sending along our sympathy to the family. 
So long Jim xxx
Posted by Christman Lee on October 10, 2021
I first met Jim at King Edward High School in 1961 while I attended Grade 9. I then moved to the new Eric Hamber Secondary School the following year. Jim was my Social Studies teacher. I tried out for the senior basketball team but was cut. Many years later, I graduated from UBC with a teaching degree and was a Teacher on Call in North Delta when Low and behold, Jim Carter shows up and asks me if I want a teaching job at West Van Sec. ? I jumped at the gracious offering and taught there for 2 years. This experience led me to a future teaching opportunity in the Delta School District where I taught for 32 years. Jim Carter gave me an opportunity that I will forever be grateful. I saw Jim throughout the years and we often talk about our times together at WV. He was always a gentleman and will be missed dearly. I will never forget what Jim Carter did for me and my family. RIP Jim.
Posted by Edith Lenzen on October 9, 2021
I am so saddened by the passing of Jim. Jim was know to me at Gleneagles Weight Room for at least the last 10 years. He was one of the first friendly and welcoming faces I met when I started going there and he continued to be the heart of the Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday early morning group, "The Old Regulars". It is hard to believe I will not see his smiling face, hear his welcoming greeting and enjoy the easy conversation. It will never be the same without Gentleman Jim.  Edie
Posted by Stephanie Carter on October 8, 2021
On the afternoon of September 26, 2021, Jim Carter passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family.

Jim was known as a true gentleman. His commitment to community, family and friends was a true measure of his character. Loyal and kind, Jim was a people person. His positive and encouraging enthusiasm for life was both infectious and inspiring.

Athlete, educator, civil servant, businessman, historian and artist, Jim was a leader with creative ideas and the ability to make them happen. Born in 1932 in Vancouver, Jim spent his childhood in Dunbar with his parents Dick and Katie Carter, his brother Ross and many friends.

Jim loved basketball and sports of any kind. He played with the UBC Thunderbirds and on occasion against the Harlem Globetrotters. In 1958, his senior men’s basketball team won the Canadian championship. Jim continued his passion and went on to coach high school basketball in Vancouver.

While attending UBC, Jim worked as a surveyor during the summers in remote areas of Northern British Columbia. As a 22-year-old student in 1954, Jim took $10 to a camp poker game and within a few hours he had won $420 - enough to quit his job and purchase tickets to the Empire Games in Vancouver. On Aug 7th, 1954 from Row 29, Seat 25 Jim witnessed John Landy’s famous glance over his left shoulder only to be passed by Roger Bannister on the right who shortly thereafter became the first person to run a mile in under four minutes. The memory of the crowd erupting remained vivid in Jim’s memory and the story often shared over the years.

Beginning his teaching career at King Edward High School in 1955, Jim went on to be vice-principal at Point Grey and then principal at Sentinel and West Van Secondary. His love of West Vancouver had begun during cherished boyhood summers in Fisherman’s Cove and would continue throughout his life. Bowen Island was a special place to Jim with many memories of happy times at the family cabin. His enjoyment of Bowen spanned from his teen years into his 80s.

In 1980, Jim became the Deputy Minister of Education in Victoria and then the Deputy Minister of Social Service. He left the government in 1988 to establish Canadian Pacific College International for Japanese college students. During this time, he chaired the BC Gaming Commission and the Duke of Edinburgh Awards.

Jim’s background in sports, leadership and politics led to his appointment as Chair of Sport for the Victoria Commonwealth Games in 1994. While at the Games, Jim met Roger Bannister and John Landy. With Jim’s Empire Games program from 1954 in hand, Roger and John graciously signed their names in the one and two positions respectively, marking a special moment for all three men. His games committee was inducted into the Victoria Sport Hall of Fame in 2014. Jim was a board member and chair of Sport BC and a founding member of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic bid committee.

After retiring, Jim was active in the West Vancouver community. As President of the West Vancouver Historical Society, he published several books including Cottages to Community, and a book on the history of BC Ferries. In addition to loving books and reading, he discovered a passion for art and spent many Wednesday’s painting with his art group at West Vancouver Yacht Club. Jim was a regular fixture at a number of coffee shops in West Van where he met his ‘buds’ to ‘solve the problems of the world’ most days of the week.

Jim enjoyed many trips and adventures with his wife Paula. Hawaii, Australia and Europe were among their favourite destinations. A recent family birthday getaway led Jim to Gabriola Island in August for his 89th birthday celebration.

He will be greatly missed by his wife Paula, his three children Heather (Jim), Stephanie (Fraser), John (Teresa), stepchildren Greg (Polly), Gary (Debbie), Brent (Cindy), Allison (Andrew), Joel and his grandchildren Isabella, Henry, Ilya, Carson, Brian, Cam, Matt, Ryan, Jamie and Jordan.

A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Visit www.forevermissed.com/richard-james-carter/about
to view Jim’s memorial website. In lieu of flowers, donations to KidSport BC would be appreciated.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Vic toria Neyedli on October 20, 2021
Somehow his years at King Ed High School were missed, but his presence wasn't! So many of us remember him fondly. We loved his Socials class and that he was so active in the sports scene. I laughed at the photo of him in his tweed jacket! I remember it! And the photo at the 3 Minute Mile was iconic. He went to Sentinel High when I went to West Van High for Grade 13 so I would always hear of him from a distance. He was a great guy! I truly enjoyed all the photos, thank you.
Posted by Henry Carter on October 16, 2021
Grandpa was special to me. He was a role model. I Cherished every moment with him, from our weekly calls to "buffet-style brunches" with ham and cheese sandwiches to sitting on the patio chatting. He accomplished so much and changed many lives, my only wish is that I can get a chance to be as great as he was.
I love you gramps, Fly high.
Posted by MaryLynn Hyndman on October 14, 2021
Jim was a wonderful and true step-father to my children, Jolyon and Allison Matheson for many years--a close relationship which endured until his death. They were both so grateful to have seen and spent time with him in his last days. He will be missed.
his Life

Jim’s Life

On the afternoon of September 26, 2021, Jim Carter passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family. 

Jim was known as a true gentleman. His commitment to community, family and friends was a true measure of his character. Loyal and kind, Jim was a people person. His positive and encouraging enthusiasm for life was both infectious and inspiring.

Athlete, educator, civil servant, businessman, historian and artist, Jim was a leader with creative ideas and the ability to make them happen. Born in 1932 in Vancouver, Jim spent his childhood in Dunbar with his parents Dick and Katie Carter, his brother Ross and many friends. 

Jim loved basketball and sports of any kind. He played with the UBC Thunderbirds and on occasion against the Harlem Globetrotters. In 1958, his senior men’s basketball team won the Canadian championship. Jim continued his passion and went on to coach high school basketball in Vancouver.

While attending UBC, Jim worked as a surveyor during the summers in remote areas of Northern British Columbia. As a 22-year-old student in 1954, Jim took $10 to a camp poker game and within a few hours he had won $420 - enough to quit his job and purchase tickets to the Empire Games in Vancouver. On Aug 7th from Row 29, Seat 25 Jim witnessed John Landy’s famous glance over his left shoulder only to be passed by Roger Bannister on the right who shortly thereafter became the first person to run a mile in under four minutes. The memory of the crowd erupting remained vivid in Jim’s memory and the story often shared over the years.

Beginning his teaching career at King Edward High School in 1955, Jim went on to be vice-principal at Point Grey and then principal at Sentinel and West Van Secondary. 

His love of West Vancouver had begun during cherished boyhood summers in Fisherman’s Cove and would continue throughout his life. Bowen Island was a special place to Jim with many memories of happy times at the family cabin. His enjoyment of Bowen spanned from his teen years into his 80s.

In 1980, Jim became the Deputy Minister of Education in Victoria and then the Deputy Minister of Social Service. He left the government in 1988 to establish Canadian Pacific College International for Japanese college students. During this time, he chaired the BC Gaming Commission and the Duke of Edinburgh Awards.

Jim’s background in sports, leadership and politics led to his appointment as Chair of Sport for the Victoria Commonwealth Games in 1994. While at the Games, Jim met Roger Bannister and John Landy. With Jim’s Empire Games program from 1954 in hand, Roger and John graciously signed their names in the one and two positions respectively, marking a special moment for all three men. His games committee was inducted into the Victoria Sport Hall of Fame in 2014. Jim was a board member and chair of Sport BC and a founding member of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic bid committee. 

After retiring, Jim was active in the West Vancouver community. As President of the West Vancouver Historical Society, he published several books including Cottages to Community, and a book on the history of BC Ferries. In addition to loving books and reading, he discovered a passion for art and spent many Wednesday’s painting with his art group at West Vancouver Yacht Club. Jim was a regular fixture at a number of coffee shops in West Van where he met his ‘buds’ to ‘solve the problems of the world’ most days of the week. 

Jim enjoyed many trips and adventures with his wife Paula. Hawaii, Australia and Europe were among their favourite destinations. A recent family birthday getaway led Jim to Gabriola Island in August for his 89th birthday celebration.

He will be greatly missed by his wife Paula, his three children Heather (Jim), Stephanie (Fraser), John (Teresa), stepchildren Greg (Polly), Gary (Debbie), Brent (Cindy), Allison (Andrew), Joel and his grandchildren Isabella, Henry, Ilya, Carson, Brian, Cam, Matt, Ryan, Jamie and Jordan.

A celebration of life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations to KidSport BC would be appreciated

Recent stories

A Day to Remember a Lifetime

Shared by Len Corben on October 14, 2021
From the North Shore Outlook's Instant Replay column on August 6, 2009
by Len Corben

It was 55 years ago – August 7, 1954 – that the world turned its eyes on Vancouver.

That’s the day of the greatly anticipated Miracle Mile between England’s Roger Bannister and Australia’s John Landy at Empire Stadium and the most unexpected drama of English marathoner Jim Peters and his brutally agonizing attempt to finish the 26-mile, 385-yard race on hands, knees and rubber legs.

The drama wasn’t only down on the track.

Some of the more than 35,000 that packed the place that final afternoon of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games have their own incredible stories to tell of how they got to see those unforgettable events. Here is one.

Jim Carter was a 22-year-old university student working as a tower inspector between Kitimat and Kemano in the summer of 1954. He wanted desperately to see the Miracle Mile but couldn’t afford to leave his job a month early and forfeit much-needed tuition funds.

Until, that is, he hit the jackpot… and begged to be fired – or at least laid off.

Each payday, he had risked no more than $10 at the always-available blackjack games. He never won a thing.

But the Saturday before the B.E.G.’s featured mile, Carter’s luck changed dramatically.

Drawing a timely ace, he doubled his growing winnings from $190 to $380 and decided to exit the game. “I got up,” he was recalling last week, “and this bulldoze operator grabbed my shoulder, shoved me back down and said, ‘Sit down until you lose the deal, kid.’”

But Jim kept winning, ending with about $450.

Now he had enough to forego an August paycheque, though he really didn’t want to fork over the plane fare home which he’d have to do if he quit. “That would have cost me a fair bit of my ill-gotten gain,” he admits. So he pleaded to be laid off so his fare would be covered.

The boss wouldn’t go for it at first but finally relented. His pink slip confirmed, Carter was on the next plane.

However, Carter – who went on to become Principal at Sentinel and West Van high schools from 1967-75 – still didn’t have B.E.G. tickets and the final day was sold out.

That’s when he hit another jackpot.

A friend had a sister living in Texas who was unable to come to Vancouver. Carter bought her tickets, including one for the Bannister-Landy race day which ultimately also included the mesmerizing, show-stopping Peters spectacle.

Carter’s west-side seat in row 29, section C, gave him a view of the spot where Bannister’s passing of Landy was captured forever in Charlie Warner’s photo, Frank Crymble’s painting and Jack Harman’s statue at the PNE’s Hastings-Renfrew entrance.

Carter – who had stints as B.C.’s Deputy Minister of Education and then Social Services and Housing in the 1970s and ’80s – was Chairman of the Sports Committee for the 1994 Commonwealth Games in Victoria. Bannister and Landy were there as guests for the 40th anniversary of their magnificent, sub-four-minute Vancouver mile. Carter had them sign his ’54 program and the story in Sports Illustrated’s inaugural issue (pictured above).

An Educator Ahead of his Time . . .

Shared by Alex Campbell on October 9, 2021
The scene was Point Grey Secondary in the late sixties.  As the school's young VP, Mr. Carter was #2 on staff . . . but in our hearts, he was #1.  Mr. Carter was ahead of his time in that he valued the concepts of Student Voice and Student Agency . . . even way back then.  I too went into public education after university and often thought of Jim Carter on my own journey.  I think the V.S.B. found Jim to be too 'progressive' and when the principalship did not come, the West Van. District quickly scooped him up to serve as principal in two of their high schools.  Later in my career, I worked in the West Van. schools and by the end of the second week, I had visited both Sentinel and West Van. High.  While there, I had found his pictures on the school walls along with the grad classes.  Seeing his pictures in the principal role at both schools brought a big smile to my face.  I can only imagine the great job he would have done as well as Deputy Minister of Education in Victoria; he would have brought a joie de vivre to the entire Ministry !  W.B. Yeats once said: "Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire" - Jim would have 'lit that fire' myriad times in his esteemed career !
Alex Campbell
Point Grey Secondary School
Class of 1969