ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of Ruth. Until we gather together in person we encourage you to share a memory, add a photo or tell a story.
Posted by Franklin Miller-Small on May 30, 2021
            Ruth Has Meant So Much to Me
When I first met Ruth 35 years ago at ECRS, she quickly won me over with her kind eyes and warm smile. Soon after, I discovered we had much in common. Just like my mother, Ruth fled Vienna from Nazi terror at a young age. We also both valued left-wing politics, loved folk dancing and folk music, and identified as progressive Jews.

Early on, Ruth encouraged me to join the ECRS Board, saying “They need someone like you, and you’d be good for it.” I demurred because I didn’t feel ready for it and thought it wouldn’t be a good fit for my interests and strengths. I felt honored, though, that Ruth thought so highly of me at a time that my self-confidence was a bit shaky.

Over the years my admiration for Ruth grew, as I observed her leadership administering events and teaching classes, such as folkdance, singing, and informal dramatics. Particularly, I noticed her ability to combine competence, sensitivity and fun, and I remembered saying to myself, “That’s the kind of leader I want to be.”

Fortunately, the opportunity to become that kind of leader eventually came, and Ruth initiated it. She requested in Echoes (ECRS newsletter) that anyone wanting to teach creative writing should contact her. I jumped at the chance, remembering my dormant passion for writing, and soon called her.

For several years afterward, at various free-time slots and an eventual trial class, I offered writing experiences. All the while, Ruth gave me valuable, supportive feedback, helping me to develop the skills and confidence that led up to teaching my first four-day class at Summer School. All this preparation more than paid off when the class participants gave me rave reviews.

Bolstered by my success made possible by Ruth, I went on to teach a long string of classes for the next 15 years with topics ranging from memory and creativity to diversity and the Beatles. In addition, the personal and professional development facilitated by Ruth, allowed me to evolve from teaching young children to a more fulfilling career teaching English to immigrants at a Community College.

Given my high regard for Ruth, she became my choice for helping to celebrate my wedding. Before the event, Alex and Ruth gave Donna (my wife) and me invaluable suggestions to enhance both our ceremony and celebration. During the festivities, Ruth led our guests in spirited folk dancing which created a feeling of connection and enjoyment rarely experienced at these occasions. 

A number of years after the wedding, when ECRS faced some difficult challenges, I stepped up to co-lead (with Donna) a major reform project known as the Future Planning Committee. Ruth rejoiced when she learned of my new position, reminding me that she always wanted me to take on a leadership role in ECRS, and now if finally happened! With enthusiasm, she joined the committee, and we worked side-by-side for several years to design an exciting new plan for change.

As Ruth aged, I was glad to visit her several times at a Westchester assisted living facility, glad to have written and performed a tribute song at one of her milestone occasions, and glad to have written a letter of appreciation several weeks before her passing. 

Although I’ll miss her dearly, I’ll always remember how much Ruth meant to me. I’ll remember how she enabled me to realize my potential because she believed in me and supported my striving toward growth. I’ll remember her wise, compassionate and joyful leadership, presenting me with a role-model toward which I continue to aspire. And, perhaps most of all, I’ll remember a very special human being whose friendship I was fortunate to have. 
Posted by Judy Salpeter on May 24, 2021
What an amazing woman Ruth was! She had this way of making everybody feel special. She was my aunt's friend, my friend's mom, and so much more than that to me. I can't think of another non-relative of her generation with whom I felt such an instant kinship. She was a great listener, a warm and joyful person, and I loved our long-into-the night conversations at Nova Scotia dance camp and beyond. David and Ed, I'm so glad that you all had time together at the end. I know how happy she was whenever she was with you and how proud she was of both of you -- a great son and loving son-in-law! Sending big hugs to the whole family.
Posted by Jill Greenstein on May 21, 2021
I had the honor to know Ruth for many, many years. We were both school psychologists and met through a support group that started as a professional group and quickly turned to a personal support group. We shared sadness joys, loves and wonderful times. Ruth was a beautiful person.  I will always remember her smile, her humor, her talent and her kindness. My life was enriched because of knowing Ruth. 
Posted by Alison Pepper on May 19, 2021
Forty years ago, I had the good fortune to be invited to attend an ECRS weekend and met Ruth and Alex. As we shared life experiences, Ruth shared that David was also a graduate of Bank Street College and we met at Winter workshop that December. Thus began a deep friendship with our extended friends and families, many celebratory parties and ECRS events. Knowing Ruth enriched my life through her joy of life, dance, family, friends and travel. I will miss her friendship and love.
Posted by Connie and Jerry Shulman on May 16, 2021
Ruth was a beautiful human being. She nurtured everyone who was lucky enough to be in her presence. She always made us feel like we were very special. 

David, and Ed you were lucky to have Ruth as a role model for so many years. How wonderful that she was able to spend the last month of her life being near you.
Posted by Judy Weisman on May 12, 2021
While I never was lucky enough to meet Ruth, she certainly seems to me to have been a remarkable woman, and the extraordinary coincidence of Circle Pines left me amazed. I hope to hear more stories from you, David and Ed, as we move forward. Z'l.
Posted by Sabina McManaman on May 11, 2021
David and Ed, So sorry for your loss. 
We have been lucky to have our parents as long as we did, but we are still never ready. I am so glad that you had her in Maine for her last few months.
Ruth was a beautiful soul, and I enjoyed every minute I was lucky enough to have spent with her. So many happy, fun memories.  Take care, God Bless
Posted by Dan Rubin on May 11, 2021
Fun loving
Welcoming
Family oriented
A strong leader
Good friend
Dedicated parent
Lived life to its fullest
Will be sorely missed
Patient teacher
Posted by Mickey Reed on May 11, 2021
Such a beautiful woman. She was a real inspiration to my leadership and the epitome of human kindness. So glad for her move to Maine where she could be with you both.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Franklin Miller-Small on May 30, 2021
            Ruth Has Meant So Much to Me
When I first met Ruth 35 years ago at ECRS, she quickly won me over with her kind eyes and warm smile. Soon after, I discovered we had much in common. Just like my mother, Ruth fled Vienna from Nazi terror at a young age. We also both valued left-wing politics, loved folk dancing and folk music, and identified as progressive Jews.

Early on, Ruth encouraged me to join the ECRS Board, saying “They need someone like you, and you’d be good for it.” I demurred because I didn’t feel ready for it and thought it wouldn’t be a good fit for my interests and strengths. I felt honored, though, that Ruth thought so highly of me at a time that my self-confidence was a bit shaky.

Over the years my admiration for Ruth grew, as I observed her leadership administering events and teaching classes, such as folkdance, singing, and informal dramatics. Particularly, I noticed her ability to combine competence, sensitivity and fun, and I remembered saying to myself, “That’s the kind of leader I want to be.”

Fortunately, the opportunity to become that kind of leader eventually came, and Ruth initiated it. She requested in Echoes (ECRS newsletter) that anyone wanting to teach creative writing should contact her. I jumped at the chance, remembering my dormant passion for writing, and soon called her.

For several years afterward, at various free-time slots and an eventual trial class, I offered writing experiences. All the while, Ruth gave me valuable, supportive feedback, helping me to develop the skills and confidence that led up to teaching my first four-day class at Summer School. All this preparation more than paid off when the class participants gave me rave reviews.

Bolstered by my success made possible by Ruth, I went on to teach a long string of classes for the next 15 years with topics ranging from memory and creativity to diversity and the Beatles. In addition, the personal and professional development facilitated by Ruth, allowed me to evolve from teaching young children to a more fulfilling career teaching English to immigrants at a Community College.

Given my high regard for Ruth, she became my choice for helping to celebrate my wedding. Before the event, Alex and Ruth gave Donna (my wife) and me invaluable suggestions to enhance both our ceremony and celebration. During the festivities, Ruth led our guests in spirited folk dancing which created a feeling of connection and enjoyment rarely experienced at these occasions. 

A number of years after the wedding, when ECRS faced some difficult challenges, I stepped up to co-lead (with Donna) a major reform project known as the Future Planning Committee. Ruth rejoiced when she learned of my new position, reminding me that she always wanted me to take on a leadership role in ECRS, and now if finally happened! With enthusiasm, she joined the committee, and we worked side-by-side for several years to design an exciting new plan for change.

As Ruth aged, I was glad to visit her several times at a Westchester assisted living facility, glad to have written and performed a tribute song at one of her milestone occasions, and glad to have written a letter of appreciation several weeks before her passing. 

Although I’ll miss her dearly, I’ll always remember how much Ruth meant to me. I’ll remember how she enabled me to realize my potential because she believed in me and supported my striving toward growth. I’ll remember her wise, compassionate and joyful leadership, presenting me with a role-model toward which I continue to aspire. And, perhaps most of all, I’ll remember a very special human being whose friendship I was fortunate to have. 
Posted by Judy Salpeter on May 24, 2021
What an amazing woman Ruth was! She had this way of making everybody feel special. She was my aunt's friend, my friend's mom, and so much more than that to me. I can't think of another non-relative of her generation with whom I felt such an instant kinship. She was a great listener, a warm and joyful person, and I loved our long-into-the night conversations at Nova Scotia dance camp and beyond. David and Ed, I'm so glad that you all had time together at the end. I know how happy she was whenever she was with you and how proud she was of both of you -- a great son and loving son-in-law! Sending big hugs to the whole family.
Posted by Jill Greenstein on May 21, 2021
I had the honor to know Ruth for many, many years. We were both school psychologists and met through a support group that started as a professional group and quickly turned to a personal support group. We shared sadness joys, loves and wonderful times. Ruth was a beautiful person.  I will always remember her smile, her humor, her talent and her kindness. My life was enriched because of knowing Ruth. 
her Life

Ruth

Ruth Sherman, longtime resident of Ossining, NY, died peacefully on Friday, May 7 at the age of 92 in her new home in Portland, Maine. Ruth is deeply missed by son David, son-in-law, Ed Hurley, nephews Steve and Peter Sherman, four great nieces/nephew and extended family. She was predeceased by her husband of 62 years, Alex Sherman. 

Born June 17, 1928 in Vienna, Austria, she and her parents Erna and Walter Fisher escaped to this country in 1938 leaving all their immediate family behind. They reestablished their life in Chicago where Ruth remained through the end of college.  When she was 16, she was introduced to Alex who was stationed in Chicago while serving in the Navy. They married 6 years later and moved to Alex's hometown New York City, and a few years after to Ossining. Their son David was born in 1956. When David was old enough, Ruth went back to get a masters in school psychology and worked in the Ossining Public Schools in that field for close to 20 years before her retirement in 1987.

Ruth and Alex were avid folk dance teachers and recreation leaders, and led dance classes throughout Westchester County. They were long affiliated with the Eastern Cooperative Recreation School where she served on the staff and the Board. They enjoyed all forms of music and theater, and loved to travel; they covered the globe, especially after their retirement. She was active politically and leftist to the core, beliefs solidified early at the Circle Pines Center where she spent her summers throughout college.  Ruth loved to connect with people. She made new connections easily and kept up correspondences with friends from all periods of her life.  Staying up incredibly late at night having a heart to heart with someone was her specialty.  

Most of all, Ruth loved her family and together with Alex, maintained a large circle of devoted friends. She was a compassionate and nurturing soul with a wonderful sense of humor and a keen eye for fun. She was a true inspiration to all who were fortunate enough to know her, and remains dearly loved by all.

Recent stories

Ruth Has Meant So Much to Me

Shared by Franklin Miller-Small on May 30, 2021


When I first met Ruth 35 years ago at ECRS, she quickly won me over with her kind eyes and warm smile. Soon after, I discovered we had much in common.Just like my mother, Ruth fled Vienna from Nazi terror at a young age.We also both valued left-wing politics, loved folk dancing and folk music, and identified as progressive Jews.

Early on, Ruth encouraged me to join the ECRS Board, saying “They need someone like you, and you’d be good for it.”I demurred because I didn’t feel ready for it and thought it wouldn’t be a good fit for my interests and strengths. I felt honored, though, that Ruth thought so highly of me at a time that my self-confidence was a bit shaky.

Over the years my admiration for Ruth grew, as I observed her leadership administering events and teaching classes, such as folkdance, singing, and informal dramatics. Particularly, I noticed her ability to combine competence, sensitivity and fun, and I remembered saying to myself, “That’s the kind of leader I want to be.”

Fortunately, the opportunity to become that kind of leader eventually came, and Ruth initiated it.She requested in Echoes (ECRS newsletter) that anyone wanting to teach creative writing should contact her.I jumped at the chance, remembering my dormant passion for writing, and soon called her.

For several years afterward, at various free-time slots and an eventual trial class, I offered writing experiences.All the while, Ruth gave me valuable, supportive feedback, helping me to develop the skills and confidence that led up to teaching my first four-day class at Summer School.All this preparation more than paid off when the class participants gave me rave reviews.

Bolstered by my success made possible by Ruth, I went on to teach a long string of classes for the next 15 years with topics ranging from memory and creativity to diversity and the Beatles.In addition, the personal and professional development facilitated by Ruth, allowed me to evolve from teaching young children to a more fulfilling career teaching English to immigrants at a Community College.

Given my high regard for Ruth, she became my choice for helping to celebrate my wedding. Before the event, Alex and Ruth gave Donna (my wife) and me invaluable suggestions to enhance both our ceremony and celebration.During the festivities, Ruth led our guests in spirited folk dancing which created a feeling of connection and enjoyment rarely experienced at these occasions.

A number of years after the wedding, when ECRS faced some difficult challenges, I stepped up to co-lead (with Donna) a major reform project known as the Future Planning Committee.Ruth rejoiced when she learned of my new position, reminding me that she always wanted me to take on a leadership role in ECRS, and now if finally happened!With enthusiasm, she joined the committee, and we worked side-by-side for several years to design an exciting new plan for change.

As Ruth aged, I was glad to visit her several times at a Westchester assisted living facility, glad to have written and performed a tribute song at one of her milestone occasions, and glad to have written a letter of appreciation several weeks before her passing.



Although I’ll miss her dearly, I’ll always remember how much Ruth meant to me.I’ll remember how she enabled me to realize my potential because she believed in me and supported my striving toward growth. I’ll remember her wise, compassionate and joyful leadership, presenting me with a role-model toward which I continue to aspire. And, perhaps most of all, I’ll remember a very special human being whose friendship I was fortunate to have.

Shared by Clare Rosen on May 21, 2021
Ruth was in my life for more than 50 years, first as my school psychology mentor, then a colleague. co-groupie in a support group and as an enduring loving friend. Ruth taught me more than I can articulate. Her intelligence, worldliness, generosity and loving kindness defined her. She was a loyal friend. Her love for Alex, David and Ed was palpable. I miss you Ruth but will always hold you in my heart and memories. Forever, Clare Rose 
Shared by Martha Woods on May 12, 2021
Ruth Sherman had such an impact on my life. I am a better human for knowing her. Thank you Ruth, for all your wisdom, your songs, your dances, and your love.