ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Stan Heywood, 98 years old, born on July 17, 1922, and passed away on February 11, 2021. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Jennifer Engle on February 25, 2021
My grandfather, whom I have ever and only called Pop-pop, could be the life of the party. When he was telling a joke, his eyes would sparkle and that grin! It could charm the socks off anyone. All the good dirty jokes I ever heard up until my twenties were jokes I’d heard my Pop-pop tell.
Once, when my sister and I were kids, Pop-pop drove us from the lake to the Bay Area to see our grandma on our father’s side. It was a long drive that he made even longer – no one drives more slowly than my Pop-pop – and all the way he regaled the two of us with stories of the years he’d spent as a young man in San Francisco, the famous people he’d met, ball players especially. They all had ludicrous-sounding names to our young ears and we insisted he was making it all up. “Those people don’t exist!” we shouted at him in that old Lincoln as it heaved its way around Napa Valley curves. The stories were too fantastical, the names too impossible to be true. He was pulling our legs, and we could tell by the way his eyes sparkled, and that smile of his! He’d slap his hand on his thigh, he’d laugh and laugh. “It’s true!” he’d say. “Ask your grandmother when you get there. Ask your grandmother if she has ever heard of any of these men.”
And sure enough, she had. She knew every one of them. He’d been laughing at our incredulity all along.
Sometimes, if a summer evening was particularly breathtaking at the lake, we could convince him to take us out in the boat after dinner to look for deer. We would ride out towards the coves at dusk, and he would cut the engine, so we could wait in silence. When the deer appeared like the magical creatures they are, the look of awe and that sparkle in his eyes rivalled ours, his grandchildren. Pop-pop relished the wonder of the world as well as a child.
Other times, after we’d been skiing all morning and the sun and wind and water and waves had worn us out, he’d let us drift in the boat in a quiet spot on the lake. We could swim or rest, look around, talk in that tired, easy way we had after so much time spent together, and he would always, without fail, at some point say, “Isn’t this great? Isn’t this just great? Being up here?” He'd look up and admire a particularly graceful golden hill, recognizing it for the gift it was.
When I got older, I realized he told us those stories to express his awe and appreciation for what life had given him. Not only the lake, but his wife and his success in business too. He’d tell me, “I’d never have been as successful as I was without your grandmother. She’s the real brains around here.” By the time I knew him, he had achieved more than he'd thought possible, and that was OK in his book.
Posted by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
https://youtu.be/Qdy_lbqx3Z0

When Dad was 91, Fox News interviewed him about his being an avid cyclist.
Click the link above to view the interview and hear Dad's "take" on
life, and see him RIDE.............   Dad was truly remarkable!
Posted by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
John Stanley Heywood


With heavy hearts, the Arizona Lighting Sales Team announces the passing of our dear friend and colleague of 33 years.

In the 1950's Stan Heywood started his career in lighting working for a friend by the name of Preston Jones, or 'Pres' at a little company you may know of called PREScolite.

At the time, the notion of a lighting agency didn't exist. Mr. Heywood made his way to the east coast to promote Prescolite, and persuade his friends to do the same. He then traveled across the country and signed on the first ever lighting agencies that remain prevalent today.
During his time with Prescolite, Stan became affluent in Ventriloquism. He adopted a unique sales call with a very sophisticated side-kick named 'Tex'. Tex was a dummy that Stan purchased from London, and he brought him on every sales call while working for Prescolite. He would visit electrical engineers, and Tex and himself would launch the latest lighting from Prescolite. His routine with Tex became so popular, that they were continuously searching for larger venues because the engineers would invite their wives to see him perform. At one point, they rented out a large hotel banquet room for 500 people. 600 showed up, and the hotel didn't have enough food so they had to buy out local grocery stores of more steaks to feed the additional 100 guests.

When Prescolite was purchased by a larger company called US Industries, Stan's new role didn't mesh with his needs to be out in the world entertaining clients. It was time for a change. He traveled back to San Francisco, and opened up his own lighting agency, Lighting Systems.

At the age of 65, he and his beloved wife, Ernie sold the agency and retired to Sun Lakes, Arizona. It should be noted, that Stan was not only socially adept, he was considerably athletic. He loved water sports, biking, and golf. Stan played along-side many professional golfers, and was a scratch golfer himself. The energy he exuded was too much for retirement. Ernie knew that her good friend Andy Anderson had a lighting agency right there in Arizona. She called up Andy, and asked him to keep Stan busy.

For 33 years, Stan became known as Stan 'The Lunch Man' Heywood. He spent those years as a friend and mentor to everyone at Arizona Lighting Sales as well as the engineering community.


https://youtu.be/Qdy_lbqx3Z0

Click above for a local news story about Stan from 2014
Posted by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 20, 2021
John Stanley “Stan-the-Man” Heywood, died February 11, 2021 due to Covid
related illness - born July 17th, 1922 in Spokane, Washington to parents, Hetta Evelyn Powell and Everett Donald Heywood. Survived by brother Wayne Wesley “Skip” Heywood and sister (deceased) Rosalie Reese.   
Married Ernestine (Ernie) DeFord on January 4th, 1948 after a four-month whirlwind courtship.

Dad loved to travel - seeing the world together with Mother was one of Dad’s passions. Many times we witnessed eager young minds wanting to hear Dad’s stories of success. He was like a magnet and happy to share his secrets. Having lived through the Great Depression and serving in WWII in the merchant marines, Dad knew the true meaning of going without. Dad’s approach to life was fierce and he lived it to its fullest - water skiing, wakeboarding, bicycling, golfing (playing the pro circuit), and a little-known secret, he was ventriloquist well into his late 80"s. Dad also enjoyed a remarkable career in commercial lighting, leaving Prescolite Lighting as General Sales Manager and founding the San Francisco-based agency, Lighting Systems in 1969. Dad became an icon in the commercial lighting industry.
Dad had many passions but truly his greatest passion was Lake Berryessa - The Lake. The Lake was the place of gathering for friends and family. We lived, loved, and laughed for over 45 years there. This was Dad’s special place – Heywood’s Haven. Our father, our grandfather (Pop Pop) lived a wonderful life and we all miss him dearly, but forever grateful we had him for 98 years and forever in our hearts.

Stan is survived by wife Ernestine (Ernie) Heywood and 4 daughters, Sydney (Engle), Jacklyn (Heywood-Stanton), Standra (Meyers), and Leslie (Aramapatzis and 9 grandchildren Jennifer, Brittany, Christopher, Stanell, Kyndra, Ashley and Johnathan, and 7 great-grandchildren James, Jack, Leo, Greyson, Asher, Skyler, Caleb, Liam and Brianna.

Private family memorial service to be held.

Please join the family in remembering and sharing personal moments of Dad’s life on www.forevermissed.com/Stan-Heywood/about 
We would love to hear from anyone having a story to share about Dad.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Jennifer Engle on February 25, 2021
My grandfather, whom I have ever and only called Pop-pop, could be the life of the party. When he was telling a joke, his eyes would sparkle and that grin! It could charm the socks off anyone. All the good dirty jokes I ever heard up until my twenties were jokes I’d heard my Pop-pop tell.
Once, when my sister and I were kids, Pop-pop drove us from the lake to the Bay Area to see our grandma on our father’s side. It was a long drive that he made even longer – no one drives more slowly than my Pop-pop – and all the way he regaled the two of us with stories of the years he’d spent as a young man in San Francisco, the famous people he’d met, ball players especially. They all had ludicrous-sounding names to our young ears and we insisted he was making it all up. “Those people don’t exist!” we shouted at him in that old Lincoln as it heaved its way around Napa Valley curves. The stories were too fantastical, the names too impossible to be true. He was pulling our legs, and we could tell by the way his eyes sparkled, and that smile of his! He’d slap his hand on his thigh, he’d laugh and laugh. “It’s true!” he’d say. “Ask your grandmother when you get there. Ask your grandmother if she has ever heard of any of these men.”
And sure enough, she had. She knew every one of them. He’d been laughing at our incredulity all along.
Sometimes, if a summer evening was particularly breathtaking at the lake, we could convince him to take us out in the boat after dinner to look for deer. We would ride out towards the coves at dusk, and he would cut the engine, so we could wait in silence. When the deer appeared like the magical creatures they are, the look of awe and that sparkle in his eyes rivalled ours, his grandchildren. Pop-pop relished the wonder of the world as well as a child.
Other times, after we’d been skiing all morning and the sun and wind and water and waves had worn us out, he’d let us drift in the boat in a quiet spot on the lake. We could swim or rest, look around, talk in that tired, easy way we had after so much time spent together, and he would always, without fail, at some point say, “Isn’t this great? Isn’t this just great? Being up here?” He'd look up and admire a particularly graceful golden hill, recognizing it for the gift it was.
When I got older, I realized he told us those stories to express his awe and appreciation for what life had given him. Not only the lake, but his wife and his success in business too. He’d tell me, “I’d never have been as successful as I was without your grandmother. She’s the real brains around here.” By the time I knew him, he had achieved more than he'd thought possible, and that was OK in his book.
Posted by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
https://youtu.be/Qdy_lbqx3Z0

When Dad was 91, Fox News interviewed him about his being an avid cyclist.
Click the link above to view the interview and hear Dad's "take" on
life, and see him RIDE.............   Dad was truly remarkable!
Posted by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
John Stanley Heywood


With heavy hearts, the Arizona Lighting Sales Team announces the passing of our dear friend and colleague of 33 years.

In the 1950's Stan Heywood started his career in lighting working for a friend by the name of Preston Jones, or 'Pres' at a little company you may know of called PREScolite.

At the time, the notion of a lighting agency didn't exist. Mr. Heywood made his way to the east coast to promote Prescolite, and persuade his friends to do the same. He then traveled across the country and signed on the first ever lighting agencies that remain prevalent today.
During his time with Prescolite, Stan became affluent in Ventriloquism. He adopted a unique sales call with a very sophisticated side-kick named 'Tex'. Tex was a dummy that Stan purchased from London, and he brought him on every sales call while working for Prescolite. He would visit electrical engineers, and Tex and himself would launch the latest lighting from Prescolite. His routine with Tex became so popular, that they were continuously searching for larger venues because the engineers would invite their wives to see him perform. At one point, they rented out a large hotel banquet room for 500 people. 600 showed up, and the hotel didn't have enough food so they had to buy out local grocery stores of more steaks to feed the additional 100 guests.

When Prescolite was purchased by a larger company called US Industries, Stan's new role didn't mesh with his needs to be out in the world entertaining clients. It was time for a change. He traveled back to San Francisco, and opened up his own lighting agency, Lighting Systems.

At the age of 65, he and his beloved wife, Ernie sold the agency and retired to Sun Lakes, Arizona. It should be noted, that Stan was not only socially adept, he was considerably athletic. He loved water sports, biking, and golf. Stan played along-side many professional golfers, and was a scratch golfer himself. The energy he exuded was too much for retirement. Ernie knew that her good friend Andy Anderson had a lighting agency right there in Arizona. She called up Andy, and asked him to keep Stan busy.

For 33 years, Stan became known as Stan 'The Lunch Man' Heywood. He spent those years as a friend and mentor to everyone at Arizona Lighting Sales as well as the engineering community.


https://youtu.be/Qdy_lbqx3Z0

Click above for a local news story about Stan from 2014
his Life

Lighting Systems Commercial Lighting Agency in San Francisco

Article from San Francisco Chronicle 1969
New Lighting Agency in San Francisco, California

What potentially "hot" sales area has an agency at an address of "Ice House 403"?
ANSWER: San Francisco and Northern California.  The agency's name is Lighting Systems, Inc.,
headed by J. Stanley Heywood.  M.r Heywood, who was marketing and general sales manager of Prescolite, division of U.S. Lighting Industries, joined with Lighting Associates, Inc. of San Francisco and Larry L. Routh also formerly with Prescolite to form a new agency called Lighting Systems, Inc.

Mr. Heywood became general sales manager at Prescolite after joining them in 1952 as a salesman, advancing to Eastern Sales Manager in 1956 and General Sales Manager 4 years ago.
Lighting Associates, Inc., was jointly owned by Lewis Gill, Alva E. Thompson and Anthony J. Biro. In the new organization, Al Thompson will service as secretary, Gill and Biro as vice presidents. Another member of the firm, Wayne Miller will serve as office manager and Larry Routh will serve as treasurer.

These men as a combination represent approximately 80 years of experience in the lighting industry. With this many years of experience in lighting, do you think we will hear much from their agency?   
You bet your sweet lamp we will!
Recent stories

Dad the water skier

Shared by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
Later in life, I was one of the fortunate daughters that got to spend time with Daddy and Mother up at Lake. Lake Berryessa was Daddy's favorite place in the world.  I would go up in September during what we called Indian Summer when the temperatures were still in the high 80's, the kids were all back in school, the campers had all left, only a few fishermen were out on the Lake, and we had the whole Lake to ourselves to water-ski.
During the summer months, we'd have to get up early in the morning, between 6:30 and 7 am
to race out to the narrows to get smooth water for a great ski. It would be windy and cold with fog, but Daddy insisted that we had to get the smooth water before those other skiers "messed up" the water. Indian Summer was Dad's and my favorite time as we could go out on the water at 10 am. Dad would ski first, the water smooth as glass, not a ripple anywhere. Daddy would lean the ski into the water and shoot out a gigantic "roostertail" of water......it was wonderful to see!  Dad wore a hat to protect his head and under it, you could see his huge white smile shining with enjoyment and his love for water skiing. When we were all done skiing, we'd relax and sit in the boat having a beer and Dad would say "isn't this great - aren't we lucky that we can do this Ernestine? We are blessed.... it's heaven!" Of course, Mom and I agreed with Daddy.   Love you Daddy...........

Story by Standra (Heywood) Meyers


Get the picture.........................

Shared by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
Posted by Leslie Arampatzis on February 21, 2021
Dad had two favorite sayings “get the picture “and “I don’t care what anyone says you’re OK in my book.” Get The picture could be taken two ways, but typically meant annoyance and ok in Dad's book was the best! This term was when dad was feeling playful giving us a hard time and ending with I don’t care what anyone says you’re OK in my book always followed with a wink or hug! Well dad right back at you.”I don’t care what any One says about you, Your ok in my book”!

Dad and his boat...........

Shared by Jacklyn Heywood-Stanton on February 25, 2021
Posted by Leslie Arampatzis on February 21, 2021
Daddy, loved the lake more then one could describe he loved every thing about the lake almost! He love to eat the fresh fish from the lake but was dependent on our loving neighbors to suppile such a feast! He lothed fishing.But daddy being daddy decided to take me fishing ,but not before he cut out a templet from card board of the floor of the boat the mighty Sea Ray daddys beloved boat wanted to make sure no fish scales or blood get on the carpet! ( love that positive thinking). We went out on the lake before sunrise Four hours later we gave in to defeat with out so much as a nibbel. Pulling in the line took a smug longer as we were useing Pink Ladys, has dad pulled in his Pink Lady grabbing the fishing line now with his bear hands,( Whala) a 16" rainbow hit his line and he pulled that fish in to the boat with one wave of his hand, he had caught his first fish however unconventional he was now a fisherman! We put are lines back in now that the fish were ready to jump in the boat. We came home that day with One fish and a Hell of a story.Needless to say that was the first and last time daddy took me fishing a cherish memory