ForeverMissed
Trevor was known for his brilliance, humor, and athleticism. In youth, he gained early recognition from friends and family as a prolific and expressive writer, a renown that would continue to manifest itself with time and age.

Perhaps even more than that, however, all who knew him will fondly recall his compassion for humankind, endless pursuit of knowledge, and playful energy as some of his greatest qualities.

An entrepreneurial spirit led him to many successful travels across the globe, and wherever in the world he journeyed, it was a certainty that someone there would be touched by his wisdom, empathy, and guidance.
Posted by Karlene Sinclair on September 26, 2020
I met Trevor some years ago when we both matriculated at West Indies College. We were both in the science department and I always found his quirky sense of humor to be quite refreshing. He left and I think went to Canada and we lost touch so I had not seen him in many years. I did move to the Washington DC area to do my surgery residency and I did see him again as he visited Yvette there. I was surprised and saddened at his death. Our interactions over the years were brief but always pleasant and filled with good memories. My prayers are with Yvette and his family. Just know that we are praying for you. Despite the few interactions he is still missed and will never be forgotten
Posted by Grace McCalla on September 19, 2020
I met Trevor when he came to Jamaica in the 70's to get ready for the Common Entrance exams. We lived in the same house and when he passed the exams he joined me at St. Jago. I don't pretend to be as smart as Trevor. He was always a mind ahead of everyone else. He really believed that "learning never ends" and as it was so easy for him, I believe that he was the only person who could challenge himself. I remember when he sat his GCEs in 4th form and said that he was not going to 5th form. That was Trevor. And there he was with Collette at West Indies College (NCU), tall dark chocolate walking with his usual bounce and brilliant smile. Trevor was a dreamer and those dreams could not be tamed by land, sea or circumstances. His untimely passing was quite a shock. 
On behalf of your cousins Icylin, Willpert, Rollion, Derick, Karlene and myself, members of the McCalla family, I extend sincere condolences to Trevor's wife, children, sisters, brother and mother at this time of sadness. 
Rest well Trevor. The final trip is just a morning away.
Grace Marcelyn McCalla, cousin.
Posted by YVETTE WEIR on September 18, 2020
I wish I could leave a candle burning for the light he shone on so many people over the past 58 years. This was no more telling than the people who have visited this site ( almost two thousand ) and those of you who have chosen to leave visible memories and to the hundreds of people who viewed his funeral during and after the event.

I am very grateful for all the condolences and especially prayers that have been offered ever since you have heard of his passing. Most of us Weirs in the family believe that he is resting quietly in the grave in Toronto, awaiting the breath of life again "when the trumpet shall sound and the dead in Christ shall rise again" and death's STING and graveyards will be no more.

Until then we will sorrow and grieve, but not without hope.
Much love and gratitude to those who have visited and those who for years to come will also do the same..
Posted by Trudy Holmes-Caines on September 16, 2020
So many good memories, so many lives touched, so much accomplished, yet gone much too soon. I am so sad. I extend a hug to you all Weir family. I pray with you and look forward to the time of new beginnings but no endings.
Posted by Dahlia Holmes on September 16, 2020
I grew up following Trevor around like a shadow, and he never got mad or tired of me, he always talked to me about what he was doing, and always made me feel heard when everyone else just saw a child who "should be seen and not heard." Many years later he came back to Jamaica to visit and we became more to each other for a brief moment in time. As always he made me feel valued and strong and smart. He always lifted the people around him, he always reminded you that you were more and meant for more. I can still hear him calling my mother and wrapping her in his giant hug and making her laugh, and talking in depth with my dad arguing theology and science.
We hadn't spoken for years but he always stayed in my heart.
My prayers and love go out to Aunt Louise and the rest of his family. May you rest safe in the knowledge that you will see him again.
Love always,
Michelle Holmes
Posted by Edwin Hyatt on September 16, 2020
I met Trevor when his family moved to Jamaica in the 70s and he was my neighbor for several years and also a roommate in college for a while.

I remember him playing his accordion like there was no tomorrow, with a smile on his face. We shared a lot of memories of a simpler life back then.

On behalf of the Hyatt family, our condolences go out to the Weir family in this time of sorrow. We look forward to that resurrection morning when our loved ones will again be united.
Posted by Beverley Higgins on September 16, 2020
Trevor I have never met you but you seem to have been a man of value from what is illustrated of your personality and life work. You are sincerely missed by those who have know you. Until you meet again rest in peace. My condolences to loved ones friends and family.
Posted by Daveian Morrison on September 16, 2020
I first met Trevor in 2018 when he came to Jamaica. In that short time and our conversations Trevor had given me the courage to think that its ok to think the power is within to make the impacts on the world we see that are needed, to be that agent of change to positively impact lives we wish. At the time of his passing we were to combine our efforts in bringing broadband internet access to those who in this time of digital communication needed it. I shall press on keeping Trevor in mind knowing he would want to see this go to the heights he dreamed of it. Rest well Trevor!
Posted by Kenise Henry on September 16, 2020
I met Trevor when the Weir family moved to Jamaica in the 1970's. He was the tall, dark and handsome older brother of my best friend Yvette. I remember him being super smart, talkative, funny and athletic, played volley ball a lot, and he taught Yvette and me to play "The Entertainer" on the piano (which was so cool!). I haven't seen him in many years, but it's so heart-warming to see and hear about all the wonderful things he had been doing and the positive impacts that he made on other people's lives. To his family: I pray that God will grant you all the strength that you need to get through today's memorial service, and divine comfort and peace to press on in the days ahead.
Posted by Aminata Jay on September 14, 2020
Dear T, I remembered when you told me you were just a messanger when ever I wondered what manner of man you were, at 17, I was enslaved with traditional and africanized mentality, totally blind to the modern day world, I was mentally and physically a slave to my own self. I could not even express myself neither could I write well, staying in a foreign land without a family, all my dreams were shattered, do I even have one by then? 

And then you showed up, meeting you 2017 at the vegan resto where you stayed then was the beginning of my liberation, with many youths in the room planning a hunger project (called "feed yourself when you are hungry") aiming to plant coconuts that would be used to produce oil and food, and employment for youths in our group. I sat across opposite from you, looking at this tall and brilliant guy with an accent he seemed to know everything about anything, after lamenting on my interest on computers you chose me out of many youths, you commended on how well I spoke and gave me a high five, you even grew more interest in me when you found out I was an Adventist, you told me about mzungu and many histories about Adventist Churches around the globe, you were mad when you found out there were no Adventist colleges here and the some major west African countries.


Since then you started bringing out the best in me, teaching and coaching me till I successfully escaped teenage hood you were my every support, my anchor in life's ocean you shared your knowledge which my so weak IQ could not absorb faster, but you were still patient, you never gave up on me you believed I could make it if I just focus. when you introduced coding to me, I almost cry when I could not figure it out during the first week. well, I actually thought I would never be able to, but you picked me right back up when ever I stubbled you believed these skills would make me independent of any African man that would want to enslave me and turn me into a baby making machine, I was slow at learning very slow even my own school teachers would have given up on me, but not you Trevor.

You loved me and cared so much even to the food I ate and the air that I breathe, you believed Africa is gonna slow me down you told me to do my best and get out learn and earn and reach out to other girls that might be going through the same, so I could bring food and warmth to those hungry, cold, and homeless kids back home, you always told me that you helped people because you want them to reach back to others, you always had a smile on your face and the tone of your voice always brings peace to everyone that heard you speaks.


You motivated my mom back home in Sierra Leone to get back to college.


You saved the life of my uncle that was having health issues and was at the peak of getting blind, you suggested remedies that worked in a situation where doctors have done their best, and guess what? Mom still brags about you as the best doc that ever lived.


You are my Hero today and forever, I would make sure my generations to come would know about you and all the Good works you have done.

And I promise I would do my best to get out of here as you told me to, and be that strong independent woman you wanted I would be like Joyce, Jessica, and bill that you always wanted me to work with, you're gone but you've left a legacy that I would continue in your name it would not be wiped out of Africa you would be part of our history.

The memories we had, the long writes up that you always wrote and told me "read it again Aminata" I have learnt a whole lot from you and I guess it all I needed to get myself together reach out and get to higher heights since you're not with me anymore though you promised me you would never leave me
 

I pray the that the Lord hasten thy rapture so I could see you soon, I'm 220% sure you would be with us in heaven

Sleep T till we meet again
I love you Trevor ❤️we all do
Besos





Posted by Fatima Gborie on September 14, 2020
My dear Trevor...The first time we met,u captured my attention with your priceless smile and ur sense of humor,,since that u became a friend, mentor, father figure that anyone could ever want.you thought me how to believe in myself and so much. We last spoke on Thursday the 3rd of September, we laughed crack jokes and you last words were "Fatima always take of Yousef "with a smile on ur face as always.. I pray that God grant you heaven and give enter restyour memories will forever remain in my heart till we again REST IN HEAVEN TREVOR.
Posted by Garnet Weir on September 12, 2020
It was just last Thursday September 3, that Trevor and I spoke. For about 40-45 minutes we traversed family, politics, economics etc. and there was in his voice no hint of a goodbye. He left us so suddenly. It was a shock and I am still reconciling myself to it. Truly the heart has a mind of its own and often quits without notice. Trevor had a heart and it was a good heart.

I remember the first time I took him to Mandeville. I don’t remember what year it was, but he could have been about twelve or thirteen at the time. We were in my very special 1969 VW 1200 and as I drove  I was playing a cassette. One of the pieces on it was Johann Strauss “The Blue Danube”. As it played, all his chatter stopped. He was completely captured by the waltz. We ended up discussing Austria and Germany and its twentieth century wars.
Trevor had a brilliant mind. It was an inquisitive mind. He was intellectually curious about everything. He was excited by knowledge. His interests were encyclopedic. His weakness was perhaps that there was so much to know and he was so impatient to know, he usually moved on before he dug in deep. Should you, though, ask him a question on anything, he’ll quickly give you a treatise response on it and on questions you did not ask. Trevor was a thinking man’s friend.

As he was universal in his knowledge, so was he in his sojourns and travels. A brief stint in the USA was followed by much longer stays in, between and among the cities of Toronto, London, Dubai, Bangkok, Hong Kong and Manila. In each one he was always using some branch of his entrepreneurial mind to start new businesses or work on projects. I recall his frustration in his inability to complete a working model of a kidney dialysis machine he had designed. Emailing me, he had written “here I am stuck in the toilet, everything working in base mode 95% and can't get over this small mechanical engineering hiccup” and then “It doesn't feel exciting anymore, just feeling drained by the long gestation period discussing mundane non-earth shattering topics like plastic cabling.” A cheap kidney dialysis machine was a far cry from his base discipline of information science, but that was Trevor.
Trevor was interested in the development of Africa and appears from his emails to me to have been active at separate times in both Kenyan and Gambian politics. Four years ago while he was in Gambia he wrote of his African experience, “Uncle Garnet, my body tells me that I might be home.
My mind knows a bit better, but the pull is very strong.
The work to be done is so mind-bogglingly large.
The literacy rate is skewed by significant cheating and cash.
But, some of these people speak 4-5 languages with a fair bit of fluency.
I am in awe at the flexibility of brains capable of that who are yet being hammered with messages that they are inferior.”
He enjoyed the interaction with Gambian young people, perhaps because he recognized through their intellectual capacity the potential for a generational change that could occur through education. That is why he spent the time with them, to swim, to play volley ball and to create WhatsApps groups through which to disseminate information.
Those who knew him best knew that he had a generous heart.
Now he rests and his passing leaves an aching void. The impact of his positive influence on those he nurtured will continue through eternity to justify his presence on earth. To his immediate family, loved ones and friends I offer my condolences. Let your reflections of him be such as to encourage your own positive impact on lives that need to be touched. Truly the measure of a man is what he leaves behind to make this world a better place. Trevor played his role. Rest well, Trevor.
Posted by John Ellis on September 12, 2020
Last text from Trevor he was asking advice on how to coach his girls basketball team. I was humbled that he would ask me for coaching help knowing how brilliant he was. I always saw Trevor as one of the smartest person I knew. I remember Trevor singing in the choir and playing around on the piano. There was nothing that Trevor could not do and if he couldn’t do it he was certainly going to try. I can still to this day see him jumping from the stands at Joe Louis arena onto the stage where the choir was rehearsing. His landing on the stage made such a loud thump our choir direct was not impress. I will cherish the many late nights we played basketball together with the Scarborough church boys.  Trevor is loved by our Scarborough group. He brought to us many days of laugher, joy and happiness.

To the family of Trevor we would like for you to know that Trevor is loved and cherished. We understand that the days ahead will be very trying. May you find peace in knowing that Trevor allowed his light to shine bright so that others may see the light. Wishing you strength and courage to march on in a way that Trevor seeing you would say ‘ this is my family and I am so proud’. May the Lord watch over you and grant you peace for today and the days ahead.
Posted by Gabrielle Gladstone on September 10, 2020
My uncle Trevor has always been a very eclectic and wonderful presence in the family for me. I remember struggling with my online classes and him being very quick to help and initiate a Skype call to walk me through any help I might need. He was always handy with electronics and we spoke on the phone while he tried to help me. He joked with me a lot and told me to reach out whenever I remember my Uncle Trevor to always be active, outgoing and to never care what anyone thought! He was always willing to help me and I loved the joking relationship he had with my mom (Yvette). I looked up to to the way he embraced his uniqueness and never desired to fit in. Rest. In. Peace Uncle Trevor
Posted by Maxine Gunnis on September 10, 2020
How do I find the words to describe someone who to me loved life, adventure and had a huge heart. Trevor I'm so saddened by your untimely passing and wish we could have spoken sooner. Your family will always have a special place in our hearts and I pray they find the strength with God's help to treasure each moment here now and until our Lord comes. Thank you Yvette for helping create this opportunity to leave our thoughts and pay tribute to Trevor. He was truly one of a kind abd he will be missed. God bless.
Posted by Jordan Weir on September 10, 2020
My Dad is someone I always looked up to. He took risks, blazed the path less travelled, and was never afraid to be the first one to push towards a vision only he could see.

He had no patience for nonsense, but was quick to help everyone he could. Most people care about family, then community, then country. Dad was quick to see everyone as family, and spent much of his life building ties and taking care of people across the globe.

The first two thirds of his life were characterized by frantic motion; startups, new businesses, and a constant roller coaster ride. I was glad to see in the last 5-10 years he developed a degree of balance, and maybe even contentedness.

His life was a powerful example of generosity, vision, and the strength of dreams, and it’s one I’ll respect and honour for the rest of my life.

I loved him deeply, and he will never be forgotten.

RIP Trevor Weir
Posted by Ariel Gladstone on September 10, 2020
I’ll cherish all our conversations. I haven’t seen you in almost a decade when you stopped by while we stayed at Grandma’s in Kingston but you always moved in not only a mentor figure but a very understanding one. Curious to see how I’d evolved and always anxious to pick my brain. You moved with authority but also kindness. You will be missed. -Ariel
Posted by Donna Ferguson on September 10, 2020
I don't have the words to describe the sadness I have felt since hearing about Trevor's passing. Our families have always been close since we were little and we grew up together like cousins.

Trevor was always the one to teach, mentor and help whoever he can. So many people I have spoken to recently have memories of Trevor teaching them something, helping them in some way in their lives or just being there to support them. Trevor was always the kind of person you could just go to if you need anything at all. 

I spoke with Trevor two weeks prior to his passing and we laughed about old times and talked about life in general. It had been some time since we last spoke so it was great to catch up. We discussed staying in touch which I had intended to do but who would have thought it would be the last time we would have the opportunity to speak to one another. I am grateful that I had the opportunity to speak with him but sad that I didn't get another chance.

I miss Trevor and will never forget him. I am comforted knowing that this world is not our home and the hope is that we will meet again one day in a world made new.
Posted by YVETTE WEIR on September 9, 2020
It is with loving sadness that I write the first note for Trevor. We have always written notes, essays, texts and emails to each other and he was quick and prolific with his responses.

Words cannot even begin to express the depth of the loss to family, friends and recipients of his kindness over the years.
He lived to serve and he did it best through education, finances, sports and just loving others.
Please share this memorial with those who knew him and engage in whichever way you feel he would have appreciated, so that we all can collectively remember Trevor..

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Karlene Sinclair on September 26, 2020
I met Trevor some years ago when we both matriculated at West Indies College. We were both in the science department and I always found his quirky sense of humor to be quite refreshing. He left and I think went to Canada and we lost touch so I had not seen him in many years. I did move to the Washington DC area to do my surgery residency and I did see him again as he visited Yvette there. I was surprised and saddened at his death. Our interactions over the years were brief but always pleasant and filled with good memories. My prayers are with Yvette and his family. Just know that we are praying for you. Despite the few interactions he is still missed and will never be forgotten
Posted by Grace McCalla on September 19, 2020
I met Trevor when he came to Jamaica in the 70's to get ready for the Common Entrance exams. We lived in the same house and when he passed the exams he joined me at St. Jago. I don't pretend to be as smart as Trevor. He was always a mind ahead of everyone else. He really believed that "learning never ends" and as it was so easy for him, I believe that he was the only person who could challenge himself. I remember when he sat his GCEs in 4th form and said that he was not going to 5th form. That was Trevor. And there he was with Collette at West Indies College (NCU), tall dark chocolate walking with his usual bounce and brilliant smile. Trevor was a dreamer and those dreams could not be tamed by land, sea or circumstances. His untimely passing was quite a shock. 
On behalf of your cousins Icylin, Willpert, Rollion, Derick, Karlene and myself, members of the McCalla family, I extend sincere condolences to Trevor's wife, children, sisters, brother and mother at this time of sadness. 
Rest well Trevor. The final trip is just a morning away.
Grace Marcelyn McCalla, cousin.
Posted by YVETTE WEIR on September 18, 2020
I wish I could leave a candle burning for the light he shone on so many people over the past 58 years. This was no more telling than the people who have visited this site ( almost two thousand ) and those of you who have chosen to leave visible memories and to the hundreds of people who viewed his funeral during and after the event.

I am very grateful for all the condolences and especially prayers that have been offered ever since you have heard of his passing. Most of us Weirs in the family believe that he is resting quietly in the grave in Toronto, awaiting the breath of life again "when the trumpet shall sound and the dead in Christ shall rise again" and death's STING and graveyards will be no more.

Until then we will sorrow and grieve, but not without hope.
Much love and gratitude to those who have visited and those who for years to come will also do the same..
his Life

The Toddler Years

Trevor spent his third birthday on a transatlantic cruise to Canada that would be home for the next ten years. But he almost missed that boat.

There were some brightly colored vitamins that looked exactly like the candies that our dad would bring home on a Friday and as a toddler he just helped himself to a generous dose
on Tuesday. I am not sure how he was discovered (details get lost with time and the fact that clearly I wasn't there), but my dad describes a Nottingham fog that was so thick you could barely see in front of your face.

In order to save him, my dad stepped out into the street and walked slowly behind a neighborhood bus, being guided by it's taillights.(It was not uncommon for conductors on a foggy day to walk in front of a bus to guide the bus driver). The fifteen minute walk to the hospital took them both over an hour, where his tiny tummy was pumped.
A few months later he left - safely.

He would return on his own forty years later..
Recent stories

Trevor's BIG Smile

Shared by Carl Blenman on September 12, 2020
My memories of my friend, Trevor.
I remember his big, warm, wonderful, bright smile and his amazing, intelligent mind.
There are so many stories that I could tell you about Trevor.  He sold me my first computer and he also created an inventory program for me to make my job easier.  As a matter of fact, we were the first to computerize the SDA athletic event. But the story that sticks out the most in my head is the year when we went camping. On the Friday night, we had to look for firewood in the dark forest. So let me set up the situation:
Many would recall the legend of Trevor Weir and his Celica. So we got Trevor to drive behind us in his Celica on a gravel road with the headlights pointing forward so that we could find the wood for the campfire but 5 minutes into the search for the wood, Trevor turns off his headlights and revs his engine. When he turned the headlights back on, most of us had run for our lives into the ditches. I swear, in the darkness of the night you could see Trevor's big smile and he rolled out of the car dying laughing his head off. We wanted to kill him but we couldn't because we were laughing too hard ourselves. Memories don't fade like people so we will never forget you, my friend.

An email sent one day to me...

Shared by YVETTE WEIR on September 12, 2020
You are loved Yvette and for many incredible reasons,
but it takes incredible people to sometimes appreciate
all that you are when you are so extraordinary.
Not to say that ordinary people aren't deserving of our
full love ( and maybe they aren't ). Maybe they are just
deserving of something under or at the level of what 
they are able to absorb.
We are not all created equal nor does our life
experiences necessarily tend to equal us out.

Continue being exceptional, Yvette. Appreciate who
you are and who you will be.
Appreciate also, that not all were meant to have or 
appreciate a pure 4 carat blue diamond.
Live life and enjoy each deep breath you breathe for
(despite what the young may think) 
--- tomorrow isn't promised.

Love you.



High School Graduation

Shared by YVETTE WEIR on September 12, 2020
Jasmin graduated from Bartram Trail High School in 2014, Jacksonville Florida with honors.
She was a member of the choir.