ForeverMissed

VIRGIL CHARLES COOPER, JR. 

'V.C."

SEPTEMBER 5, 1930** – JULY 1, 2021


**Virgil's birth certificate reported his birthdate as August 5, 1930. 
Posted by Bren Williams on July 22, 2021
We'll never forget you!

Posted by Barbara Miller-Collins on July 5, 2021
We did not know that Virgil would. Live only a year after the death of his last surviving siblng, Mary. Every day of life is a gift.  Vurgil's life was a testament to indomitable independence on his own terms. It was impossible to change his lifestyle until a broken hip made it so. He blamed no one for his pain. Not even the mean taxi driver who roughly pushed Vitgil out , leaving him laying in the night air with a broken hip before driving off. Rest in peace, dear uncle Virgil. I love you always. 

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Posted by Bren Williams on July 22, 2021
We'll never forget you!

Posted by Barbara Miller-Collins on July 5, 2021
We did not know that Virgil would. Live only a year after the death of his last surviving siblng, Mary. Every day of life is a gift.  Vurgil's life was a testament to indomitable independence on his own terms. It was impossible to change his lifestyle until a broken hip made it so. He blamed no one for his pain. Not even the mean taxi driver who roughly pushed Vitgil out , leaving him laying in the night air with a broken hip before driving off. Rest in peace, dear uncle Virgil. I love you always. 
his Life

Virgil Charles Cooper, Jr. was born September 5, 1930, in Canon City, Colorado.  He was the youngest of four children born to father Virgil Charles Cooper, Sr. (deceased) and mother Rosa Priscilla Hada Cooper.  Brother Albert Cooper and Marge Cooper. Brother Arthur Cooper and Isabelle Cooper.  Sister Mary Lenore Scott and William “Bill” Scott.  He was the grandson of Grandfather Warren Aldon Cooper and Grandmother Hattie Nighswonger Cooper Hoggett.   Virgil was the last living member of that “great generation” in his family. 

Virgil and his siblings lived during hard times on a dry farm surrounded by sage brush and rattlesnakes in eastern Colorado.  Their farm lay several miles from Grandfather Warren Cooper’s ranch. His mother was a hard worker and a knowledgeable farmer.  She raised chickens, grew a vegetable garden, and kept a milk cow.   His mother treated them with tender care.  

The family moved to a small home on the outskirts of Canon City, Colorado, after the dry farm failed. Virgil’s father had a bad temper and Virgil learned with his  brothers and sister to hit the screen door running to escape.  However, Virgil was the youngest child and sickly.  He was reported by his sister to be the spoiled favorite of both parents.

The Cooper family moved to Vancouver, Washington, briefly.  Then Virgil Sr. found work in the lumber mill in Yakima WA.  Junior completed the eighth grade.  He completed the Army boot camp in early 1949.  He served as a Senior Stock clerk in the Air Force followed by an honorable discharge.

Virgil spent twenty years employed by Squibb Corporation in Issaquah, Washington.  He packed prescription pills until his early retirement twenty years later. He owned a home in North Bend, Washington, where he eventually married Bonnie Ross.  She could not take the heavy rainy climate and they split up.  However, they remained good friends for the rest of Bonnie’s life.

Virgil was a third generation, life-long member in the R.L.D.S. / Community of Christ church where he served as an ordained Elder.  He liked to take care of someone.  He was gentle and kind to his nieces and nephews and was known to have talked down and calmed a sobbing niece from her perch outside his bedroom window in the old apricot tree.  Christmas cards with a dollar in them could always be expected from Uncle Virgil.  He was a friend indeed to anyone he befriended.

There was never a more devoted son to his mother.  Rosa, who lived to be 107, spent the last 14 years in a nursing home.  Virgil visited her every day and spent long hours with her.  Sundays were his day to go to church. Rosa lived a long time because of Virgil and his sister Mary’ devotion.

Virgil and Lucy Macagno formed a lasting friendship of over twenty years.  Virgil first enjoyed chauffeuring Lucy and her senior girlfriends around town. He looked out for Lucy when others took advantage. Eventually in his twilight years they roomed together for their mutual convenience.  Virgil drove his own car.  Lucy did not drive.  Virgil was deaf.  Lucy could hear well.  Together they sheltered their cats and each other.

Virgil and his sister, Mary, always looked out for each other.  Virgil and Lucy visited Mary almost every day during Mary’s three years residence in assisted living.  He took her to church on Sundays.  Life care staff and residents bit their tongues as these two argued like small children.  Virgil’s trusty car was pretty banged up before Mary was moved away to Richland.  Virgil drove that car until the day that his hip was broken.

Independent.  Loving.  Strong.  Determined.  Kind.  Charming.  Feisty.  Virgil was a faithful, good- hearted man.   His earthly journey is completed.  We say goodbye with thankful hearts.  Until we meet again in eternity, Uncle Virgil! 

Obituary author, Barbara Miller-Collins

**Virgil's birth certificate reported his birthdate as August 5, 1930. 
Recent stories

My great uncle Virgil

Shared by Nancy Alvarez on July 24, 2021
I was born later in the family so my memories of my Great Uncle Virgil are little. It was never any deep conversations but just small talk when I saw him. He was always there for family get togethers and at church every Sunday. Always loved to pick on his sister Mary (my grandma).  He was my grandma Mary’s neighbor so I practically saw him everyday, always a happy smile and a wave of hi. That lasted until grandma moved which probably puts me in my 20s. I will always remember Uncle love of twinkes and sweets. He was happy to share a mint or candy that he had in his pockets. One time he gave me I think a ketchup packet just because of his habit to give. His love for cats and leaving basically a giant bag kitty food on his step to feed them. He way independent up til he was in a nursing home. Always driving himself around and he slept on the top bunk of a bunk bed! It always amazed me that he was able to climb up there. I jokingly called him my crazy uncle because of these things. Though I love him for being who he was and I’ll never forget how thoughtful he was and he was always there for his family. May he Rest In Peace