ForeverMissed

Born to Muriel E. Watson Dooley and William E. Dooley Sr. in Chicago, Bill went on to graduate from the University of Miami.

Bill was a long time resident of Central Florida. He grew up hunting and fishing on the St. Johns River as well as the numerous surrounding lakes and woods.

Early in his professional career, Bill was involved in the development of many of the communities and neighborhoods in central Florida, designing and building their water and waste water systems.

Bill lived on the St. Johns River and made a commitment to be intimately familiar with most of the environmental issues facing the river. He even authored a children’s book about this topic. He held a Merchant Marine, 100-ton Master Captain’s License. Captian Dooley was a passionate Eco Tour boat operator who entertained his audience with his seemingly endless knowledge of the waterways history and biology along with colorful tales of the local lure.

Bill loved the Miami Hurricanes, hanging out with his many friends, and was extremely proud of his Irish heritage.

Bill was predeceased by his mother Muriel Watson Dooley. He is survived by sons, Ryan (Nicole) Dooley and Blaine (Carolann) Dooley and granddaughters, Madeline and Ashlyn, and a plethora of great friends.

Irish Blessing

May the road rise to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sunshine warm upon your face.
May the rains fall upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.

Posted by Doug Little on September 19, 2022
I met Dools shortly after my wife died when I was looking for a captain to replace my wife on our tour boat. Our mutual friend Ron put us together. One afternoon we sat on the deck of my business, and we started to talk. I had had two unsuccessful captains before that that lasted about a month each. I knew after a few minutes that it was going to work out we spent the next 4 hours talking about Wisconsin, boating, sailing flying private planes, dressage horses, failed marriages, our very different early business careers, and then owning our own businesses. We also talked about our mutual love of the river, its history, the wildlife and plants. He started the next day.
Over the more than five years we spent many hours sitting on the deck at work reminiscing about our lives, wives and businesses. Over time the business grew in both the quality and people. Our mutual point of honor is when after 3 years together we were awarded by Trip Advisor a Certificate of being one of the top 10% of all attractions worldwide. Very recently the Canadian Google Travel Committee awarded us their top Award for the quality of our tour. Dooley was delighted as was I. His goal was to obtain the designation of being one of the top 1% worldwide. Unfortunately, I became ill for the past 2 years and he took over running the business without even being asked. Last year I spent 145 days in the hospital and rehab facility and the prior year there were shorter stays but accumulated to 75 days and a lot of healing at home. I think we could have made the top one percent had I not been Ill. He always said in describing us that I was Johnny Carson, and he was Ed McMann. Being an old guy often times on tour I would loose the name of a bird, plant or animal and he would fill it in without a moments delay. We would breakup the tour into modules and only talk about the things we would see on tour. His knowledge was so varied and deep that even if I did what I knew he would add his knowledge and our guests would routinely say I have lived on the river the past 30 years and learned more today than I ever knew. WE loved what we did, and it will not be duplicated without him. One of his idiosyncratic qualities was that he had such a wide and varied vocabulary that we would sit on the deck and in casual conversation he would correct my lack correct word usage. Little things that I will miss was our almost daily telephone conversations that we would have in the evening after we had enjoyed an adult beverage or two. Bill was a man of great loyalty, responsibility to me and a man of principals. He died doing what he loved on the river on the Naiad at Highbanks Marina.
There is a 187-word poem called The Dash that I feel is fitting and I would like to share.
The Dash
I read of a man who stood to speak at a funeral of a friend. He referred to the dates on the tombstone from the beginning…to the end.
He noted that first came the date of birth and spoke of the following date with tears but said what mattered most of all was the dash between those years.
For that dash represents all the time they spent alive on earth and now only those who loved them know what that little line is worth.
For it matters not, how much we own, the cars…the house…the cash. What matters is how we lived and loved and how we spend our dash.
So, think about this long and hard; are there things you’d like to change? For you never know how much time is left that still can be rearranged.
To be less quick to anger and show appreciation more and love the people in our lives like we’ve never loved before.
If we treat each other with respect and more often wear a smile…remembering that this special dash might only last a little while.
So, when your eulogy is being read, with your life’s actions to rehash, would you be proud of the things they say about how you lived your dash?
Linda Ellis

Dooley
I’ll miss you.

Doug Little

Posted by Wayne Sargent on September 16, 2022
My wife and I met Bill (better known as Dooley) when we were weekenders at the marina. We got to know him really well when we became live-a-boards and dock neighbors in 2003 and formed a tight friendship that has lasted since. We moved from Florida in 2019 but maintained contact since. I was shocked and saddened to hear of his passing. To me, he was one of the memorable good guys that seem to leave us too soon. I will miss him.
Posted by Page Connelly on September 15, 2022
Gail & I were truly shocked to learn of Dooley’s passing. We used to spend winters living on our Carver 42CMY which we kept docked on E dock in Boat Tree Marina & the first person we met was Dooley. We had an instant connection right from the start. We shared many a happy hour on the aft deck as well as dinners together and many rides on the St John’s. We spent November through April for 4-5 years and Dooley was always the first to welcome. We stayed in touch via email & text after we sold our boat & will miss him for sure. I am proud to call Dooley my friend & May you Rest In Peace.
Posted by Chuck Schmitt on September 15, 2022
Our friend Dooley was an awesome, intelligent and fun to be around kind of guy. I always looked forward to sitting and conversing with him. He will definitely be missed, I miss our conversations already.
Posted by Robert Peters on September 15, 2022
We were so saddened to hear of Dooley's passing. We were fortunate to have met him several years ago & will always remember the frequent times spent with him at Dexter's. We always enjoyed talking with him about the places we all knew 'up north' many, many years ago.

He was a true gentleman. Rest in piece my friend.

Bob & Mary
Posted by john holiday on September 14, 2022
My Dear Dooles
              You will be deeply missed, I am saddened that I will not see you or hear your commanding voice telling fantastic stories from the past again. I enjoyed you so much and want to thank you for giving me hope when I had none and to laugh and forgive not dwell in the past. Thanks to you I can go forward, thank you from my heart. You will be missed.
Posted by Nicole Dooley on September 14, 2022
We miss you Gpa ❤️

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Doug Little on September 19, 2022
I met Dools shortly after my wife died when I was looking for a captain to replace my wife on our tour boat. Our mutual friend Ron put us together. One afternoon we sat on the deck of my business, and we started to talk. I had had two unsuccessful captains before that that lasted about a month each. I knew after a few minutes that it was going to work out we spent the next 4 hours talking about Wisconsin, boating, sailing flying private planes, dressage horses, failed marriages, our very different early business careers, and then owning our own businesses. We also talked about our mutual love of the river, its history, the wildlife and plants. He started the next day.
Over the more than five years we spent many hours sitting on the deck at work reminiscing about our lives, wives and businesses. Over time the business grew in both the quality and people. Our mutual point of honor is when after 3 years together we were awarded by Trip Advisor a Certificate of being one of the top 10% of all attractions worldwide. Very recently the Canadian Google Travel Committee awarded us their top Award for the quality of our tour. Dooley was delighted as was I. His goal was to obtain the designation of being one of the top 1% worldwide. Unfortunately, I became ill for the past 2 years and he took over running the business without even being asked. Last year I spent 145 days in the hospital and rehab facility and the prior year there were shorter stays but accumulated to 75 days and a lot of healing at home. I think we could have made the top one percent had I not been Ill. He always said in describing us that I was Johnny Carson, and he was Ed McMann. Being an old guy often times on tour I would loose the name of a bird, plant or animal and he would fill it in without a moments delay. We would breakup the tour into modules and only talk about the things we would see on tour. His knowledge was so varied and deep that even if I did what I knew he would add his knowledge and our guests would routinely say I have lived on the river the past 30 years and learned more today than I ever knew. WE loved what we did, and it will not be duplicated without him. One of his idiosyncratic qualities was that he had such a wide and varied vocabulary that we would sit on the deck and in casual conversation he would correct my lack correct word usage. Little things that I will miss was our almost daily telephone conversations that we would have in the evening after we had enjoyed an adult beverage or two. Bill was a man of great loyalty, responsibility to me and a man of principals. He died doing what he loved on the river on the Naiad at Highbanks Marina.
There is a 187-word poem called The Dash that I feel is fitting and I would like to share.
The Dash
I read of a man who stood to speak at a funeral of a friend. He referred to the dates on the tombstone from the beginning…to the end.
He noted that first came the date of birth and spoke of the following date with tears but said what mattered most of all was the dash between those years.
For that dash represents all the time they spent alive on earth and now only those who loved them know what that little line is worth.
For it matters not, how much we own, the cars…the house…the cash. What matters is how we lived and loved and how we spend our dash.
So, think about this long and hard; are there things you’d like to change? For you never know how much time is left that still can be rearranged.
To be less quick to anger and show appreciation more and love the people in our lives like we’ve never loved before.
If we treat each other with respect and more often wear a smile…remembering that this special dash might only last a little while.
So, when your eulogy is being read, with your life’s actions to rehash, would you be proud of the things they say about how you lived your dash?
Linda Ellis

Dooley
I’ll miss you.

Doug Little

Posted by Wayne Sargent on September 16, 2022
My wife and I met Bill (better known as Dooley) when we were weekenders at the marina. We got to know him really well when we became live-a-boards and dock neighbors in 2003 and formed a tight friendship that has lasted since. We moved from Florida in 2019 but maintained contact since. I was shocked and saddened to hear of his passing. To me, he was one of the memorable good guys that seem to leave us too soon. I will miss him.
Posted by Page Connelly on September 15, 2022
Gail & I were truly shocked to learn of Dooley’s passing. We used to spend winters living on our Carver 42CMY which we kept docked on E dock in Boat Tree Marina & the first person we met was Dooley. We had an instant connection right from the start. We shared many a happy hour on the aft deck as well as dinners together and many rides on the St John’s. We spent November through April for 4-5 years and Dooley was always the first to welcome. We stayed in touch via email & text after we sold our boat & will miss him for sure. I am proud to call Dooley my friend & May you Rest In Peace.
Recent stories

Mr. Dooley

Shared by Amanda Sampaio Bova on September 14, 2022
I remember Mr. Dooley from childhood. We lived down the street and I remember many fun adventures on the lake with him. One night we went spotlighting for alligators and lost a few flashlights in the water. Another time he took us on a late night safari in an army jeep through the woods. He was always fun to be around. Seeing the picture of his first place chili cookoff reminded me of the time when us kids stuffed the ballot box. Oops! I actually remember him bringing Blane to school on the first day of kindergarten at SMM. He was a memorable guy and a true family man. 
Shared by Nicole Dooley on September 14, 2022
Death is nothing at all.
It does not count.
I have only slipped away into the next room.
Everything remains as it was.
The old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged.
Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.
Call me by the old familiar name.
Speak of me in the easy way which you always used.
Put no sorrow in your tone.
Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together.
Play, smile, think of me, pray for me.
Let my name be ever the household word that it always was.
Let it be spoken without  effort
Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was.
There is unbroken continuity.
Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight?
I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner.
All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost.
One brief moment and all will be as it was before.
How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting,  when we meet again.

Source: derived from a sermon written by Henry Scott Holland and delivered in St. Paul's (London) on 15 May 1910, at which time the body of King Edward VII was lying in state at Westminster. Although not originally derived from Irish writings, versions of this sermon have been used at many Irish and Catholic funerals over the years.