ForeverMissed

This website was created in memorial, and to celebrate the life of Hubert Earl Thomas, Sr., 60, born on August 7, 1929 and passed away on June 25, 1990. We will remember him forever. 

Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 19, 2020
Happy heavenly anniversary my love...until we meet again.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 25, 2020
Today marks a milestone, it's been 30-years since your passing. If I were still in Detroit I would be visiting your mausoleum and placing flowers. I still sometimes cry, but I try to make it less often because I know you wouldn't want me to be sad, so I'll remember the good times. As one of our favorite songs goes, "tonight, I will be looking at the moon, but I'll be seeing you." Rest peacefully my love, until we meet again.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 25, 2014
How lucky, no, how blessed I was to have met, fell in love with, and then married you. How even more blessed we were to have found each other. You were my soul-mate, a term that people pass around so easily, but you definitely were mine. We could almost read each others minds, and in the end we did just that. Your last words to me were, "someday you will wake up and I won't be here." I said, "would you leave without saying good-bye?" You then said, "I believe it would hurt too much." So that's what you did, you waited until I fell asleep and you drifted out of my life. Out of my life, but never out of my heart. Thank you for showing me what love "REALLY" is.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 19, 2013
Today would have been our 26th wedding anniversary. Like the previous 25 years I have had to celebrate them only in memories. There is not a day, or night that goes by I don't think about you and miss you terribly. You were, and are forever my one true love.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 3, 2013
Yesterday was the first night in my new apartment. I remember how you use to say that when you retired we would build a house in Montgomery. Well, it's not a house, but it is definitely a home. As I sat on my balcony watching the sun set over Monte Sano mountain, I couldn't help but wish you were beside me.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on August 12, 2013
Dorian gave birth to a beautiful little girl last Thursday. True to her/your Leo sign, she wanted to have a birthday of her own, like Darlita's daughter who was born on August 6th. We would have been celebrating birthdays on August 6th; 7th (your birthday); August 8th (Chase's birthday); and August 9th, my brother James'.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on August 7, 2013
Another year has passed since your last birthday remembrance, but I thank God that I have wonderful, beautiful memories of you. Love always, Donna
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 25, 2013
Today we remember and celebrate your life, instead of just mourning your passing. Today marks the 23rd year of your transition from this life to eternal peace. Know that we think of you, speak your name and love you every second of every minute, every hour in every day. Until we meet again.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 19, 2012
Today we would be celebrating our twenty-fifth (25) wedding anniversary. I will play some of our favorite songs, and think about you and us. Loving you, always
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 1, 2012
Yesterday, your friend, Lions Club member and poker buddy was laid to rest (James Sparks). I spoke to his widow, Emma, and I tried to console her as best I could. It's never easy, and especially since she and Jim were married for much longer than you and I.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on October 25, 2012
Last night I had a dream about you. We were dancing, and you started singing "Night and Day." There are times when I feel my heart will break, but then I say to myself, he wouldn't want you to be sad. So I will cherish the dreams when you come to me and sing Night and Day, because that's how I think about you, day and night.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on August 7, 2012
Today we would have been celebrating your birthday. I'm here in Alabama and Dorian and I thought of you. You will forever be in our thoughts and our prayers. A day doesn't go by without me thinking of you at least once. Loving you...
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 26, 2012
Today I chose a song that reminded me so much of you, and of us, ballroom dancing. How every appropriate, "The Man I Love."
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 25, 2012
Today marks 22 years since you left us, and the void is still as wide and the hurt is still as deep. The tears still well up in my eyes, like today. I slough off suggestions of dating anymore, it's not fair when I compare someone to you, who is incomparable. Until you come for me (like our favorite movie) "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir", I'll go on living, watching the sunsets.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 17, 2012
Today is Sunday, Father's Day. I would be fixing a big dinner and waiting for all the children and grandchildren to come by to see you. Instead, I'm writing on your memorial page. We speak your name everyday, and I still miss you soooo very much. Loving you, and Happy Father's Day.
Posted by Grace & Raymond Bazmore on December 7, 2011
We will never forget Hubert. He was a best friend, a special person to whom I (Ray) was closely connected, not only as a fellow Lion, but in a much more personal way. You will always be in our hearts, Hubert. 'Til we meet again.
Ray and Grace
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 29, 2011
I watched the love of my life slowly slip away, his body ravished by the terminal pancreatic cancer with which he had been diagnosed fifteen months earlier. I felt a part of me was dying with him, the part that was the best because of knowing and loving him. I thank God for allowing me to be with him in the good times, and his final challenge.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 19, 2020
Happy heavenly anniversary my love...until we meet again.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 25, 2020
Today marks a milestone, it's been 30-years since your passing. If I were still in Detroit I would be visiting your mausoleum and placing flowers. I still sometimes cry, but I try to make it less often because I know you wouldn't want me to be sad, so I'll remember the good times. As one of our favorite songs goes, "tonight, I will be looking at the moon, but I'll be seeing you." Rest peacefully my love, until we meet again.
Posted by Donna Johnson-Thomas on June 25, 2014
How lucky, no, how blessed I was to have met, fell in love with, and then married you. How even more blessed we were to have found each other. You were my soul-mate, a term that people pass around so easily, but you definitely were mine. We could almost read each others minds, and in the end we did just that. Your last words to me were, "someday you will wake up and I won't be here." I said, "would you leave without saying good-bye?" You then said, "I believe it would hurt too much." So that's what you did, you waited until I fell asleep and you drifted out of my life. Out of my life, but never out of my heart. Thank you for showing me what love "REALLY" is.
his Life

Malcolm X's Eulogy with Hubert's name substituted, and also changed to Detroit instead of Harlem

Here—at this final hour, in this quiet place—Detroit (Harlem)  has come to bid farewell to one of its brightest hopes—extinguished now, and gone from us forever. For Detroit (Harlem) is where he worked and where he struggled and fought—his home of homes, where his heart was, and where his people are—and it is, therefore, most fitting that we meet once again—in Detroit (Harlem)—to share these last moments with him.

For Detroit (Harlem) has ever been gracious to those who have loved her, have fought for her and have defended her honor even to the death. It is not in the memory of man that this beleaguered, unfortunate, but nonetheless proud community has found a braver, more gallant young champion than this Afro-American who lies before us—unconquered still.

I say the word again, as he would want me to: Afro-American—Afro-American Hubert (Malcolm), who was a master, was most meticulous in his use of words. Nobody knew better than he the power words have over minds of men.

Hubert (Malcolm) had stopped being a Negro years ago. It had become too small, too puny, too weak a word for him. Hubert (Malcolm) was bigger than that. Hubert (Malcolm) had become an Afro-American, and he wanted—so desperately—that we, that all his people, would become Afro-Americans, too.

There are those who will consider it their duty, as friends of the Negro people, to tell us to revile him, to flee, even from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times.

Many will ask what Detroit ( Harlem) finds to honor in this stormy, controversial and bold young captain—and we will smile. Many will say turn away—away from this man; for he is not a man but a demon, a monster, a subverter and an enemy of the black man—and we will smile. They will say that he is of hate—a fanatic, a racist—who can only bring evil to the cause for which you struggle! And we will answer and say to them:

Did you ever talk to Brother Hubert (Malcolm)? Did you ever touch him or have him smile at you? Did you ever really listen to him? Did he ever do a mean thing? Was he ever himself associated with violence or any public disturbance? For if you did, you would know him. And if you knew him, you would know why we must honor him: Hubert (Malcolm) was our manhood, our living, black manhood!

This was his meaning to his people. And, in honoring him, we honor the best in ourselves. Last year, from Africa, he wrote these words to a friend: My journey, he says, is almost ended, and I have a much broader scope than when I started out, which I believe will add new life and dimension to our struggle for freedom and honor and dignity in the States.

I am writing these things so that you will know for a fact the tremendous sympathy and support we have among the African States for our human rights struggle. The main thing is that we keep a united front wherein our most valuable time and energy will not be wasted fighting each other.

However we may have differed with him—or with each other about him and his value as a man—let his going from us serve only to bring us together, now.

Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man—but a seed—which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us.

And we will know him then for what he was and is—a prince—our own black shining prince!—who didn't hesitate to die, because he loved us so.



(Eulogy given by Ossie Davis at Malcolm X's funeral)
Faith Temple Church of God In Christ, New York City - February 27, 1965

Recent stories
Shared by Donna Johnson-Thomas on September 11, 2013

These are the lyrics to a song by Tim McGraw, a Country-Western artist.  But it just seems to sum up the last 14 months of Hubert's life.  I get my appreciation of ALL kinds of music from my dad.  He would tell me, "just listen to the words, baby."  

                 ~ The name of the song is "Live Like You Were Dying ~

He said, I was in my early forties with a lot of life before me when a moment came that stopped me on a dime I spent most of the next days, looking at the x-rays talking 'bout the options and talking 'bout sweet times I asked him when it sank in that this might really be the real end how's it hit 'cha when you get that kind of news? Man, what'd  ya do? He said I went skydiving, I went rocky mountain climbing, I went  two point seven seconds on a bull named Fu Man Chu, and I loved deeper and I spoke sweeter, and I gave forgiveness I'd been denyin'.

And he said, Someday I hope you get the chance to live like you were dyin'.

He said, I was finally the husband that most the time I wasn't, and I became a friend, a friend would like to have.  And all of a sudden goin' fishin' wasn't such an  imposition, and I went three times that year I lost my dad. Well I finally read the good book and I took a good long hard look at what I'd do if I could do it all again, and then, I went skydiving I went rocky mountain climbing, I went  two point seven seconds on a bull named Fu Man Chu, and I loved deeper, and I spoke sweeter and I gave forgiveness I'd been denyin'.

And he said, Someday I hope you get the chance to live like you were dyin'.

Like tomorrow was a gift and ya got eternity to think about what to do with it, what did you do with it? What did I do with it? What would I do with it?

Skydiving, I went rocky mountain climbing, I went two  point seven seconds on a bull named Fu Man Chu and I loved deeper, and I spoke sweeter, and I watched an eagle as it was flyin'.

And he said, Someday I hope you get the chance to live like you were dyin'.

To live like you were dyin' To live like you were dyin' To live like you were dyin' To live like you were dyin'.

 

 

 

New Years Eve - 1987

Shared by Donna Johnson-Thomas on November 1, 2012

We had this party the year we got married. Parts of it are a little shaky, I didn't know how to edit those parts out.  Funny how you can forget how somebody sounded, their laugh and voice.  It was 1990, when you were diagnosed with cancer.  You passed just before our third annniversary.


I'm just glad I was able to transfer this video into your memorial, so that your children and friends can enjoy it as much as I do.
  

Old School

Shared by Donna Johnson-Thomas on February 21, 2012

 

I found this song, and thought of you Hubert.  I'm so grateful I had the parents I had, and that they exposed me to this type of music.  I'm listening to it, and thinking how much we use to ballroom.  Al Hibbler singing "after the lights go down low."