ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, James Manolides 76 years old , born on March 19, 1940 and passed away on May 9, 2016. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Liz Chenoweth on March 19, 2020
Another year gone by. I miss you! I am so grateful for all the memories, the wonderful art, the music. Your loving, artistic, energetic spirit surrounds me here at the “chicken shack” (as you called my home). If there is such a thing as life after death, I’m sure you’re stirring things up wherever you are. I love you Jimmy and miss you so much, Liz
Posted by Liz Chenoweth on May 9, 2018
Oh Jimmy, I’m so grateful for the time we spent together! All the loving, talking, playing cards, traveling, enjoying the beautiful calm of Ocean Shores, the music, and so much more. I miss you. I’m also grateful for the art and beautiful things you left me as I feel comforted by them everyday. I feel so sad right now. I miss you! Love Liz
Posted by Robin Atkins on May 9, 2018
It is a tribute to you, Jimmy, that having only been around you two times, I still vividly remember your smile, piano playing, singing, the splendid meal you prepared for us, your paintings and photos on the walls of your comfortable home, and most of all the joy and laughter you imbued into the evening. Keep singin', playin', laughin', and lovin' wherever you are!
Posted by Liz Chenoweth on November 24, 2016
It's Thanksgiving 2016. I'm missing Jimmy so much. This is the first one without him since we got together.
Posted by Frank Samuelson on May 30, 2016
In the late 70's Jimmy owned part interest , with Jean Falls, a stunning theroughbred named Savanna Blue Jeans and another named Vamp of Savanna. It was through Jimmy and Tom Wilson that Leslie Lepere and I got to meet the Alhadeffs at Longacres and Morrie contracted us to do the year book cover. We couldn't be more excited to associated with these fellows. Fine memories from a great time to be in Seattle.
Posted by Frank Samuelson on May 29, 2016
I met Jimmy when his gallery was at 105 S. Main. It was the best of places and the art was trey skookum, absolutely the best. Later on I got to show there and at the other addresses he leased, kind of a badge of honor in the NW art world. Midway through on showing he had sold a couple of paintings and I asked him for some of the money, being a starving or near starving artist and he said "No". " you are on a thirty day payment and if you beat me up for it then I won't pay you any of it because you will have already collected beating my ass up". Until he mentioned it I hadn't thought of kicking his ass but , needless to say, he had methods to deal with conflict. Jimmy paid me at the end of the month, like he said he would and life went on. I was beginning to learn the lessons of the business side of the art scene, now being fortunate to have had some of those with Jim.
Posted by Frank Samuelson on May 29, 2016
Suzanne Lamon and I were on Sunset Beach in Hawaii when we heard the news of Jimmy's passing. It wasn't unexpected because of the health issues he was having but it was still a sad note. We had reconnected in the present day and we're sending notes back and forth weekly. On one visit at our place in Pt Townsend he bought some fish art and a Suzanne chicken print and paid for it with a his wad of dough he'd made from a sale of items at a Ocean Shores swap meet. Liz was in attendance and we all had a time hacking it up about old stuff, new stuff and future stuff.
On another note he was coaching me on his research on the topic of Mike's Chili recipe. He had been trying for thirty years ( he said ) to replicate that special chili famous in Seattle... Ballard. He even sent me photos of the steps and ingredients as they marched into the " soup".
I'm missing a lot of that fellow.
Posted by Robin Atkins on May 19, 2016
Liz, being my best friend for 40+ years, of course told me all about Jimmy. I had the pleasure of meeting him twice, once in his home, where he and Liz prepared a sumptuous, Greek dinner for me and three friends traveling with me. After dinner, he sang and entertained us royally for more than an hour. We loved it; and loved him. Who could help it? In just one evening, it was totally obvious how Liz could cherish him and enjoy her time with him so much. He loved to cook, loved to sing, loved to tell stories, loved good art, and loved Liz... these things were obvious right away. I can only guess at the depth and breadth of his personality, and wish there had been more time with him for all of us.
Posted by Liz Chenoweth on May 16, 2016
Jimmy and I reconnected 2 1/2 years ago after not having contact for 40 years. They have been good years, with lots of laughter, music, art, food, drink, travels and love. I feel very blessed to have had this time together. I met some wonderful people through Jimmy. 
He designed and built his house in Ocean Shores. The house is filled with art, pots and pans (he loved to cook) boxes of articles written about Jimmy over the years, golf clubs, tools, paints, collections of fun things like scrabble tiles, wishbones, levels, measuring tapes to name a few and much much more. I loved his home from the very first time I drove down to Ocean Shores and saw the giant metal rooster out front. Jimmy taught me how to play Gin. We both loved playing. We played almost everyday when we were together; even in the hospital when Jimmy had to play one handed. We had so much fun and connected on so many different levels. I keep expecting my phone to ring and to hear his beautiful voice. I'm missing him very much.

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Liz Chenoweth on March 19, 2020
Another year gone by. I miss you! I am so grateful for all the memories, the wonderful art, the music. Your loving, artistic, energetic spirit surrounds me here at the “chicken shack” (as you called my home). If there is such a thing as life after death, I’m sure you’re stirring things up wherever you are. I love you Jimmy and miss you so much, Liz
Posted by Liz Chenoweth on May 9, 2018
Oh Jimmy, I’m so grateful for the time we spent together! All the loving, talking, playing cards, traveling, enjoying the beautiful calm of Ocean Shores, the music, and so much more. I miss you. I’m also grateful for the art and beautiful things you left me as I feel comforted by them everyday. I feel so sad right now. I miss you! Love Liz
Posted by Robin Atkins on May 9, 2018
It is a tribute to you, Jimmy, that having only been around you two times, I still vividly remember your smile, piano playing, singing, the splendid meal you prepared for us, your paintings and photos on the walls of your comfortable home, and most of all the joy and laughter you imbued into the evening. Keep singin', playin', laughin', and lovin' wherever you are!
Recent stories

Jimmy's obituary published in the Seattle Times

Shared by Liz Chenoweth on June 29, 2016


 Jimmy Manolides, a Seattle musician and art curator, dies at 76

Originally published May 10, 2016 at 3:06 pm Updated May 13, 2016 at 2:21 pm

 

Jimmy Manolides, who opened one of the first galleries in Pioneer Square and played bass in rock groups the Frantics and Junior Cadillac, has died at 76.

Jimmy Manolides, 76, an early Seattle art curator, rock ’n’ roll bass player for The Frantics and Junior Cadillac, and gregarious bohemian bartender, has died.

Jimmy Manolides, who opened one of the first galleries in Pioneer Square during its 1970s revitalization and played  in the ’50s rock group the Frantics — and later with roots-rock revivalists Junior Cadillac — died Monday, May 9. He was 76.

The cause was a stroke, which he had three weeks ago, according to his sister, Sandy Parnell. Mr. Manolides had been living in Ocean Shores for 13 years and died in Hoquiam.

An effervescent bohemian, Mr. Manolides was known in the ’70s and ’80s to jazz fans as the gravel-voiced bartender with a million stories at Parnell’s jazz club, owned by Roy Parnell, Sandy Parnell’s late husband. In the 1990s, Manolides was a familiar figure behind the counter at Nickel Cigar, on Yesler Avenue, formerly the Manolides Gallery.

Born in Seattle, Mr. Manolides was the son of King County Deputy Prosecutor and Seattle District Court Judge Evans Manolides. Jimmy Manolides went to Ballard High School and began playing with The Frantics. A self-taught musician, he graduated from the University of Washington with a degree in art, was drafted, and served in the U.S. Army as an art instructor at Fort Dix, N.J. When he came home, he opened the Manolides Gallery.

 

“Jimmy was a bigger-than-life kind of guy, so naturally gifted with his music, his art,” Parnell said.

Mr. Manolides also loved golf and owned race horses — among them, Savannah Blue Jeans, a competitor at theLongacres racetrack in Renton, which closed in 1992.

About eight years ago, Parnell said, Mr. Manolides became a Christian and started playing keyboard at the Galilean Lutheran Church in Ocean Shores.

“Before you knew it, there was a ‘Jimmy Service,’ where he added his rock ’n’ roll touch to every gospel song he played,” she said.

Mr. Manolides married four times. He is survived by a son, Louie Manolides, 36, of Renton; his sister Sandy Parnell, 70, of Lynnwood; a niece and nephew; and two grandchildren.

A service will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 15, at the Galilean Lutheran Church, 824 Ocean Shores Blvd. N.W., in Ocean Shores.

Paul de Barros: 206-464-3247;

Letter I sent to the Seattle Times to fill out some of what they left out in the obituary they publish about him

Shared by Liz Chenoweth on June 29, 2016

Dear Sir,

I want to add a few things about Jimmy Manolides that were not mentioned in your obituary published last Tuesday May 10, 2016.

These are quotes taken from an article written  about  Jimmy in 1984 by Regina Hackett who was then the Art and Music critic for the PI.

"Unquestionably, Manolides is a bona fide local celebrity alternatingly charming his way into power and insulting his way out of it. 

He grew up in Ballard, a grade school wise guy renowned for his musical savvy.  He introduced his cronies to saxophonists Eddie Cleanhead Vinson, Sonny Stitt and Ornette Cobb.  Hanging around in his parents' garage, he accompanied Spike Jones Records on washboards, tin cans and car horns.

When rock 'n' roll hit the mid 50s he was ready.  'The kind of rock 'n' roll I liked was kid jazz' he said, 'with saxophones in it.'  He thought of rock n roll as the musical minor leagues and wasted no time suiting up."...

Jimmy Manolides has the kind of voice alley cats defer to.  Harsh and gravelly, it digs into a melody the way a jackhammer digs into a street...

Success came easy and he's been a fixture on the rock n roll scene ever since, starting as bass player in the Frantics, playing with Jr. Cadillac, the Hardly Everly Brothers, and Les Follies a group of local musical all stars that plays only a couple of times a year...

On a shoestring budget, he has managed to become a wheeler dealer at the racetrack, owning a hefty percentage of such race horses as Savanna Blue Jeans and Vamp of Savanna...

The idea that a born-to-rock-'n'-roll good time guy could open an art gallery that would have a significant impact on high-art culture seems plausible today but must have been a novelty item in 1968, when Manolides return to Seattle after a stint in the Army and opened his space.

He was, however, interested in the same thing in art that moved him in music.  He responded to humor, outrageousness and funky color...

Fortunately for him, his gallery opened at the same time as Northern California funk artists hit their stride. In introducing artists such as William T. Wiley, Roy DeForest, Clayton Bailey, David Gilhooly and Irv Tepper to this area, Manolides was in the right place at the right time. 

His gallery also offered local artists working the madcap vein a place to show.  Howard Kottler, Fred Baure, Patti Warashina, Richard Marquis and T. Michael Gardiner all got the chance to show their work in a sympathetic context. "

Jimmy Manolides played a very important role in Seattle's music and art history.  I just thought this should be added to the information already published.

Liz Chenoweth

 

Jimmy tells about his house on Mead Street

Shared by Liz Chenoweth on May 29, 2016

Another story that Jimmy emailed me on 10-15-2013 and a drawing of the house by (I think) Les LePere:

 "pertaining to mead street:

various things pop into my head about that house and the way things happened.  in pioneer square was a handy man that worked for the underground tours.  he was a cigarette smoker, and i guess that's how i got to know him.  (can't even recall his name at the moment.  dave something)  anyway, he came at an affordable rate, and helped me at the house with certain electrical issues.  on one of the jobs he did for me, he brought along an assistant that was a lesbian woman.  it was to be her last job working for him as she and a couple of her friends were about to embark on a business adventure.  it was to be an adult bookstore and toy shop they would call "toys in babeland".  knowing her (but not in the Biblical sense) i of course patronized her new store.  it is where i acquired those two glass dildos that you saw on the window sill in the attic, among other things of a more pedestrian nature.  i have always referred to shops that deal in those and similar products with a term borrowed from an episode of fawlty towers.  it came at some point in the episode of the man that had died in his sleep. the term is "prophylactic emporium"   a couple other curious things about mead street were the bottle fences, and the alley "takeover".   i think i would rather describe these when i see you if you are interested.   materials frequently dictate design.     pacific iron on 4th avenue south for a long time was a very interesting building materials outlet that dealt in a lot of both salvage and liquidation at excellent prices, in many cases somewhat negotiable.  accordingly, i spent a good deal of time shopping there while involved in the major remodel.  one day i noticed a ten foot long piece of maple kitchen counter that had been removed from a restaurant at less than ten cents on the dollar.  needless to say, i snapped it up and it became part of my new kitchen.  not long after that, one morning while returning to the cigar store from the bank, i noticed that this little greasy spoon on occidental park was remodeling and had thrown out two similar maple counters of about seven feet in length.  they were simply leaning up against the dumpster, so i hurried to get my truck and snagged them.  gratis.  while chris was refurbishing the old garage, he recalled having seen a classified ad for some very large doors that had great panes of etched glass in them.  they had come out of the mirabeaux restaurant atop the rainier tower.  we should be able to discover some photos of how they looked as part of the project.  also at the same time, pacific iron had an ample supply of tongue and groove hemlock boards that were to become not only the floor for the garage, but the ceiling in the house remodel.  while designing the cigar store, he noticed another classified ad for 30 some odd sheets of walnut paneling, which i bought for $300.  the same material from a retail supplier would have cost $3,000. plus tax.  as you have seen, the serendipitous availability of certain sinks had a lot to do with the design of both the kitchen and bath here at amen corner. back to mead street, during a certain period of time, a lumber yard on rainier avenue had advertised on their marquee fir flooring "seconds".  that material became a herringbone floor in the old part of the house covering both living room and bedroom. leftovers from that project were used to create the tall tower in the garden that you saw a picture of last week. at another lumber yard on mlk way and just off rainier, i one day discovered a great stack of well weathered 6 x 10 timbers of various lengths, none shorter than ten feet.  these i was also able to get at "a steal", and they became an integral part of the gardens at mead street.  one morning while shopping at eagle hardware on rainier, i noticed a large dolly stacked with more than enough clear cedar 2x4s to build a 200 square foot deck.  it was leftover material from their having just erected their display at the home show, and i was the lucky one to grab it at less than ten cents on the dollar.  the chips have fallen my way so many times it is hard to fathom.  yet another feature in the remodel of mead street were the windows.  i had gone out to this place near lynnwood that manufactured custom windows and found in their "boneyard" four extremely expensive windows that they had made a minor mistake in the building of same and was able to acquire them for $500, their value if perfect $3,200 or possibly more.  the result was exquisite to say the least.   and good morning to you.  i believe i will now return to my bed."