ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in honor of our loving mother Margaret "Maggie" Stewart, born on January 5, 1931, and passed away on September 6, 2022. We will remember her forever.  A note of rememberwnce would be greatly appreciated.
Donations can be given to the North Queensbury (Bay Ridge) EMS.
Posted by Gail Stewart on September 30, 2022
  Maggie welcomed me into her family 35 years ago with her warmth and generosity. I'm fortunate to have so many memories of the time we spent with Bob and Maggie at their home on Lake George. From huge family dinners and Sunday breakfasts filled with donuts, bacon and eggs, and newspapers strewn across the table, to terrifying sail boat rides. Bob always assured me that the keel prevented the boat from tipping over. I still don't believe that. Sunset motor boat rides along the shore were much more my speed. But my favorite memories of Maggie are as a quintessential grandmother to my boys. She always remembered their favorite foods, and had them there. She spent hours on the dock, watching them catch tiny sunfish. Playing endless games of Go Fish and Old Maid. Magically, she always ended up with the old maid card. The lake was never too cold for her to swim when her grandchildren wanted to play in the water. They were never too noisy or messy, even when they left wet towels and toys all over the house. She'd genuinely laugh at their jokes and watch endless Disney movies, allowing Sean and me some time to ourselves.
  I miss all of that. I hope that Maggie is replaying all of her happiest memories with the people that she loved.
Posted by Zach Stewart on September 27, 2022
I have a vivid memory of laying in the front yard at the house in Assembly Point. It is one of my earliest, I must have been around five, and was always a nervous child. I remember the deep green of the grass divided from the gravel of the driveway by a perimeter of wooden beams and I was sitting on one of these laying with my back in the grass. We had spent the weekend and were getting ready for the drive back down to Albany. My parents must have moved the car or gone to get gas while I was packing inside because when I came out they were gone and I was convinced I’d never see them again. I remember laying in the grass despondent, totally unable to comprehend my new solitude in the world when grandma Maggie came and laid down beside me. She asked me how I was and spoke to me not as a child but an equal person, and not only because of my distress but because she genuinely was interested in who I was. That is who she was. Of course, as we laid in the grass talking and watching the butterflies fluttering above us, my parents did come back. And even though that house is gone from my life now, it will always return to my memory when I need comfort big or small, just as she will. I love you grandma, you’ll always be with me.
Posted by Sam Stewart on September 27, 2022
I still have dreams about the drive up to Lake George, the sound of the waves against the dock and the sting of water rushing up my nose. I dream about Grandma's smile and the sound of her laughter in the sun. I feel so much of my childhood in those dreams, and so much of her. I never want to let them go, and I never will. I miss you Grandma, and I love you forever.
Posted by Tony Kerst on September 26, 2022
About 30 years ago, I invited my sisters to join me in putting together an anthology of stories about growing up in Schroon Lake. Maggie, Pat and Joey all sent interesting memories of their early lives in the Kerst family.  I think Maggie would be happy to have some of her stories shared on her memory pages......

Stories from Maggie......

The Sea Fox

…...There came a day when Dad brought home a sailboat, which I think, he acquired from James Davignon who lived in the Newcomb area. “Jimmy our dog” also came from the same man. I don’t know how the Sea Fox got from Newcomb to Schroon Lake, but who on Fowler Ave., can ever forget the twice a year excitement of putting it in and taking out of the water!
   A cradle held the Sea Fox, but there as not trailer to move it. So, Dad devised a system of 3 steel pipe rollers, with a car to pull the cradle, another to hold it back while going down the hill on Fowler Ave. The rest of us would move the roller in back (as soon as it came free) which we would then bring up to the front of the cradle and insert it under the heavy skids. This procession would continue the length of Fowler Ave with much help—both verbal and physical—from all residents until we reached Keppler’s beach. Then it was a matter of rolling/shoving the cradle into the water until the Sea Fox floated off, and it could be anchored in deeper water for the summer.
  We all learned to sail during those wonderful summer days on Schroon Lake.


Mr. Williford and Mr. Haley (local residents)

…..They had both been in WWI. Mr. Williford had had his left leg shot off and walked with crutches, and Mr. Haley had been gassed. I would wonder which would be worse....and decided the gas wouldn't be so bad because Mr. Haley rode around in a neat jeep.


Mr. Brown

…...There was an elderly black man who lived in Schroon Lake. Dad liked him, and said his name was John Brown. I thought he had that name because his skin was brown. I was around 6 or 7 then.


A Night at the Rowanberry Inn...about 1948

Francis and Eleanor Rowan turned their big house south of Schroon Lake village into a small inn, with good food in their dining room and a wonderful cozy bar in another room. Ray Laurita was bartender for a few years, and I know that Joey was a waitress there later.

The Rowanberry tree is the same as a mountain ash, only Irish.

The bar was a favorite place to go after we all got out of work at our own summer jobs. There was always good conversation, new people to meet-especially camp counsellors, WOO WOO!! and draft beer, ice cold.
I remember a night when a man came in carrying a guitar. He regaled us with wonderful songs....”Aunt Rhodie”, “Goodnight Irene”, “Down in the Valley”....and we all sang along. It was just a wonderful rhapsodic sort of night, lots of friendship and good feelings.

It was quite a while later, that I realized we had spent a very special evening with Pete Seeger.



Well done, Maggie. A life well lived and loved. In our hearts forever......
Tony & Dottie Kerst

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Gail Stewart on September 30, 2022
  Maggie welcomed me into her family 35 years ago with her warmth and generosity. I'm fortunate to have so many memories of the time we spent with Bob and Maggie at their home on Lake George. From huge family dinners and Sunday breakfasts filled with donuts, bacon and eggs, and newspapers strewn across the table, to terrifying sail boat rides. Bob always assured me that the keel prevented the boat from tipping over. I still don't believe that. Sunset motor boat rides along the shore were much more my speed. But my favorite memories of Maggie are as a quintessential grandmother to my boys. She always remembered their favorite foods, and had them there. She spent hours on the dock, watching them catch tiny sunfish. Playing endless games of Go Fish and Old Maid. Magically, she always ended up with the old maid card. The lake was never too cold for her to swim when her grandchildren wanted to play in the water. They were never too noisy or messy, even when they left wet towels and toys all over the house. She'd genuinely laugh at their jokes and watch endless Disney movies, allowing Sean and me some time to ourselves.
  I miss all of that. I hope that Maggie is replaying all of her happiest memories with the people that she loved.
Posted by Zach Stewart on September 27, 2022
I have a vivid memory of laying in the front yard at the house in Assembly Point. It is one of my earliest, I must have been around five, and was always a nervous child. I remember the deep green of the grass divided from the gravel of the driveway by a perimeter of wooden beams and I was sitting on one of these laying with my back in the grass. We had spent the weekend and were getting ready for the drive back down to Albany. My parents must have moved the car or gone to get gas while I was packing inside because when I came out they were gone and I was convinced I’d never see them again. I remember laying in the grass despondent, totally unable to comprehend my new solitude in the world when grandma Maggie came and laid down beside me. She asked me how I was and spoke to me not as a child but an equal person, and not only because of my distress but because she genuinely was interested in who I was. That is who she was. Of course, as we laid in the grass talking and watching the butterflies fluttering above us, my parents did come back. And even though that house is gone from my life now, it will always return to my memory when I need comfort big or small, just as she will. I love you grandma, you’ll always be with me.
Posted by Sam Stewart on September 27, 2022
I still have dreams about the drive up to Lake George, the sound of the waves against the dock and the sting of water rushing up my nose. I dream about Grandma's smile and the sound of her laughter in the sun. I feel so much of my childhood in those dreams, and so much of her. I never want to let them go, and I never will. I miss you Grandma, and I love you forever.
her Life
Margaret "Maggie" M. Stewart passed away on September 6, 2022, at the age of 91 after a long and joyful life.
Unflappable and always kind to all those around her, she was a teacher whose constant lesson was compassion. Born on January 5, 1931, Maggie was the daughter of Dwinal Kerst and Margaret (Koen) Kerst. She grew up in Schroon Lake, N.Y. The Adirondacks were her playground where she would hike, boat, ski, and snowshoe. She attended college at Cortland College (now SUNY Cortland) where she received a degree in physical education. She taught physical education in Chatham and Schroon Lake. She married Robert Stewart on January 14, 1956.
Maggie was a long-time member of the North Queensbury Rescue Squad where she served as an Emergency Medical Technician. She was appointed by Governor Hugh Carey as a Commissioner of the Lake George Park Commission. She served on the Commission through the Carey, Mario Cuomo, and Pataki administrations. She also volunteered with several service organizations within her community. As a teacher for Literacy Volunteers, she taught reading to inmates at Great Meadow prison during the 1970's. She was predeceased by her husband, Bob in 2001 and her son, Mark 1978. Maggie is survived by four children: Brian (Bonnie) Stewart of Chateaugay Lake, N.Y.; Sean (Gail) Stewart of Glenmont, N.Y.; Marcy (Robert) Birch of Cooperstown, N.Y.; and Daniel (Wendy) Stewart of Queensbury, N.Y.; nine grandchildren: Sarah Stark; Laura Dumas; Samuel Stewart; Zachary Stewart; Jonathan Birch; Anthony Birch; Emily Stewart; Molly Stewart; Liam Stewart; three great-grandchildren, Ayanna Lee, Mila Stark, and Lincoln Stark; her siblings, Patricia (Stuart) MacRobbie and Anthony (Dorothy) Kerst; several nieces and nephews; and countless friends.
Recent stories

A poem mom saved (by D.E. Lee)

Shared by Sean Stewart on September 25, 2022
Do you know who you are,
   and from whence you came?
Do you know where your going ,
   or to you is it all the same?
Do you know your father,
   and his father before him?
Will you know your son,
   or are we just here by whim?
The opportunities you were given,
   by those who went before,
Will you pass them to your children,
   and give them even more?
What will you learn,
   from your father's fathers, son?
Will you just forget,
   all that they have done?
And so forgetting,
   break the binding glue,
And worse than that,
   forget your identity too.



Ode to Mom

Shared by Sean Stewart on September 23, 2022
I first met mom in '59.
I looked in her eyes and she looked in mine,
She sweetly said "you took your time".

She took me home to meet two brothers.
Then went back to the hospital and got two others!
Though one turned out to be a girl, 
- just a tougher brother with hair in curls.

Mom read us stories to spark our dreams,
 of worlds governed by honest queens,
 of fortunes made with magic beans,
 by taking risks - and what that means.

Mom and Dad had love to give.
Five kids and a dog is the way to live!
With just one bathroom to add some glib,
-it wasn't always easy I will not fib.

Dad played it smart and left early each day.
He left mom alone to quell the fray.
"Wait 'till your father gets home!" is all she could say.
Dad would return about 5:00 with a big bouquet,
-to a hot cooked meal and some Tanqueray.

Mom cooked for seven who ate like ten.
She would fill the fridge, then do it again!
Her shopping cart had a tandem pen,
 and our milk was delivered by two burly men!

Mom would often work out her fatigue,
 by knocking down pins for the bowling league.
A 220 average as her team took the win,
 and a record number of broken pins!

Mom taught us how to row our boat,
 to be sincere and honest and never gloat."
To be responsible, and always vote!

We miss our parents, we miss them a lot.
We remember the best, the rest forgot. 
But mom's advise forget I will not:

 "If a friend calls you, return the favor"
 "Don't gulp your food, life is to savor"

 "Say a blessing at dinner, dont forget you are blessed"
 "If you have somthing to say, get it off your chest"

 "Stand straight, don't slouch."
  -" and for heavens sake get off the couch!"

 "If your grouchy, take a nap."
 "And close the fridge, there's water at the tap."