ForeverMissed
Shamdayal Bridj Mohan Sahoy (aka ‘Sam’, ‘Uncle Sam’ ‘Daddy’, ‘Grandad’, ‘Great Grandad’) was born on the 12th of May 1928 and died peacefully on the 21st of April 2020, at the age of 91.

After years of deteriorating health in a long-term care home, Sam died of natural causes at his daughter’s home in Markham, Ontario with his youngest daughter and great granddaughter by his side during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

Sam is survived by four daughters (Yvette, Amelita, Ouveta and Neraun), eight grandchildren (Nalini, Chris, Ellisha, Duane, Kerina, Jason, Justin and Brittney), five great grandchildren (Krystalle, Katherina, Samual, Talia, and Georgia), and two Macaw Parrots (Robb and Coo) which he fostered in Canada. He is preceded in death by his wife, Doreen Sahoy, four siblings and his eldest daughter, Amorette.

Sam’s body was cremated at Highland Hills Crematorium in Gormley, Ontario on the 23rd of April 2020, what would have been his late wife’s 90th birthday. Sam’s only wish was for his children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to accompany him on the day of his cremation. However, due to the global pandemic, family was prohibited from accompanying him on this sad day.

The family joined together in a private vehicle procession which followed Sam’s body in a black SUV from the Highland Funeral Home in Markham, Ontario to the Highland Hills Crematorium in Gormley. The procession was joined by the sounds of Amazing Grace and The Millennium Prayer which played on the stereo systems of six vehicles that followed during the 10 km procession. Unfortunately, no formal service was held due to government-enforced restrictions.

Sam is now studying the subject of ‘Life’ from his Upper Chambers in the Kingdom of Heaven!

We appreciate all the love and support and encourage everyone to share their favourite memories of Sam on this memorial website.


Posted by Jeanette Singh on April 21, 2021
It seems as if you have not gone,but I keep missing you when something from our childhood crosses my mind.
We had some really great times--going to the beach,running behind your bicycle,playing Ludo etc,and I will forever love you and be grateful for all you were able to do to get me going with my education.
Love you forever.
Posted by Jeanette Singh on May 6, 2020
Thank you my Uncle Sam.You taught Robin and me to be the people we grew up to be-loyal,caring,loving,and above all learning everything that was there to investigate and going steps further.You never allowed us to be just students at Aurora school but kept prodding us to be better every day.
Words cannot express all we owe you for creating in us the love of Nature and reading and the values we still cherish and live by.
God "s arms are wide open to receive you and my beautiful aunty , my brother and your brother(my father) are all waiting .
You were a BIG part of my childhood and all the years following.
LOve always UNCLE!
 
Posted by Terry Katchay on May 4, 2020
Dear Yvette, Lita, Ouveta, Neraun,

Our deepest sympathy on the passing of your dad. Please know that our thoughts and prayers are with you all as you heal from his loss. He will forever be alive as you remember and cherish all the many memories that you shared over the years.

Love and prayers from A. Lily and family
Posted by Elizabeth Vieira on April 30, 2020
A person that departs from this earth never truly leaves, for they are still alive in your hearts and minds, and through you, great memories live on. Our heartfelt condolences to everyone, and he will not be forgotten.
Posted by Justin Lee-Own on April 29, 2020
With the same eyes, through different times, I always looked up to you...
As an infant I was fascinated and full of curiosity about you...
As a child I was hypnotized by your presence and captivated by you...
As a young man full of ignorance I sought comfort and enlightenment from you...
As a man full of respect, I was simply in awe of you...

Last week I looked down at you, knowing that it would be the last time that I would see your face.
In that moment of silence I established a communion between us...
Between this world that you had shed yourself of, and the world that, for now, I can only shut my eyes and contemplate...

You taught me that death is a necessary part of the cycle of life...
You taught me to understand it as a transition of the soul from the “here” to the “there”... 
To never spend time worrying about death and to never waste time living in fear of it.

Some of the greatest memories that I will forever hold on to are from the time spent at Shae Court.
Because of you, our youth was super soaked with joyous memories of epic water gun battles...
Our imaginations had no limits as we drove our power wheels around the borders of the cul de sac...
We rode our bicycles as if they were thoroughbred stallions all over the neighborhood...
Climbing the ladder into our tree house for a mini retreat...
We swung so high on our swing set convinced we could touch the sky...
We were probably the only kids on the block who played croquet...
You taught us to never be afraid, yet tales of the creatures in the dark wooden shed kept us away...

The more I reflect on our youth, the more I am amazed by your effort to make all that happen for us.

Grandad, my Sundays have never been the same.

As a young adult you taught me to take responsibility for my actions no matter the consequence.

As a man you taught me to always stay humble in the service of others...
To never apologize for what one must do in order to protect one’s family...

You were a man who saw the world as his oyster and loved his family to the moon and back!

A man who meant different things to many people, but to me, to us your grandchildren, you will always be our Grandad, a provider and our protector.

To the only Grandfather that I ever knew, I thank you for sharing your Light with us and I look forward to the moment that our souls meet again.

Well done Grandad... well done my friend.

Forever Grateful,

Justin
Posted by Barbara Mendes on April 29, 2020
I’m deeply saddened at the news of the passing of Mr. Samuel Sahoy. It was my privilege to grow up knowing Mr. & Mrs Sahoy and their daughters. Indeed he’s left an impressive legacy that will be perpetuated for generations. Everyone can take solace in a life well lived and know he’s at peace and reunited with his beloved Doreen where there’s no more suffering only joy
Posted by Jason Duncan on April 28, 2020
It's hard to put into words how it feels to lose such a great man, My Grandfather, Sam Sahoy. There are two things that were always clear; He loved each and every one of us unconditionally and he always wanted the best for us / for us to want the best for ourselves. The stories told, wisdom shared, and memories created will never be forgotten. Thank you for all you did for us.


Rest in Peace Grandad.
Posted by Jonathan Kramer on April 28, 2020
We offer our condolences for the passing of this accomplished patriarch. During this time of sadness, we pray that God will grant each of you His peace and comfort and that you will remember all the good times together.
Posted by Katherina Sahoy on April 26, 2020
Grandad, it was an honour to be home and have the chance to take care of you this past month. During this experience, I have learned so much and I will forever cherish you in my heart. I know you are always going to be there as my guardian angel to watch over me as well as help me in school. I love you so much and I want to thank you for the blessing, and all of the messages that will help me throughout my career.
You truly are my hero!!
Rest In Peace and forever in my heart
Posted by Samantha Zufelt on April 26, 2020
Dear family,

His great grand daughter, Kat, has been my best friend for a couple years now. Based on our conversations, her love for him has been obvious. He will forever be remembered, and hopefully he is resting peacefully with predeceased family members. Much love <3 my prayers are with his whole family and everyone impacted.
Posted by Annalisa Gafoor on April 26, 2020
Rest in Peace
Posted by Chris Gafoor on April 26, 2020

The world has lost one of the greatest men to have lived in the past century. Sam Sahoy lived an exciting and fulfilling life, one in which only two things had any meaning to him:

1) his immediate family, comprised of his wife, 5 children, 8 grandchildren, and 5 great grandchildren; and 

2) the art and science of justice! 

He will be dearly missed but I know a part of him still lives on inside of us all!

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Jeanette Singh on April 21, 2021
It seems as if you have not gone,but I keep missing you when something from our childhood crosses my mind.
We had some really great times--going to the beach,running behind your bicycle,playing Ludo etc,and I will forever love you and be grateful for all you were able to do to get me going with my education.
Love you forever.
Posted by Jeanette Singh on May 6, 2020
Thank you my Uncle Sam.You taught Robin and me to be the people we grew up to be-loyal,caring,loving,and above all learning everything that was there to investigate and going steps further.You never allowed us to be just students at Aurora school but kept prodding us to be better every day.
Words cannot express all we owe you for creating in us the love of Nature and reading and the values we still cherish and live by.
God "s arms are wide open to receive you and my beautiful aunty , my brother and your brother(my father) are all waiting .
You were a BIG part of my childhood and all the years following.
LOve always UNCLE!
 
Posted by Terry Katchay on May 4, 2020
Dear Yvette, Lita, Ouveta, Neraun,

Our deepest sympathy on the passing of your dad. Please know that our thoughts and prayers are with you all as you heal from his loss. He will forever be alive as you remember and cherish all the many memories that you shared over the years.

Love and prayers from A. Lily and family
his Life

Family Life

Sam Sahoy was born on the 12th of May 1928 in Aurora, Essequibo Coast in Guyana, South America. He had four siblings, met the love of his life, Doreen Paulsingh, at the age of sixteen and married on the 11th of August 1949. Prior to moving to London, England to pursue his dream of becoming a lawyer, he had four children; Amorette, Yvette, Amelita, and Ouveta. A decade later, his fifth and youngest daughter, Neraun, was born.

Over the next 50 years, four of Sam’s daughters had children of their own, which became his prized grandchildren, named Nalini, Chris, Ellisha, Duane, Kerina, Jason, Justin and Brittney.His grandchildren had children of their own which became his precious great grandchildren, named Krystalle, Katherina, Samual, Talia, and Georgia.In addition, Sam has two Macaw Parrots named Robb and Coo, which traveled with him from Guyana and fostered in Canada by him and his youngest daughter.

Sam is preceded in death by his four siblings, his wife Doreen, and his eldest daughter Amorette.


Career Life


In January 1958, Sam boarded a ship bound for London, England to pursue studies at the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple. In April 1960, he graduated as a Barrister-at-Law and was called to both the English Bar and the Guyana Bar a month later in May. Sam was honoured by Her Majesty The Queen Elizabeth II for achieving his LLB in record-setting time whilst supporting four children back home in the Commonwealth of Guyana.


In May 1960, Sam returned to Guyana where he commenced his first practice and appeared in all the various levels of Courts for both contentious and non-contentious matters. Over this eight-year period, he was appointed to a number of prestigious positions within his community: Chairman of the Suddie Hospital Committee, Essequibo (1962); Governor of the Gibson Fischer Government School, Essequibo (1962); Justice of the Peace & Commissioner of the Oaths To Affidavits, Guyana (1964); and Chairman of the Rice Assessment Committee, Guyana (1968)

In 1968, Sam was appointed Magistrate of the Georgetown Judicial District and Magistrate of the Interior Courts; these appointments were considered to be one of the highest in the judicial system, equivalent to a Provincial Superior Court Judge, in Canada, where he would eventually settle with his wife, five daughters, and first granddaughter, Nalini.

Circa 1970, Sam made a difficult decision to emigrate to Canada and leave behind an illustrious career during the chaos of the Forbes Burnham government. Burnham was regarded as a ‘strongman’ who embraced his own version of socialism based on autocratic and nationalistic policies. Burnham ruled Guyana from 1964 until his death in 1985, a period marred by repeated accusations of Afro-supremacy, state-sanctioned violence, electoral fraud, and corruption.

That year, Sam settled in Canada and was employed by numerous corporations as in-house Counsel between 1972 and 1978.And in 1979, he simultaneously attended McGill University and the University of London to complete his studies in law. In 1981, Sam achieved an LLB from both universities and added a Bachelor of Civil Law from McGill University which opened his doors to practicing law in Quebec.

In 1982, Sam was called to the Ontario Bar and subsequently called to the Jamaican Bar in 1984. Between 1982 and 1996, he managed a General Law Practice for Civil, Family, Criminal, Real Estate, and Immigration Law, employing two junior solicitors and a support staff of eight. Sam appeared before the Federal Courts of Canada, Supreme Court of Canada, Ontario Court (General Division), Appellate Courts, and various Administrative Tribunals before closing his practice due to medical reasons.

Throughout his career, Sam held himself and his family to the highest standard of the law, fought against injustices for thousands of clients, and protected their constitutional rights and freedoms. He had a particular enthusiasm for Immigration Law and took on countless Pro-Bono cases for immigrants and refugees fleeing their homeland to start a new life in Canada. This was his way of giving back to the global and local communities in which he served with great pride!

End of Life


Leading up to his final days, whilst living at a long-term care facility in Markham from mid-2018 to 2020, Sam's health and medical condition quickly deteriorated. Sam would sustain regular falls, injuries and bruising to his appendages whilst under the care of the facility.  His family had inquired and made several complaints about the quality of care that Sam and other residents were receiving with the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, but such calls went unanswered.


In February 2020, the news of a global pandemic, COVID-19, swept across Canada and killed thousands of vulnerable senior citizens in long-term care homes. Around the same time, Sam’s immediate family installed a surveillance camera in Sam’s room to monitor his health and safety. Within days, a horrifying discovery had been made; the surveillance camera caught a personal care worker stealing Sam’s evening snack then feeding him the balance using the same spoon she had just used to feed herself, during a time of rapid infection of the COVID-19 virus.

Shortly after, during the lock-down of all long-term care facilities across Canada, the family refused to allow Sam to die alone in what would surely be his death sentence. His family called for immediate action, removing Sam from the long-term care facility on legal grounds, so that he could live out his final days with loving family. Sam was moved from the facility on the 24th of March 2020 and quarantined with his daughter and great granddaughter during the global pandemic, at their residence in Markham, Ontario.

Twenty-eight days later, at approximately 10:45 am on the 21st of April 2020, Sam finally succumbed of natural causes, at the young age of 91. He was not alone, did not suffer, and got the privilege to say ‘goodbye’ to a few members of his immediate family.

At the time of this writing, Covid-19 is responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of senior citizens globally, who never stood a chance to say ‘goodbye’ to anyone.

Sam was a firm believer in Natural Law, inspired by Civil Rights Leader, Mahatma Gandhi, who said::

“There is a higher court than courts of justice and that is the court of conscience. It supercedes all other courts.”

  • Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948)
Recent stories
Shared by Paul Nauth on April 30, 2020
I meet my Uncle Sam for the first time in 1974. I was a "hyperactive" child but, he got me to lie on the sofa with him and watch TV.
I remember the feeling of calm, which was very unusual for me at that time. He is at peace now and will always be remembered.

Grandad

Shared by Krystalle Manikam on April 28, 2020
I wish I was able to see you before you passed ....Even wen you did leave my heart was in shock .....GRANDAD
YOU WERE AN AMAZING FATHER GRANDFATHER UNCLE BROTHER AND GREAT GRANDFATHER TO YOUR FAMILY. ALSO AN AMAZING LAWYER JUDGE AND MENTOR. WORDS CANT EXPLAIN HOW I FEEL RIGHT NOW TO EXPLAIN YOUR GONE. ALL THOSE SPECIAL MEMORIES YOU SHARE WITH OUR WHOLE FAMILY. YOU TAUGHT ME ALOT OF THINGS IN LIFE AND THAT I AM FOREVER GREATFUL ... I REMEMBER WHEN WE FIRST CAME TO LIVE WITH AUNTY NERRY . YOU AND NAN WOULD HELP TAKE CARE OF US . WAIT FOR THE SCHOOL BUS AFTER SCHOOL, YOU USE TO MAKE US HOTDOGS FOR DINNER AND WE USE TO SIT DOWN AND WATCH YOUNG AND THE RESTLESS . WHEN NAN PASSED AWAY I KNOW IT CRUSHED YOUR HEART BUT YOU STAYED THE STRONGEST FOR OUR FAMILY. ALL THE SPECIAL MEMORIES I HAVE WITH YOU WILL BE DEFINITELY CHERISHED FOREVER AND MAKE ME SMILE EACH AND EVERYDAY. IF ONLY I COULD HAVE YOU BACK , JUST FOR A LITTLE WHILE TO TELL YOU I LOVE YOU , AND TO SIT AND TALK JUST LIKE WE USE TO EVERY AFTERNOON . REMEMBER WHEN I USE TO LIVE WITH YOU TO HELP YOU WITH ANYTHING YOU NEEDED . WE USE TO GO FOR WALKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BUILDING. GO GROCERIES AND TIM HORTONS . WE USE TO SAY MANTRAS BEFORE BED , AND WE ALWAYS USE TO CLEAN TOGETHER BECAUSE CLEANLINESS IS NEXT TO GODLINESS. I GUESS I WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER ALL THE SILLY THINGS YOU USE TO SAY TO US *Bowgie gyal a wah yah cook for dinna dhal and alloo choka dish em out and put it pon de table when bhia come he go eat how much he able *or to call the alligators **alligator mama saspon kova*IM SOO SORRY THAT I HAVENT BEEN THERE FOR YOU THESE PAST COUPLE OF YEARS AND HAVENT SEEN YOU IN A WHILE .BUT I HOPE YOU KNOW THAT YOUR THE BEST GREAT GRAND FATHER ANYONE CAN HAVE You drew memories in my mind that I can never erase .The fact that you are no longer here will always bring me pain but your forever in my heart until we meet again. I LOVE YOU dearly 
REST IN PEACE GRANDAD 

Help Support The Advocacy Centre For The Elderly

Shared by Chris Gafoor on April 26, 2020
About Me
My name is Chris Gafoor, and I am the eldest grandson of Shamdayal Bridj Mohan Sahoy, who passed away suddenly, but peacefully with loving-family, on the 21st of April 2020 during the COVID-19 global pandemic. My grandfather was a family-pillar, admired community-figure, and a respected Magistrate, Barrister & Attorney-At-Law across several continents. He was a humanitarian who gave back to his community, in the form of Pro-Bono work, to the most vulnerable groups during his 36-year illustrious career.

I created this Memorial Fundraiser to honour my grandfather’s work in the legal profession by carrying his work forward, and with your help, we can help Canada’s first community legal clinic, ACE, to provide essential legal services to low-income seniors who are greatly affected by "Elder Law" issues.

Please CLICK HERE to support my GoFundMe campaign, on behalf of The Advocacy Centre For The Elderly!

Objectives

I aim to raise a minimum of $12,520, on behalf of the Advocacy Centre For The Elderly (ACE), by the deadline that would have been my grandfather’s 92nd birthday, on the 12th of May 2020.

This Memorial Fund will help low-income seniors, the most vulnerable group in our society, afford legal services, including advice, education, and representation for important issues that affect this group during this global pandemic, some of which include:

  • Residents’ Bill-Of-Rights infringement cases;
  • Problems with hospital admission, detention, or discharge;
  • Abuse, or threats of abuse, whether physical, emotional or financial;
  • Quality of care in Long-Term Care Facilities or other seniors’ residence;
  • Pressure to move out of a retirement home or problems with care services;
  • Inappropriate use of a Power of Attorney provided to a relative or a friend;
  • Money or property taken by someone in a position of trust or authority without proper notification or consent.
In addition, your donation will help ACE to provide law reform, public legal education, and community development activities for seniors’ organizations, health and social services providers, and other groups interested in seniors’ issues. Ultimately, my wish is to contribute to protecting senior residents’ Bill of Rights in long-term care homes. Let’s help the next generation avoid the recent and ongoing tragedies being experienced by our senior citizens.

Please CLICK HERE to support my GoFundMe campaign, on behalf of The Advocacy Centre For The Elderly!

About ACE

The Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE), established in 1984, is a specialty community legal clinic that was organized to provide a range of legal services to low-income seniors in Ontario, Canada.

ACE was originally organized by members of Concerned Friends of Ontario Citizens in Long-Term Care Facilities and included lawyers, community workers, health providers, a small-claims court judge, seniors' activists and other community volunteers. 

ACE is the first community legal clinic in Canada to provide legal services to seniors with a focus on "Elder Law" issues such as health care consent, substitute decision-making, long-term care, community care, retirement home tenancies, consumer protection issues and elder abuse.

ACE receives its primary funding from Legal Aid Ontario, via the Attorney General, but also relies on money received in the form of charitable donations. However, in December 2019, the Attorney General introduced a $133-million cut to legal aid, which was suppose to rise by $31 million by 2021-22.Ultimately, the most vulnerable, low-income seniors, will continue to suffer far into the future unless we step-in to help offset these funding cuts.

Use Of Funds

Your donation, made in ‘Loving Memory Of Sam & Doreen Sahoy’, will be used to provide legal services to low-income seniors, including advice and representation to individual and group clients, public legal education, law reform and community development activities.

If you’re unable to make a charitable donation at this time, we kindly request that you share this campaign with your family and friends on Facebook and Twitter.

100% Tax Deductible

ACE is a registered trade style of the Holly Street Advocacy Centre For The Elderly Inc., which is a registered charity with a charitable number: 106 686 728 RR 0001. Therefore, your donation is 100% Tax-Deductible.

I thank you and I know Sam & Doreen Sahoy would also greatly appreciate your valued contribution.

Please CLICK HERE to support The Centre For The Elderly!