ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Thelma McDaniel, 96 years old, born on September 20, 1923 and passed away on August 24, 2020. We will remember her forever as a wonderful, brilliant and gifted person that will be truly missed by everyone that knew her in life.

Thelma grew up in the borough of Staten Island, New York City.  Though sparsely populated, it was (is) part of one of the world’s most complex and fascinating cities.  Staten Island had many two and three-story houses, with a different family living on each floor.  The apartments were big, however, with a living room, dining room, kitchen, one bathroom, and usually two bedrooms to each floor.

Thelma’s father was Carlous Richardson, born in Somerset, KY and mother, Marie Fasula Richardson Geddes, born in Manhattan NYC.  She had one sister; Barbara Richardson Taylor, who was five years younger.

Memories of Thelma’s early childhood included:   Many neighborhood children to play with, hopscotch, jump rope, roller skating, jacks, and street games like “King of the Hill” and “Red Rover”.  Reading was a passion for Thelma early on.  There was not money to buy books, except for Christmas so many of her books were acquired via the library.  Thelma’s favorite movies were musicals and comedies.

Thelma went to Curtis H.S. on Staten Island and enjoyed Latin, French, drama, and journalism along with field hockey, basketball, and swimming.  Here first job was at Chase National Bank as a page girl making $65.00 a month.

Thelma went to Hunter College in Manhattan and then moved to Maryville College in Maryville, Tennessee in the fall of 1942.  She met Fred and fell in love.  Fred went to the war 1943 during which time Thelma moved to the University of Iowa to finish her degree in Theatre Arts and graduated in 1946.  They married on August 26, 1946 and moved to the Knoxville, TN for Fred to finish his degree at the University of Tennessee.

Thelma (and Fred) have two daughters, Susan and Jamie.  Susan Marie McDaniel (married to Kenneth Hill) was born in Louisville, Kentucky, March 4, 1954 while Fred was a teacher and coach at Ormsby Village, and Thelma worked for the telephone company.  Jamie Ruth McDaniel was born in Louisville, Kentucky on February 21, 1956 and the family moved in the summer of 1956 to Ypsilanti where Fred worked as Assistant Registrar at Eastern Michigan College (now University). Thelma started teaching in the Theater Department at EMU in 1962.

Jacqueline Taylor Downing, Thelma's niece, came to our family to live in 1959 until she was about 17 years old and is one of our family.  Her brother, Carl Taylor, passed away later in life and Thelma missed him greatly.

Thelma retired from EMU in the summer of 1986.  During Retirement Thelma’s passions included spending time with her family, solving New York Times crossword puzzles with ease, writing friends old and new, and keeping up with current events.  Her passion for the theater remained as evidenced by annual trips to the Stratford Festival in Ontario, Canada.

Thelma is survived by her two aforementioned daughters, Susan and Jamie, four grandchildren, and three great grandchildren.  Thelma’s Grandchildren are Michael McDaniel Hodges, born March 6, 1984, married to Tina Chen; Kate McDaniel Hill, born April 29, 1985, married to Chris Dragga;  Sarah Marie Hodges, born April 24, 1986;   Amy McDaniel Hill, born April 1, 1987, married to Charles Cosimini;  Thelma’s Great Grandchildren are Lucca Kenmark Hill Cosimini born July 14, 2017;  Sofia Chen Hodges born March 1, 2019;  Leo Angelo Hill Cosimini born January 15, 2020;  Jacqueline Taylor Downing, Niece.

Thelma Louise McDaniel died in her sleep on August 24, 2020 at 4:10am at the home of her youngest daughter, Jamie, in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Two days short of her wedding anniversary and 28 days from her 97th birthday.


Posted by Jamie Hodges on September 20, 2020
We are Tina Chen’s father (Xinhua), mother (Junxiu) and grandma (Yonghua) in Houston. We met Thelma the first time at her Ann Arbor home in July 2017, while attending Mike and Tina’s wedding. We were very happy to see each other and we had a great time chatting. At the wedding, Thelma and Yonghua, signed off the wedding document for Mike and Tina. That historical moment has been engraved in our hearts. Her soft voice and the smiles are always remembered. We miss Thelma!
Posted by Patricia Zimmer on September 20, 2020
Today, in celebration of Thelma's birthday and my retirement from EMU, Shari Lyon, a 1980's EMU alum, and I had a long FaceTime chat. We spoke with great love about how much Thelma meant to us. I was one of the fortunate ones who got to work with Thelma at EMU from 1980 until her retirement. What a wonderful colleague she was! In the years after her retirement, we stayed in touch and she became a dear friend to my husband, Dennis, and me.  Her encouragement, humor, love and support have meant so much to us. And the cards and letters! Those meant the world. Dear Thelma, how I wish that I could be celebrating my retirement with you! You were there with me from the start and all along, lifting me up and giving me strength to keep going. Thinking of you today with love and gratitude.
Posted by Amy Hill Cosimini on September 20, 2020
My natural tendency whenever I write something is to think of it as a scholarly paper. I search for an overarching question, and then, after much research, land on a thesis that will specifically answer this question. However, when confronted with the questions: How do you remember Gramma Danny? Who was Gramma Danny to you? I struggle with coming up with a singular argument. She meant too many things to me and to others, and I was fortunate enough to have over 30 years of memories of her. So, instead of developing one cohesive conclusion about Gramma, I leave here a jumbled outline of thoughts, memories and emotions that I associate with my unstoppable Gramma Danny.
• Gramma Danny was firm in her beliefs and always willing to defend them. This is a trait I shared with her. When we agreed, we could talk for hours about the intricacies of the issue; When we disagreed, we would debate for hours with the same passion. I fondly remember our last debate about what types of degrees are required to be a college professor in 2016.
• Gramma Danny had the most amazing laugh. Her laugh could fill a room. Whether she was playing a game with her grandchildren (anyone remember the Star Wars game?) or chuckling “Oh Beverley” as she spoke on the phone to her dear friend. She also knew how to laugh at herself, a rare trait today.
• Gramma Danny was fiercely independent. She treasured being able to be self-sufficient and take care of herself and her own needs.
• Gramma Danny was a life-long learner. I fondly recall her learning multiple languages after her retirement. You could always hear her practicing her conjugations in Spanish, Italian and Latin. She would pepper her conversations with words from these languages, before stopping and asking, “Wait, what language am I using now?”
• Gramma Danny was an equal-opportunity food-dunker. I will always remember her drinking tea with milk and dunking literally anything she was eating into said tea. While this was also the topics of one of our most frequent debates, she always remained true to her food-dunking ways.
• Gramma Danny was an avid player of crossword puzzles. As I child, I was in awe of her ability to decipher crossword puzzle clues and immediately know the answers. I am still in awe. I fondly remember one road trip when Gramma and I spent hours deciphering crosswords, yelling far too loudly about our answers. We were quickly reminded of this by my father, who was trying to drive through the Rocky Mountains as we were screaming “Oh what about “ere”?!”
• Gramma Danny adored her great grandchildren. I remember her meeting my oldest son, Lucca, for the first time. She played with him, snuggled with him, and laughed at all of his antics. It did not matter how tired she was, Gramma Danny was always ready to have visit from her great grandchildren (whether in person or virtually).

As I am adverse to writing conclusions as that denotes an end, I will simply say this.
Gramma: I am better for having had you in my life. I admire you—even when we questioned each other, I love you, and I miss you. Te admiro. Te amo. Te extraño.

-- The fourth grandkid (Amy)
Posted by Millie Chen on September 20, 2020
I met Thelma when I came to visit Michigan 3-4 years ago. It was so wonderful to spend time with her! When I saw her again, it was during Michael’s and Tina’s wedding, then in photos with her great granddaughter, Sofia. In every instance, she brought joy to everyone around her. I am so glad to have met her, and even more touched by the impact she has made on so many of us. She will be missed.
Posted by GAIL MASON on September 15, 2020
I met Thelma 63 or 64 years ago...when I was one or two, and the Crane family moved from the home of Eastern Illinois University to Eastern Michigan University. I lived in Ypsi from 1-6 1/2. During this time I met the whole McDaniel family, and Jaime and Susan became my first best friends...Jamie was a year younger, and Susan was a year older. Of course, we got along great--our mothers were best friends...and remained so for the rest of their lives, even though we moved back to EIU in 1961. And the McDaniel's bought our house on North Wallace. Not only that, but they bought it on contract, meaning my parents received a check every month from the McDaniel's. But we also visited, and I was thrilled to see that my dad's wall mural in the basement was not painted over :).

Mom (Mathiel Crane) and Thelma met at a Dame's Luncheon. At the time (1956, I assume) EMU held a luncheon for all "faculty wives." That's because the faculty were men. They met on the porch or balcony of the president's house because THEY NEEDED TO SMOKE. That's how they met...going for a smoke. Mom and Thelma became fast friends, and that meant my childhood memories include Thelma and her family.

In 1997, the year before my mom died, I was fortunate enough to accompany Mom, Thelma, and three other friends to London for several days. I was 42 at the time, and perhaps the greatest gift of all from that trip, was learning just how funny this group of women were! The laughter! The stories! I didn't realize that old women could be so funny! (Now that I AM one, I understand). Those ladies made trips to the liquor store almost every day! And we saw so much theatre. I chose to go see the Phantom of the Opera by myself while Thelma and the group saw Shakespeare :). Spending time with Thelma was like spending time with my mom. I loved it.

I've tried to stay in touch with Thelma over the last 20 years. Thanks to Jaime for hosting me, and sharing Thelma with me. I love her laugh, I love her soul, I love her politics. We always had a great time together. She often spoke of her love for me, and her love of my mom. I am so very grateful to have had her in my life.

I may be wrong about this, but I heard that in the Jewish faith, the idea of the afterlife has to do with how long people talk about you. In other words, you "live" as long as you are remembered. I will never forget this friendly, energetic, cat-loving, people-loving complicated woman who loved me unconditionally. I know her family feels the same way. Thelma is truly one-of-a-kind. I can hear her say, "Oh, Gail," because she would want to refute this. No can do, Thelma. You are special. I love you. Rest in peace, and tell mom how much I miss her.

Posted by Robin Nott on September 1, 2020
Dear Family,
Blessings to you all, as you care for each other through Thelma's passing. My time with Thelma began through the graduate program at EMU, which I attended from 1982-1984. My work with Thelma, Ginny, and Patricia was clearly a life-changing experience, playing a key role in defining my own future 35 year career in drama/theatre education. Thelma's spirited, inspiring, and dedicated presence provided a role model in the field, and lots of laughs along the way. Thelma's life brings to mind a favorite quote form Marshal McCluhan, "We become what we behold." For so many of us who passed through the halls of Quirk Theatre, Thelma helped this come true in our lives. Thelma helped make the world a better place, by inspiring a generation of arts educators.
Posted by Carla Uphaus on September 1, 2020
Thelma definitely left an impression on anyone that crossed paths with her. I always felt like Jamie was so lucky to get “the cool Mom.”  Thelma was the type of woman that people strive to be - welcoming, smart, strong, funny, adventurous, quick to smile and laugh (I loved her laugh!). The world would be such a better place with more Thelmas in it. 
No matter how many years would go by between visits it was always easy to just pick up where we left off. Her love for her family was so apparent. She lived such a full life and I am so glad her family was left with such warm memories. Cheers Thelma!
Posted by Kate Hill on September 1, 2020
I don't know what to say. Grandma was an elemental force that shaped me so deeply that I likely never will know exactly how and what I got from her. She showed me that being a passionate, intelligent, strong, opinionated woman was a good thing,a thing to be proud of, a thing to celebrate. She encouraged my imagination and my love of reading, taking joy and fostering my play and my stories and my dreams. She kept the family together, making sure that my sister Amy and I got to spend quality time with my cousins Mike and Sarah, who became my best friends growing up.  Her laugh could fill a house, as could her singing, which she did often as most things reminded her of a song (My sister and I once had a contest to see if we could stump Grandma Danny by saying a word she couldn't think of a song for, I believe we lost). She also welcomed my husband Chris in with open arms, and made sure he was fully part of the family. I love her so much, and I know I will adjust and write more when I process more, but here is what I wrote on Facebook as well to explain her to my friends...

My Grandma Danny was an amazing soul. She was the matriarch of the family, holding us together. She had an easy extroversion that made you feel alive when talking to her. She had one of the sharpest wits of anyone, and never was afraid of learning new things-she jumped on facebook and email and new technology with little fear. She had a huge imagination, and was a groundbreaking leader in Children's Theater (yes I come from three generations of actors). She believed in living life with passion, with emotion, with authenticity. She once told us that she didn't want to ever live at any kind of retirement community because "it is full of old people", by which she meant people who were afraid of change. She was a dedicated democrat/progressive (First question about Chris Dragga when I got engaged to him "Is he a good democrat?"), secular humanist, crossword puzzle solver, proud New Yorker, wine and scotch aficionado, and lover of animals, especially her cats. She made the world a richer place. I am so grateful to have had her as my grandma, and know that she will always shape who I am.

Grandma, I love you more than I can ever put into words. Thank you for making me me, and making this world a better place.

-The second grandkid (Kate)
Posted by Pamela Rooks on August 31, 2020
Thelma was one of a kind. She was a wonderful woman, brimful of heart, soul, intelligence, moxie. Her smile lit up the world, and she had the best laugh I ever heard. She enriched the lives of so many over the years -- family and friends, students, children who saw her plays . . . everyone who had the joy of knowing her. She leaves a large gap in this sad world. We will always miss her, but always be glad to have had her in our lives. Rest in power.
Posted by Anne Marie Offer on August 30, 2020
Jamie and Susan,

 Your mom was one of the bright lights in my life and always believed in me and how I showed up in the world. Thanks for sharing her with so many that she supported like a mom, Please send my sympathy to Susan too don't have her contacts.

Hope you know how much  your care meant to your mom and all of us. Thanks for all your care. Blessings to you. I feel your mom every day with me during this covid time as I work with children of the  1st responders and  all the creativity that seems to get activated with and for these little ones I feel it's your mom's encouragement in college that is reignited and the sense of play she encouraged. Forever in my heart and inspiring me Thelma.

Love,

Anne Marie
Posted by Ken Hill on August 30, 2020
Thank you Thelma for letting me be part of your life. By raising a wonderful daughter, Susan, you gave me the best gift anyone could have. After college, I surprised Susan by showing up one night at the theatre at Stratford, Canada. I was camping in a rain-soaked pup tent on the Stratford fairgrounds, and you and Susan convinced Fred to let me into the camper. He was a bit worried about me, but the two of you prevailed, as you always did! From there on, I was part of the camping trips, the theatre trips, the Sunday morning breakfasts, and the joy of the McDaniel family. From that Stratford trip to the time you, Susan, and I traveled across England in 2012, it was always an adventure. Rest easy knowing that the legacy of love you gave to Susan, Kate, Amy, and me will last forever.
Posted by Sarah Hodges on August 29, 2020
To Grandma,

You were the best and most original grandma there ever was. You laughed danced and sang with us. You and Poppy were such a big part of my life and I am forever grateful.

You took Mike and I everywhere in the summer. We had such wonderful trips together and you and Poppy were always such fun to be around! And when mom came with us it was even better. I loved spending Christmas and anytime we could be at your place on Tamiami Trail. I loved that house and I loved being with you. I will have such fond memories of swimming in the pool and playing shuffleboard. Going to the beach to build sandcastles and swimming in the ocean and walking the beach with you and Poppy.

You and Poppy also made it possible for the four grand kids to be so close when we were kids. Then as I got older and Poppy passed away you still took me to go see Kate and Amy every summer and the three of us became like sisters.

So Cheers to T. McD! The best grandma I could ask for! You will always be in my heart.

-Sarah
The 3rd grandchild
Posted by Linda Laundra on August 28, 2020
The best house guest a person could ever hope for, Thelma taught me how to be a real New Yorker. Every morning in the rocking chair, reading the paper or working the puzzle and reviewing her schedule for the day. She was up before us and often out after we went to bed. She hit the pavement running. She enjoyed every inch of Manhattan; especially the theatres, of course, visiting old friends, great food, even the public transportation. Thelma was a treasure. How I wish I had taken her class at Eastern, but I soaked up her creative spirit every chance I got. We looked forward to her visits and wish she could have come more often. Her radiant smile and beautiful energy linger to this day. A true theatre spirit; she guided so many and reminded us to play. She will be missed, but may she join that great cast in the beyond. 
Posted by Susan Hill on August 28, 2020
I will miss Mom for the rest of my life. She was my mother and my friend. We enjoyed doing so many things together throughout our lives. This gave us a special closeness. We shared so many things. We shared our love of family, our love of theatre and the arts, our love of nature, and our love of justice and integrity.

I am so happy she was able to be at the weddings of my daughters and to meet one of her great-grandsons. I am fortunate that I could spend weeks at a time with her in the last few years. I loved just being in her company. We were so comfortable together.

Mom delighted in her family. She loved us all so much. She still does, and we love her forever.
Posted by Roz Brumfield on August 28, 2020
Thelma McDaniel was my mothers friend and during the course of being an adolescent and young adult she and her family became my friends.  It was her warmth, laughter, engaging manner of living and loving which drew me close to her.
What I loved most was Thelma's voice, both literally and figuratively. The way and the words she spoke, her expressiveness, and the sound of her was a constant attraction for being with her.
I hoped as an adult I would be like her. She was my Collen Dewhurst. May she and her family know her voice remains inside me and I can still hear her.
Posted by Jamie Hodges on August 27, 2020
If people want to donate please do so to:

Koste/McDaniel Drama/Theatre for the Young Scholarship Fund
Https://www.emich.edu/foundation/give/index.php?fund=01833

 
Posted by Lori Fredericks on August 27, 2020
Yep. A toast to Thelma !! I loved those happy hour cocktails, sitting on Jamie's back porch(es) when Thelma would come and visit and later on, to live. 
I feel very lucky to have had a person like her in my life and know, so many people have the same feelings.  Her feisty, hearty laugh, her knowledge base, her ability to be in any group of people and be comfortable and the never forgetting impression she left on anyone who was lucky enough to hang with her.  Politics, world events, religion, movies, books, writing, fashion.....she was a very interesting and enjoyable girl. Thelma in a beret and scarf and boots to go out on fall and winter days? That girl could "rock" those beret's. 
We're all going to miss her and Jamie, as my friend, I know you'll be sad and that hole in you heart sticks around always, but many, many memories and stories to remember and tell forever, helps. Cheers to Thel-Bel. We'll have to hit the porch again, soon. My heart goes out to all of the family.    Lori
Posted by Fred Keating on August 27, 2020
THELMA’S POEM

Oh, Sweet Thelma! What ARE you doing?
Leaving all your pals here boo-ing and hoo-ing
COVID, cowards, bullies and Brexit!
A sensible time … for a timely exit.

But, oh, the legacy you leave behind!
You romantic girl with an NYC mind!

You excited example of a life well done.
With humongous heart and love of fun
With energy and empathy your course has run
From Staten Isle winters to Florida sun!

But your legacy, Thel! What you did. What you left.
Aside from family and students bereft
That love and light can conquer all
From home and classroom and rehearsal hall.

It’s ALL rehearsal, you would say
So spread your wings and fly away!
And so we did … and so we do
But gather now to honor you

You taught us to share your love of play
You’re in our hearts and there you’ll stay.

With affection and respect
The “other” Fred
Posted by Jamie Hodges on August 27, 2020
Mom,
I love you and will miss you so much. 
I will write more but wanted to say how much you mean to me and your family. You are everything to us and we will always have the best memories of you as a mom, grandmother and great grandmother.
A toast to Thelma!!
Remember to eat half of a banana.
Love you,
Jamie

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Jamie Hodges on September 20, 2020
We are Tina Chen’s father (Xinhua), mother (Junxiu) and grandma (Yonghua) in Houston. We met Thelma the first time at her Ann Arbor home in July 2017, while attending Mike and Tina’s wedding. We were very happy to see each other and we had a great time chatting. At the wedding, Thelma and Yonghua, signed off the wedding document for Mike and Tina. That historical moment has been engraved in our hearts. Her soft voice and the smiles are always remembered. We miss Thelma!
Posted by Patricia Zimmer on September 20, 2020
Today, in celebration of Thelma's birthday and my retirement from EMU, Shari Lyon, a 1980's EMU alum, and I had a long FaceTime chat. We spoke with great love about how much Thelma meant to us. I was one of the fortunate ones who got to work with Thelma at EMU from 1980 until her retirement. What a wonderful colleague she was! In the years after her retirement, we stayed in touch and she became a dear friend to my husband, Dennis, and me.  Her encouragement, humor, love and support have meant so much to us. And the cards and letters! Those meant the world. Dear Thelma, how I wish that I could be celebrating my retirement with you! You were there with me from the start and all along, lifting me up and giving me strength to keep going. Thinking of you today with love and gratitude.
Posted by Amy Hill Cosimini on September 20, 2020
My natural tendency whenever I write something is to think of it as a scholarly paper. I search for an overarching question, and then, after much research, land on a thesis that will specifically answer this question. However, when confronted with the questions: How do you remember Gramma Danny? Who was Gramma Danny to you? I struggle with coming up with a singular argument. She meant too many things to me and to others, and I was fortunate enough to have over 30 years of memories of her. So, instead of developing one cohesive conclusion about Gramma, I leave here a jumbled outline of thoughts, memories and emotions that I associate with my unstoppable Gramma Danny.
• Gramma Danny was firm in her beliefs and always willing to defend them. This is a trait I shared with her. When we agreed, we could talk for hours about the intricacies of the issue; When we disagreed, we would debate for hours with the same passion. I fondly remember our last debate about what types of degrees are required to be a college professor in 2016.
• Gramma Danny had the most amazing laugh. Her laugh could fill a room. Whether she was playing a game with her grandchildren (anyone remember the Star Wars game?) or chuckling “Oh Beverley” as she spoke on the phone to her dear friend. She also knew how to laugh at herself, a rare trait today.
• Gramma Danny was fiercely independent. She treasured being able to be self-sufficient and take care of herself and her own needs.
• Gramma Danny was a life-long learner. I fondly recall her learning multiple languages after her retirement. You could always hear her practicing her conjugations in Spanish, Italian and Latin. She would pepper her conversations with words from these languages, before stopping and asking, “Wait, what language am I using now?”
• Gramma Danny was an equal-opportunity food-dunker. I will always remember her drinking tea with milk and dunking literally anything she was eating into said tea. While this was also the topics of one of our most frequent debates, she always remained true to her food-dunking ways.
• Gramma Danny was an avid player of crossword puzzles. As I child, I was in awe of her ability to decipher crossword puzzle clues and immediately know the answers. I am still in awe. I fondly remember one road trip when Gramma and I spent hours deciphering crosswords, yelling far too loudly about our answers. We were quickly reminded of this by my father, who was trying to drive through the Rocky Mountains as we were screaming “Oh what about “ere”?!”
• Gramma Danny adored her great grandchildren. I remember her meeting my oldest son, Lucca, for the first time. She played with him, snuggled with him, and laughed at all of his antics. It did not matter how tired she was, Gramma Danny was always ready to have visit from her great grandchildren (whether in person or virtually).

As I am adverse to writing conclusions as that denotes an end, I will simply say this.
Gramma: I am better for having had you in my life. I admire you—even when we questioned each other, I love you, and I miss you. Te admiro. Te amo. Te extraño.

-- The fourth grandkid (Amy)
her Life

Thelma McDaniel 
grew up in Staten Island New York and received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Iowa in 1946 with a major in the Dramatic Arts. She earned her MA from Eastern Michigan University in 1964 with an emphasis in elementary education, and joined the faculty of EMU in 1961 in the then named Department of Speech and Dramatic Arts. McDaniel worked to help develop outreach programs within the Theatre of the Young program, which has lead to productions touring into areas schools and community centers every year since 1968. She also wrote and directed a number of touring productions, which include:  Let's Go Movin' On, Rain, Wind and Sun Tales, A Magic To Do, and  All One. She also wrote play adaptations to  The Wind in the Willows and  Little Women, which both premiered as mainstage productions. In 1980, McDaniel collaborated with Dr. Sandra McClellan of the Department of Special Education to design a developmental drama program for mentally impaired adults that utilized simple dramatic exercises of sound, sense and movement. The program was made possible by McDaniel's Faculty Research Fellowship and McClennan's sabbatical leave. She retired from EMU in 1986, but remained active in children's theatre at the state, national, and international level, with particular involvement in the American Alliance for Theatre Education, the National Drama and Therapy Association, and the International Amateur Theatre Association. She is the recipient of the prestigious Creative Drama for Human Awareness Award presented by the American Alliance for Theatre Education.

This is from 
https://caine.emich.edu/archives/findingaids/html/Drama_and_Theatre_for_the_Young_program_records.html#ref1065

I was working on publishing Thelma's works and did finish one that is sold on Amazon.com
"Wind, Rain and Sun Tales"



Love you Thelma!

The Three C's - Written by Thelma McDaniel

Comfortable -
Memories of my mother and grandmother who encouraged me to play and make up stories and act out the stories.  It was the kind of playing that emphasized the process.  I was early on involved in the process.  The doing, the drama of living, the playing, the "brainstorming" were given as much chance as the product, the play whatever I did could always be nurtured and allowed to grow. 

Cooperative -  
Spirits in my life.  I remember how I wanted to believe Robert Browning's version of heaven in his poem, Andrea del Sarto.

Catalyst - 
This also follows that my mom and grandmother who were catalysts.  I was inspired towards a life of love, adventure and high ideals.  I keep working at what I know.  If I had several lifetimes, I'd still need more.
Recent stories

September 20th

Shared by Jamie Hodges on September 20, 2020
Today would have been Thelma's 97th birthday.  As I think back, my memories of mom keep coming back to me.   For a women born in 1923, she became a very vocal supporter for women's rights during the Equal Rights Amendment movement.  As I look at pictures - current and in the past -  I am so proud of my mom.

Happy Birthday Mom, Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Thelma!!!!
Your family loves and misses you so much.

My Mom

Shared by Jamie Hodges on September 5, 2020
As you know I had the honor of having Thelma (mom/gram) live with me for about 5 or six years.  She did have to go to a assisted living facility when I could not leave her home alone any longer.  When COVID-19 hit I was lucky enough to work at home and so I brought mom home to live with me again.  The company I work for for 14 years decided I did not fit in with them any longer so that was so much easier as I had more time to be with mom.  She was my biggest fan and always supported me with encouragement and love.  I miss walking in the house and telling her what I did and getting all the support and "great job" from her.  I will never forgot how lucky I was to have this time with her.  It was hard but now that I look back it was the best thing for both of us.  

I miss you mom, so much.
Love Jamie