ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Adetokunbo Lucas 89 years old, born on November 25, 1931 and passed away on December 25, 2020. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Adetinoye Olushina on January 21, 2021
Decades of friendship

Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas was a very good friend of my late dad, Dr. George Oladipo Ogunmekan. As the story goes on the 1st of March, 1949, ‘m.v. APAPA' moved from Lagos port at Apapa on its way to Liverpool, England. It took 13 days to reach its destination stopping in Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Las Palmas. My dad and Mr. Lucas, at that time, were on their way to the most important step in their career. Both were going to study medicine at the University of Durham, England. They spent the first three months in Norwich at the City College. The short stay in Norwich helped them adapt to the temperature, food, and other local features of their new environment.

They both started the medical course in Newcastle in September 1949. The six-year course passed remarkably quickly. Their classmates included half a dozen West African students, among whom were Prof. Lucas’s late cousin, Dr. Taiwo Oluwole, and the late Dr. Dele Odulate. My dad, Dr. G.O. Ogunmekan graduated in 1955 while Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas graduated the following year because he had taken an extra course in physiology. In addition to the hard work in going through the curriculum, the period laid the foundation of a warm friendship between Prof. Lucas and my dad, Dr. G.O. Ogunmekan – a friendship that lasted 7 decades!

This is an adaptation of the Tribute written by Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas during the burial service of my dad who passed away on the 12th of January 2018

May his soul rest in perfect peace, Mrs. Adetinoye Olushina
Posted by Lars Gustafsson on January 19, 2021
Dear Lucas family and friends!

I met Adetokunbo once. It was a memory for life. In november 1991 he came travelling to Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm to instruct me and my colleague, the late Björn Lindström, on our mission to Ibadan and Accra. We were both young scientists recruited by professor Folke Sjöqvist to evaluate and guide TDR on decisions regarding clinical pharmacology research strengthening in the two universities. It was amazing that he trusted us. His visionary ideas on tropical research and his friendly mind made our mission unforgettable. He convinced us about the importance and implications of TDR-related research and development. For the past 50 years tropical clinical pharmacology research and training has been a major interest of mine. I am so glad that I have met him and so sorry that it was not feasible to meet Adetonkunbo when visiting and lecturing in Lagos in November 2019. I know that Dr Lucas had many ties with the late Sune Bergström and they worked nicely together. I have been told by a friend of mine, Dr Lennart Freij, that once visiting Stockholm Adetokunbo asked for a possibility to play on an organ. Dr Bergström arranged it and he was playing for Lennart Freij and Sune Bergström in Stockholm Concert Hall, where the Nobel Prize Ceremony takes place normally. Adetonkbu was a great scientist and a great person that I will remember for ever. 
Thank you
Lars L Gustafsson
Professor MD
Karolinska Institutet
Stockholm Sweden
Posted by nike arowobusoye on January 17, 2021
Thank you is a word, an emotion, a state of being and can be an adjective. It is something we express but never often enough. We stand of the shoulders of our quiet heroes, they have a huge impact on our lives and their reverberations echo and unfold silently. Professor Lucas was one of the heroes in my adult life and career. I reached out at the very start of my public health journey and asked for a reference to LSHTM. Professor Lucas gave me one, supported and encouraged me as needed, challenged the unconscious bias shown by LSHTM, never interfered in my decisions and did not expect anything in return..not even a thank you. Of course I did express my gratitude. I intermittently informed him with a grateful heart of my milestones over the years. I wish that I had made an effort to let him know more often how ever so grateful I was, how I learnt a lot from his actions over the years, and how proud l am to be able to say I knew him. As I continue my work in Public Health..I celebrate Prof and remain every grateful. I applaud you Sir, Rest in perfect peace IJMN.
Dr Nike Arowobusoye
Posted by Jumoke Ibidapo on January 16, 2021
It is difficult to put into words what Prof Adetokunbo Lucas meant to a wide range of people. He would be warmly remembered for his extremely gentle disposition. He was a consummate public health physician, teacher, mentor and he cared so deeply for all. He will be missed for the person he was to me. A father. Rest in perfect peace.
Posted by Afetame Alabi on January 11, 2021
TRIBUTE TO GRANDPA LUCAS

I will always cherish the moments we spent together during our decade-long acquaintance. Prior to the start of both my undergraduate and postgraduate studies at the University of Ibadan, you opened your doors to me and treated me like I were your grandson. The roles you played in my graduation ceremony and in helping to secure on-campus accommodation for my postgraduate studies will never be forgotten.

Our long discussions were always enjoyable and insightful. The breadth and depth of your knowledge on various subjects never ceased to amaze me, and I have always insisted to people that you are one of the most brilliant people I've had the pleasure of meeting. Your strong work ethic even in your advanced years is something that I continue to aspire to.

As you enjoy your eternal rest, I am certain that you will have, in the words of one of your favourite books, "the best of times".    
Posted by Dr Ibitein Okeafor on January 10, 2021
Adieu Distinguished Prof Adetokunbo Lucas

Amidst the pain of your departure, your outstanding global impact speaks volumes and gives comfort. Thank you for leaving the world in a much better place than you saw it. As a public health physician and also a recipient of the prestigious Adetokunbo Lucas Award, you are forever my inspiration.

The Lord comfort the entire family and also the academic community. May his legacies of love, care, great mentoring, and giving his very best to the world live on through us to the glory of God!

Sleep in the Lord's bossom dear exceptional teacher and professor per excellence!

Dr Ibitein N. Okeafor
Posted by Tokunbo Oluwole on January 10, 2021
Tribute to my beloved Uncle, Professor Adetokunbo O. Lucas O. F. R.

Uncle it's such a privilege to be related to an icon, a trail blazer who left giant foot prints, a role model for all generations, an international celebrity, a man for all seasons.
Thank you Uncle for being you.
Many who related to you also knew the other side of you. The kind, caring, loving, large hearted, God fearing father and grandfather.
My earliest recollection of you was at UCH, Ibadan, when I was about 4years old. We all lived in close proximity to each other in those early days in the beautiful serene Hospital setting.
You were so loving and caring that I bonded to you and Aunty Kofo immediately. So much so that in at least in 2 occasions when I got angry and frustrated with my own mother and then Aunty Toro, I would pack a little bag and tell them I'm going to walk up the hill to my uncle's house and live with him because I wasn't going to live with my mother anymore.
Thank you again Uncle for being you.
The first and only time to date when I visited Geneva was during your days with the WHO and you made sure I had a wonderful visit.
We Praise Jesus for beautiful memories of you. I pray that your children would be even greater than you.
Rest in Perfect Peace Uncle, till we meet again at Jesus feet. Amen.
Posted by Ayodeji Oluleye on January 9, 2021
TRIBUTE TO PROFESSOR ADETOKUNBO LUCAS
We before I met Professor Lucas, I had read and heard so much about him. Anytime, I read about WHO in the news, I always thought we were being well represented. Our first meeting was at a University of Ibadan retreat. We were all holed up for 3 days. The purpose was related to the UI visioning process and strategic plan. Before starting my paper, I gave an anecdote about life. During the break time, he wanted to know more of what I was trying to convey. We exchanged phone numbers and I promised to visit him in Ibadan. I visited as promised, and while waiting for what I thought would be a round of drinks, he excused himself. He went to his room and arrived with a projector. He requested for one hour of my time. He gave me a lecture on life with slides. The lecture related to everything under the sun – healthcare, philosophy, religion, gender and several other genres. I saw life as interdependent and all weaved into one. It occurred to me that life was so simple, yet so tough. It was an eye opening experience. After that, we had drinks with him regaling me with his early career life and several jokes - all bringing a window on the world. He made such an impression on me. I was grateful to have met an educated man with an educated mind. May his gentle soul rest in peace. Amen.
Professor Ayodeji Oluleye
Posted by Olufunmilayo Alabi on January 8, 2021
TRIBUTE TO MY GODPAPA
My close relationship with you dates back to 1968 when I gained admission to International School, University of Ibadan. You and aunty became my legal guardians, a role you both played with so much love and joy that to this day I consider you my second parents. You extended your love to my son , Afetame, in his University of Ibadan days, playing the role of legal guardian and grandpa.

As an ISI student I spent my long weekends with your family and always felt at home. I recall informing you and my parents of my confirmation exactly a week before the day. Not only were you present physically, you had a ram slaughtered for your Goddaughter and arranged a lavish reception with more than half of the ISI boarders present.

On 7th September, 1991 you walked me up the aisle and gave me away in marriage, thus making it possible for my daddy to join Philip and I in Holy wedlock. You flew in with Aunty from the USA to honour my request. What show of love! 

In 2010 you communicated daily from the UK with the surgeon who operated on my husband, monitoring his progress for 5 weeks until it pleased God to call him home. You were one in a million.

I will miss your birthday calls and lively conversations but will forever cherish the memories of your unalloyed love towards Afetame and me.

Rest peacefully in the bosom of your Creator.
Olufunmilayo Alabi
(Your Goddaugter)
Posted by Olaitan Soyannwo on January 7, 2021
Prof Lucas was a great teacher and advisor. He made public health so interesting in my undergraduate days in early 1970s at the University of Ibadan that I still remember some of his areas of emphasis as I moved on in my career from management of pain in surgery to palliative care in the community. My husband and I cherish the sessions of piano music in his house. Rest in Peace our dear Prof.
Posted by Emeritus Prof. Yetunde Me... on January 4, 2021
Emeritus Professor Adetokunbo Lucas
My teacher at the University of Ibadan.
What else shall I say about all I have been privileged to experience and know about your life both within and outside Academia?
Splendid Prof! Splendid Prof!! Absolutely Splendid Prof!!!
May this be the verdict of God Almighty whose final judgement is all that matters.
"His master replied, 'Good job! You're a good and faithful servant! You proved that you could be trusted with a small amount. I will put you in charge of a large amount. Come and share your master's happiness.' (Mat 25:23)
(GOD'S WORD Translation)

Emeritus Prof. Yetunde Mercy Olumide
Posted by Iyabo Onipede on January 2, 2021
He was a good friend and mentor. He helped me so much with his humor and wisdom. He cherished his friends and loved me unconditionally. I will miss him. Until we meet again. A true elder and father.
Posted by David Devlin-Foltz on December 30, 2020
What a privilege it was to work for Dr. Lucas as a young member of the grantmaking staff at the Carnegie Corporation of New York in the late 1980s.
His beaming smile and booming laugh encouraged me and charmed even the grantseekers to whom he had to deliver disappointing news - sometimes in the form of an African fable or proverb to soften the blow. A giant has left us.
Posted by Ayo Bamgbose on December 30, 2020
Professor Adetokunbo Lucas, Former Professor and Head of the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Ibadan (UI) who passed away on Christmas Day 2020 was one of the most distinguished and erudite scholars UI has had the fortune of adorning its academic staff. Since his demise was announced, a lot of well-deserved tributes have been paid to this giant global health guru. As for me, I will limit myself to my knowledge and acquitance of him at UI. As Professors, we lived together on Saunder's Road and our families interacted with each other very well. It is no surprise then that when I called to give my condolences to his widow, she asked after my children even by name.
Prof. Lucas was a versatile man of many interests. He once came to me in my office to present a proposal about the need for medical students to have a working knowledge of the dominant language they would encounter in doctor-patient interaction. It is well-known that getting a third-party to interpret is not really without its problems. Hence he, as a doctor, and I, as a linguist, worked together on Yoruba expressions for consultation with patients. Because of the rigid nature of the curriculum, not much came out of this initiative. However, recent efforts to add a language component to the medical curriculum appear to be gaining momentum.
The reverse of this collaboration was when a student of mine was looking for materials on the broadcasts of Chief S.L. Akintola, former Premier of Western Region. Owing to the political turbulence that accompanied the 1966 military coup, those in whose custody the official recordings were either deliberately or mistakenly destroyed them. It was a great surprise for us to discover that Professor Lucas had recorded some of these broadcasts and he graciously made the recordings available for the student's research.
Many lecturers in UI may not be aware that Professor Lucas was one of the pioneers of the use of power point for public lectures. While, for most lecturers, giving a lecture meant standing at a podium and reading from a script, Prof. Lucas showed the way to an interesting and delightful visual presentation.
One day I was at the Chapel of the Resurrection, U.I. and, to my great surprise, the organist displaying incredible mastery on the pipe organ was no other than Professor Lucas. I gather that he learnt the art when he was already an older person.
As a person, Professor Lucas was forthright, eloquent and blessed with powerful argumentation. He had a delightful sense of humour in English and Yoruba in both of which he was eminently eloquent accompanied by a wry smile.
With the departure of Professor Lucas, UI has lost one of its most eminent Professors who had brought honour and fame to the institution. My condolences go to Mrs Kofo Lucas and the children. May God console them and may he rest in peace!
Posted by Bright Orji on December 30, 2020
Prof. Lucas was a great man, and left his prints on sand of soil in global health space. Good night Prof. We will always remember you for who you are, all you were able to accomplish for humanity; and for making the world a better place!
Posted by Dyann Wirth on December 29, 2020
Ade Lucas was a major thought leader during a critical period for neglected disease research. He led the Special Program in Tropical Disease Research at WHO for a decade and he shaped the world's thinking on how to bring modern science to bear on the most neglected diseases. The advances in treatment, prevention and vector control for malaria all had their beginnings at TDR under Ade's leadership - the development of insecticide treated bednets, the development and registration of artemisinin combination therapy, the discovery of the RTS,S vaccine and the development of the malaria RDT. Ade brought a combination of innovative thinking and a discipline of evidence based decision making to bear on every problem. He knew real world problems from personal experience, but his mind allowed for blue-sky ideas to make the game-changing innovations possible. His lasting legacy will the many lives he touched through teaching and training - he will be long be remembered by generations of young scientists as his vision, love of science and dedication to public health are passed from one generation to the next.  Ade was a great personal friend, a valued mentor and a lasting role model. I will miss his optimism, his wit and his warm, generous personality.
Posted by Dave Ross on December 29, 2020
Prof Adetokunbo Lucas was a man of grace, wisdom and keen intelligence. He was a force within the tropical health community. All of us in the global health community will miss him tremendously. I deeply respected all that he added to the deliberations of the International Task Force for Disease Eradication where it was my joy to have met him. He was treasure and will be missed.
Posted by David Molyneux on December 29, 2020
A remarkable man, a giant in Tropical Health. The whole Global Health community will mourn his passing. I was introduced to Ade via his great friend and collaborator Herbert Gilles. My privilege was to have learnt so much from him over the years at TDR meetings and later on the International Task Force for Disease Eradication where his intellectual power, vision, knowledge, wisdom and humanity were always recognized by his colleagues as supreme. He leaves an unmatchable legacy. A great Nigerian of whom his country and home city of Ibadan should be truly proud. I treasure a generous gift from him  after a short time in Liverpool during a period of study which will serve a reminder of a wonderful individual and friend.
Posted by Ndidi Chukwu on December 29, 2020
Developing-8 Mourns Professor Adetokunmbo Lucas

Our deepest condolences to the family, friends, medical community and academia on the death of Professor Adetokunmbo Lucas.

Until his death, Professor ‘Ade Lucas’ as fondly called was renowned globally for his prowess in Public Health. An astute teacher of public health and upon whose wings, many health experts have emerged, contributing to human resource development in Nigeria and globally.

The Developing-8 Health and Social Protection Programme, wish to commiserate with the entire alumni of College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, close associates of Professor Lucas, friends and immediate family on this great loss.

We take solace in the life he lived while with us. He groomed men and women of great value to the society, he contributed significantly to the capacity building and human resource development for public health globally. His contributions to the fight against maternal mortality will remain fresh in our memory.

Rest in Peace our dear Professor Adetokunmbo Lucas.

Signed,
Dr Ado J.G Muhammad
Global Programme Director,
D-8 Health and Social Protection Programme.
Posted by Mark Nwagwu on December 29, 2020
I'm at it again: great things will be said about Dr. Lucas and they will keep coming and coming, more and more. I had written that Dr. Lucas gave me a new life in Cellular Parasitoloy research at the University of Ibadan. Now Prof. Roseangela Nwuba, the first post-graduate student in M.Sc (Cellular Parasitilogy) writes me to say: "Prof. I still remember the part he played when he was at WHO. If I'm not mistaken you sent my TDR training Fellowship application directly to him." Her application was successful. What a man of enormous talents and foresight. I do not now remember the extent to which he had supported me, encouraged me, and would do all within his abilities to promote our tropical disaseas research in an innovative area. I had immediate contact with him! What an amazing man!
May his loving soul rest in peace.

Posted by Kikelomo Ololade Wright on December 29, 2020
Virtually every important decision I have made about my Public Health career had its origin in what I learned from Professor Adetokunbo Olumide Lucas who can be described as “Legendary” in the field of Public Health.

I consider myself as divinely favoured to have met Professor Lucas at an Experts Seminar for women in Lagos almost 2 decades ago where he gave a brilliant exposition (typical of Prof) in a presentation on Maternal Health. I approached him after the program requesting to be his mentee. To my amazement and delight, after several discussions and exchange of emails and documents, he acceded.

Professor Lucas has a most endearing positive quality as a nurturer to his protégés, offering encouragement and factual insights from a position of profound life experience and proficiency in the health profession.

The mentor-mentee relationship I have enjoyed with Professor Lucas is replete with great memories that I am thankful for and would cherish forever. I remember receiving an international phone call from Prof the evening I passed my final examinations to become a Fellow of the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria (Faculty of Public Health and Community Medicine) and he said to me “thank you for the good news, now I can have my first meal for the day.”

Professor Lucas’ mentorship focuses not only on the wellbeing of his mentees, but transcends generations. Through the years, my immediate family including my husband and children have benefitted immensely from his wealth of knowledge through linkages and guidance on educational and career choices. He is a firm believer of a good match in positive skills, quality education, values and good personality.

I have also been privileged to meet and interact with mummy (Mrs Kofo Lucas), who is most kind, compassionate and loving.
The Lord will comfort you (mummy), the entire Lucas clan, friends and colleagues at this time.


Adieu my great mentor!!!
May you find peace and rest in the bosom of the Lord.

Posted by Moradeyo Oyetunji on December 29, 2020
Daddy just wanted the world to be a better place, he was selfless to a fault. He touched my life and the life of my family in a very special fatherly and unforgettable ways. He Lives forever in our hearts...... Rest Easy Daddy.
Posted by OLUSOJI OLUWOLE on December 29, 2020
We celebrate an erudite scholar, a humorous and soft spoken uncle, head of the Oluwole family and the last and oldest surviving grandchild of Bishop Oluwole.
His presence will surely be missed but we are consoled that he has transited to a much deserved rest with his creator.
Farewell Cousin Tokunbo and continue to Rest In Peace.
Soji Oluwole.
Posted by Kelsey Harrison on December 29, 2020
For over 50 years, everything I heard him say throbbed with energy, enthusiasm, and life itself. Surely, history will be kind to him in many ways. Go well, sir.
Kelsey Harrison
Tuusula, Finland
December 28, 2020
Posted by George Alleyne on December 28, 2020
Ade Lucas' scientific achievements in public health are legendary and have been lauded and garlanded by many individuals and learned organizations. His writings are a legacy of good instruction and precepts. His grace and humility are models for all, especially young physicians. But what I recall and cherish most are his friendship and his wise counsel. I will always be grateful for the manner in which he welcomed me to WHO and befriended me in his home in Geneva. he delighted us in our home with his wisdom, his anecdotes and his sense of humour. I always marveled at his capacity to make the perceptive, wise comment at the appropriate moment in the committees on which we served. But throughout the years, when we spoke or corresponded , it was not only science which engaged us, but it was also accounts of family and the strong bonds that should stretch through generations.
Let us all who knew or knew of him be grateful for the time he walked and talked among us and the wisdom he shared with us.
George Alleyne
Posted by Elena Nightingale on December 28, 2020
Ade Lucas was my mentor and teacher. I gained so many insights about international health from him and as a Carnegie corporation staffer about how best to give support to those most likely to use the funds wisely and maintain the benefits of Carnegie support for the longer term.
While at Carnegie, working with Ade was a highlight of my 10 years there. He was a wonderful human being and I shall miss him greatly.
Posted by Yemisi Taylor on December 28, 2020
Gone yet not forgotten, your spirit lives on. Left a legacy of positive experiences. I went with mummy, Mrs Modupe Lucas to his house, he was nice and pleasant. Sleep on beloved

Posted by Oluwaseun Saibu on December 28, 2020
Four years ago, I was privileged to invite you on a magazine programme of Diamond FM of the University of Ibadan and was awed by the reception I received and your willingness not just to be interviewed but to have it done within a short time in the station.
When you walked into the studio that fateful day and lit everywhere with your smile, I knew I had met a rare breed and indeed an ICON.
You are an epitome of humility and honourable in all sense.
Adieu, good hearted Pa till we meet in eternity.
(Presenter of ICON OF THE MOMENT)
Posted by Justice Iyawa on December 28, 2020
My Professor, your books and experiences in Public Health will forever be a reference point in Public Health practice. We just lost a School of Public Health. If you wanna know Professor Ade, get admitted into Public Health. We miss you.
Posted by Laz Eze on December 28, 2020
Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas cannot die, he only transited to immortality. When I discussed my interest to build my career in public health - a decision I made during my 4th year at Ibadan College of Medicine, I got minimal support from people I shared with. My mind was fully made up after reading the profile of Prof. Lucas and the book on tropical medicine he authored. I was highly motivated by his achievements and impact in global health and the medical profession in Nigeria. Meeting him in Abuja within 3 years of my graduation was a rare privilege. May God bless Nigeria with many more Adetokunbo Lucas. Best wishes to his family and loved ones.
Posted by Idowu Olayinka on December 28, 2020
*Prof. Adetokunbo O. Lucas -1931 to 2020*

Professor Adetokunbo O. Lucas was an outstanding medical scientist and scholar.

He served as a former Professor and Head Department of Preventive and Social Medicine at the University of Ibadan.

He was Founding Director, WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases.

He was a former Programme Chair, Carnegie Foundation.

He was a former Professor of International Health, Harvard University.

He was the first person ever to receive, in 1995, the highest academic honour of the University of Ibadan, Honorary Fellowship of UI, FUI.

I remember running into him at the British Airways Terminal 5 at Heathrow Airport in London a few years ago while waiting on our flight to Lagos. We had fruitful discussions on funding of education and health in Nigeria and he was very kind enough to invite me to his home in Ibadan.

He will be sorely missed by all of us who knew him. We commiserate with his family and the entire Lucas dynasty.

We pray for the repose of his great but gentle soul. Good night, Sir.

Idowu Olayinka
(First posted on the Nigerian Academy of Science WhatsApp platform)
Posted by Mark Nwagwu on December 28, 2020
He re-engineered my research priorities and gave me breathing space in cellular and molecular parasitilogy. This was Dr. Lucas. In 1975 Nobel Laureate Chritian de Duve had appointed me to a research fellowship at ICP, International Centre for Cellular Pathology, Brussels. I could not take up the appointment as I had planned to return to Nigeria after 10 years of research on cell and molecular biology. Prof de Duve kept the appointment open and hoped I would join him some day. That day came: in 1979 I applied to ICP to spend my study leave there. Prof de Duve gladly took me to Dr. Adetokunbo Lucas who was then Director of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, TDR for short. I applied for a fellowship grant from TDR and Dr Lucas approved the award. Thus began my research on trypanosomes and later on malaria with funding from TDR. In late summer 1980 they invited me to Geneva. I shall never forget what Dr. Lucas told me: "Mark, do good work. This programme is just beginning. Give us good reason to be proud." Give us good reason to be proud - and so my research now moved to apply the tools of cell and molecular biology to problems in parasitilogy. From 1980 till I retired in 2002, TDR funded our research on Cellular Parasitilogy. My efforts were received its initial and sustained impetus from Dr. Lucas. He was an exceptional man of unusual abilities. May his good soul rest in peace.
Posted by Rahmat Salako on December 28, 2020
Prof.Lucas was a colleague of my husband but was a friend of the family. We were neighbours in Ibadan and I regarded him as Uncle from Lagos.
Rest in perfect peace Prof.
Posted by dee holder on December 27, 2020
Remembered fondly as a colleague at Carnegie Corporation of New York. Rest in peace and rise in glory. 
Posted by Tom Aire on December 27, 2020
I remember Professor Lucas with fondness, gratitude, and admiration. I accumulated a large amount of data for my PhD degree thesis, and I was confounded and wondered how to make sense out of them at a time that computerization was almost unknown. He had a huge machine (perhaps the only one of its type in Nigeria, then --- outside of the Computing Centre at the main campus of the University of Ibadan) in his laboratory at the Department of Preventive Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan. He, personally, along with Professor, then Dr. Ayeni, undertook to commence the onerous analyses of the data. He displayed an infectious level of enthusiasm laced with confidence and humility, characteristic of great minds!! He subsequently served humanity for years and years, both nationally and internationally, and became a source of great pride for Nigeria and the entire black variant of the human race. May his soul rest in perfect peace. 
Posted by Niiayitey Buxton on December 27, 2020
Posted by B.A.K Kofie on December 27, 2020

My personal tribute on transition of late Professor A.O. Lucas:
Professor Lucas was a father to all and sundry in the department of P.S.M, university of Ibadan. I personally know him as not only my departmental boss but also a teacher and a renowned medical researcher who handled the department of P.S.M (past and present) all over the world.
Professor Lucas was a humbled father and brother who gets on with all. We thank him for his magnanimity to humanity. My personal family tribute to his family.
May his soul rest in perfect peace.

B.A.K Kofie
Posted by Idris Muhammad on December 27, 2020
I mourn the passing to eternity of my very dear teacher, mentor and international academic physician and public health guru of wide-ranging accolades and appreciation by international and Nigerian professionals who were either taught, mentored or otherwise influenced or impacted by his extraordinary contributions to international public health and medical education.

It is impossible to iterate his contributions and achievements in life, so I can only recommend that people read his autobiography: "It Was the Best of Times: from Local to Global Health", in order to have a more complete picture of his enviable accomplishments across the world, in health as well as in socio-cultural matters.

As for me - and indeed my fellow UI'69 graduates - who held a re-union at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture Ibadan last year commemorating our 50th year Anniversary, the more I consider the humanity of man, the more I recognize just how humane Professor Adetokunbo Olumide Lucas was when, despite the frailty of age, he physically turned up for the event and stayed till everyone of us left before he departed the venue.

What an extraordinary man of internally professional acclaim, yet with unparalleled humility.

May his gentle soul rest in perfect peace - Amen.

Professor Idris Mohammed.  
Posted by Oladeji Ekundayo on December 27, 2020
Just last year, I had the rare opportunity of checking out some of Prof. Lucas's great accomplishments at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and also sat for an exam in a space named after him in LSHTM. He was a revered man who gave his best to humanity. May his soul rest in peace.
Posted by Ikenna Onyido on December 27, 2020
Prof Lucas was legendary in his achievements, truly inspirational in his proximate and remote mentoring. We all shared in the warmth of his genius and prodigious intellect and drank from the liberal cup of his encouragement. May his gentle and noble soul rest in peace.
Posted by Funso Babawale on December 27, 2020
A very humble, very approachable teacher of teachers. Adieu! May his very humble soul rest in peace.
Posted by Adesida Adewumi on December 27, 2020
He was a rare gift to humanity. He spent and was spent. He died empty contributing all his humanity to humanity. Rest on medical legend. You will be missed. May light guide your way as you go home. Rest in peace. Amen

Dr ADESIDA ADEWUMI ADEDOYIN
SENIOR REGISTRAR,AMINU KANO TEACHING HOSPITAL,AKTH,KANO,NIGERIA
Posted by Tore Godal on December 27, 2020
One of Tokunbo’s many achievents were TDR:
If Howard Goodman had the vision,
And Richard Wilson the concept,
Tokunbo was the implementor. That was a very challenging task, because as Halfdan Mahler, the Diecctor General of WHO at that time, said « there were many charks going after TDR”, but Tokunbo tackled them all and made TDR a major new player of global Health.
I had the privilege of succeeding Tokunbo as the head of TDR. We should have an overlap of 1 month, so I could learn from him, but in his typical fashion, he had evacuated his office, so I had to move straight into his office and he had moved down the corridor to a tiny room.
Many of the tropical diseases are today on the path to elimination. That hat not been the case without Tokunbo’s decisive leadership! 
Posted by Susan Tyrrell on December 27, 2020
It is impossible to summarize in a few paragraphs this amazing man and his dedication to local, national and global health. I first met him at the first immunization seminar in Kumasi, Ghana, in 1974, where he chaired the meeting, and I then had the immense privilege of working with him for a decade in the Tropical Diseases Research Programme (TDR) at WHO, Geneva. Under his leadership, the programme blossomed and so much valuable R&D work was carried out which helped to treat so many sufferers and save lives, including the ground-breaking negotiations with Merck to secure ivermectin at no cost for “as much as required, for as long as it takes” to treat those suffering from river blindness. Accompanying the R&D was the research capacity strengthening (RCS) arm which trained so many scientists in poorer countries: thanks to this work, capacity on the ground was available to help cope with HIV which initially claimed so many lives. TDR was steered by what we called “The Gang of Four” – Tokunbo and the heads of R&D, RCS and programme management. All four are now on another shore and I like to think of them getting back together to deliberate and solve whatever issues surround them.
As a person, Tokunbo was such a warm human being with a wonderful sense of humour, full of jokes and infectious laughter. He had a photographic memory and enjoyed quoting page and verse in response to questions from delegates at the annual TDR governing body meeting – then he would turn to me with a beaming smile, hoping I could produce the document in question open at the appropriate page – a virtually impossible task! He treated all his staff with great respect whatever their level and would enjoy making his own photocopies to enable him to bond with the staff at the photocopying machine. Alongside his passion for improving global health, was his love of playing the organ and those of us in TDR during his decade recall wonderful evenings at his house, enjoying a potluck supper and singing to the many tunes he played.
As his autobiography title indicates, “It was the best of times” – and those times spent with him will remain in our hearts. The world is a sadder place for Tokunbo having left it.
Posted by m1 t1 on December 27, 2020
I met Dr. Lucas through my wife Susan Block Tyrrell and he attended our wedding. Dr. Lucas was an inspirational man who left lasting, deep memories. A man who moved with the technology changes and would entertain any gathering with his wealth of intriguing life stories and his very personal injection of humor. Very sadly missed.
Posted by Baba Issa on December 27, 2020
There is hardly any living doctor in Nigeria who wouldn't have read his book. He was a teacher of teachers and super expert in his chosen and assigned careers and roles. 

I met him over a decade ago during one of the HERFON meetings that led to the publication of the epidemiology of non-communicable diseases in Nigeria that he co-chaired with another academic juggernaut, the Late Professor Akinkugbe.
 
Professor Ade Lucas, continue to rest as we shall all sorely miss you.

Baba Issa (MBBS, MPH, FWACP)
Professor of Psychiatry,
University of Ilorin, Nigeria.
Posted by Olayinka Omigbodun on December 26, 2020
The College of Medicine, University of Ibadan
mourns the passing of
Adetokunbo O. Lucas, FUI, OFR, FAS (Nigeria)
BSc (Durham), MD (Newcastle), DPH (Belfast), SM Hyg. (Harvard), DTM&H (England), FRCP (London), FFPHM (UK), FMCPH (Nigeria), FWACP, FRCOG (UK)
Retired Professor of Preventive & Social Medicine, University of Ibadan
Former Adjunct Professor of International Health, Harvard University
25 November 1931 – 25 December 2020

Professor Adetokunbo O. Lucas (known in international circles as ‘Ade’) had returned to Nigeria after obtaining the Diploma in Public Health and Membership of the Royal College of Physicians in 1959 and was appointed by the University College Hospital to the position of Senior Registrar in Medicine. A couple of years later, he was called to a rescue mission in the Department of Preventive & Social Medicine and that became his passion and the foundation of his lifetime work in epidemiology and public health. He was a major personality in international health for several decades and occupied many strategic positions, including being President of the International Epidemiological Association in 1971. He has contributed significantly to the capacity building and human resource development for public health globally. His scholarship was invaluable in unearthing the knowledge behind the fight against numerous tropical diseases, especially malaria, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. He became the pioneer Director of the World Health Organisation Tropical Disease Research (TDR) programme in 1976. His contributions to the fight against maternal mortality earned him the honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists of the United Kingdom. He was one of the 20 recipients of the Harvard Medal, an award that is made only once every 50 years, in 1986. Indeed, an academic colossus has departed from our midst.

Thank you.

Olayinka O. Omigbodun, FAS, FNAMed
Professor of Psychiatry and Provost
Posted by ISAAC ADEWOLE on December 26, 2020
I am not likely to join those who would describe the transition of Professor Adetokunbo Lucas as shocking. At 89, he was about 36 years past the life expectancy for Nigerian males. He personified public and global health, especially tropical and community medicine all over the world. Known by his international friends and colleagues as "Ade Lucas",he deserves to be celebrated as Ade Lucas is immortal. His book was our bible. His teaching was laced with humour and only the uncircumcised would not follow the trend. He was a teacher of teachers. Truly he was the last of the "Mohicans". May his brilliant soul rest in peace.
Posted by Ibrahim Wakawa Abdu on December 26, 2020
An academic colossus has departed this ephemeral world. Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas, you came, you saw, and you conquered. You left your indelible footprints on the sands of time. Your sweet memories will remain evergreen in memories. Good bye until we meet to part no more.
Posted by Oyewale Tomori on December 26, 2020
On the passing away of Prof Lucas...Our sorrow is mitigated by the blessings of Prof Lucas' exemplary, epoch making, deeply defining, community touching, people oriented and Divinely guided and ordered life. What a life and what a man! We can only thank God that we are around in his lifetime, to be taught by his life, to be guided by his style, to be honoured by being his disciples and follower, to be counted among his "children". What more can we ask for? What more can we be grateful for? What more can we cherish? What more glory can we bask in? What more achievement can we boast of?...I ask again...How much more grateful can we be and thank God
for giving us Professor Adetokunbo Lucas? May his soul rest in peace. May the Lord comfort all in deep pain and sorrow over his departure.
Posted by James Ayangunna on December 26, 2020
Baba was a great teacher and great public health expert. He taught my teachers in public health. His book was our public health bible. The first time my class met him physically was in 1999/2000 when he came from Harvard. He encouraged and prayed for us. He was a father, great academic. Rest on baba in the Lord. Adieu!
Prof J A Ayangunna, Dept of Social Work, UI.
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Recent Tributes
Posted by Adetinoye Olushina on January 21, 2021
Decades of friendship

Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas was a very good friend of my late dad, Dr. George Oladipo Ogunmekan. As the story goes on the 1st of March, 1949, ‘m.v. APAPA' moved from Lagos port at Apapa on its way to Liverpool, England. It took 13 days to reach its destination stopping in Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Las Palmas. My dad and Mr. Lucas, at that time, were on their way to the most important step in their career. Both were going to study medicine at the University of Durham, England. They spent the first three months in Norwich at the City College. The short stay in Norwich helped them adapt to the temperature, food, and other local features of their new environment.

They both started the medical course in Newcastle in September 1949. The six-year course passed remarkably quickly. Their classmates included half a dozen West African students, among whom were Prof. Lucas’s late cousin, Dr. Taiwo Oluwole, and the late Dr. Dele Odulate. My dad, Dr. G.O. Ogunmekan graduated in 1955 while Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas graduated the following year because he had taken an extra course in physiology. In addition to the hard work in going through the curriculum, the period laid the foundation of a warm friendship between Prof. Lucas and my dad, Dr. G.O. Ogunmekan – a friendship that lasted 7 decades!

This is an adaptation of the Tribute written by Prof. Adetokunbo Lucas during the burial service of my dad who passed away on the 12th of January 2018

May his soul rest in perfect peace, Mrs. Adetinoye Olushina
Posted by Lars Gustafsson on January 19, 2021
Dear Lucas family and friends!

I met Adetokunbo once. It was a memory for life. In november 1991 he came travelling to Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm to instruct me and my colleague, the late Björn Lindström, on our mission to Ibadan and Accra. We were both young scientists recruited by professor Folke Sjöqvist to evaluate and guide TDR on decisions regarding clinical pharmacology research strengthening in the two universities. It was amazing that he trusted us. His visionary ideas on tropical research and his friendly mind made our mission unforgettable. He convinced us about the importance and implications of TDR-related research and development. For the past 50 years tropical clinical pharmacology research and training has been a major interest of mine. I am so glad that I have met him and so sorry that it was not feasible to meet Adetonkunbo when visiting and lecturing in Lagos in November 2019. I know that Dr Lucas had many ties with the late Sune Bergström and they worked nicely together. I have been told by a friend of mine, Dr Lennart Freij, that once visiting Stockholm Adetokunbo asked for a possibility to play on an organ. Dr Bergström arranged it and he was playing for Lennart Freij and Sune Bergström in Stockholm Concert Hall, where the Nobel Prize Ceremony takes place normally. Adetonkbu was a great scientist and a great person that I will remember for ever. 
Thank you
Lars L Gustafsson
Professor MD
Karolinska Institutet
Stockholm Sweden
Posted by nike arowobusoye on January 17, 2021
Thank you is a word, an emotion, a state of being and can be an adjective. It is something we express but never often enough. We stand of the shoulders of our quiet heroes, they have a huge impact on our lives and their reverberations echo and unfold silently. Professor Lucas was one of the heroes in my adult life and career. I reached out at the very start of my public health journey and asked for a reference to LSHTM. Professor Lucas gave me one, supported and encouraged me as needed, challenged the unconscious bias shown by LSHTM, never interfered in my decisions and did not expect anything in return..not even a thank you. Of course I did express my gratitude. I intermittently informed him with a grateful heart of my milestones over the years. I wish that I had made an effort to let him know more often how ever so grateful I was, how I learnt a lot from his actions over the years, and how proud l am to be able to say I knew him. As I continue my work in Public Health..I celebrate Prof and remain every grateful. I applaud you Sir, Rest in perfect peace IJMN.
Dr Nike Arowobusoye
his Life
Born in Lagos, Nigeria, where he received his early education, Dr. Lucas obtained his medical training in Britain, graduating B.Sc. (Physiology), First Class Honours in 1953 and M.B., B.S. with honours from the University of Durham in 1956. He was awarded several undergraduate prizes including the Tulloch Prize for obtaining the highest marks in the First MB, BS examination; and the, Philipson Prize -- two prizes for the two candidates who obtain the highest marks inFinal M.B., B.S. examination. His postgraduate training in internal medicine, tropical diseases and Public Health took him to Belfast, London and Boston. In 1958, Queen’s University, Belfast awarded him the Canwarth medal for obtaining the highest marks in the Diploma of Public Health examination.

Back home in Nigeria he taught clinical and community medicine in Ibadan where he was appointed professor and head of the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, a position which he held from 1965 to 1976.His publications include papers on clinical and epidemiological aspects of tropical parasitic and infectious diseases -- schistosomiasis, malaria, African histoplasmosis, etc.

He co-authored 'A Short Textbook of Public Health for the Tropics' with Professor H.M. Gilles. First published in 1973, more than 25,000 copies of the 4th edition have been sold widely in Africa and elsewhere.

For the ten years preceding his work at Carnegie, 1976-86, he directed the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases based at the World Health Organization in Geneva; he received the Prince Mahidol Award 1999 in recognition of his contribution in the development of this programme. From 1986 to 1990, Dr. Lucas served as chair of Carnegie Corporation's grant programme concerned with Strengthening Human Resources in Developing Countries. In 1990, he was appointed Professor of International Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and he is currently an Adjunct professor in the Department of Global Health.

He has served on the expert committees and advisory boards of various national organisations and international agencies: Rockefeller Foundation, Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, Carter Center, the Wellcome Trust Scientific Group on Tropical Medicine, the Bill and Melinda Gates’ Children’s Vaccine Programme and the Governing Board of the Centres for Agriculture and Biosciences International. He chaired the Global Forum for Health Research, for four years when the new entity was established to promote international health research. He represented West and Central African countries on the Governing Board of the Global Fund for Fighting AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Dr. Lucas received various academic honours: the Harvard Medal, the Mary Kingsley Medal of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, the Honorary Fellowship of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the Harvard School of Public Health Alumni Award of Merit. He served as the first honorary President of the Alumni Association of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine for 11 years. The School has named a lecture room in a new building "in honour of Professor Adetokunbo Lucas, renowned international health specialist…"

He has been elected an honorary member of various professional organisations including:

American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

British Society of Parasitology

Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences

International Epidemiological Association

Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons

Swiss Society of Tropical Medicine

Nigerian Academy of Science

Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria

He was elected to the Institute of Medicine (now renamed National Academy of Medicine) of the United States National Academy of Science as one of the first eight persons in a new category of membership -- foreign associate; he also holds honorary degrees from Emory (D.Sc.), Tulane (D.Sc.), Newcastle (D.Sc.), Obafemi Awolowo (DSc), Sussex (MD) and Ibadan (F.U.I.) universities. He was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (FRCOG) ad eundem. His Royal Majesty, the King of Thailand granted him the Knight Grand Cross (First Class) of.0 the Most Admirable Order of Direkgunabhorn. As part of its centenary celebration, The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine awarded him one of the two Centennial medals issued in recognition of a ‘Lifetime Achievement in Tropical Medicine’.

Main hobby - playing classical music on pipe organs

Professor Adetokunbo Lucas, OFR (1931 - 2020)

Professor Adetokunbo Lucas:
Husband, Father, Grandfather, Uncle, Brother, Teacher, Mentor, Friend, Thinker, Leader and Colleague 


BSC (Durham.), MD (Newcastle), DPH (Belfast.), SM Hyg. (Harvard), DTM&H (England)


Fellowships: FRCP (London), FFPHM (UK), FMCPH (Nigeria), FWACP (West Africa), FRCOG (UK,), FAS (Nigeria)

Honorary DSc Degrees: Emory (USA),Newcastle (UK). Obafemi Awolowo (Nigeria), Tulane (USA)

Other Honorary DegreesF.U.I. (Nigeria), MD Sussex(UK)

Adjunct Professor of International Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA



Recent stories

TRIBUTE TO AOL: MY TEACHER, MENTOR, BIG EGBON AND FRIEND by Professor Aderonke Manuwa-Olumide

Shared by Dayo Akinlade on January 22, 2021
"AOL was not just my teacher and mentor. He was my big brother, my big “egbon”. He was also my friend. He has played a pivotal role in my life."

"On behalf of my beloved Bayo and myself, I thank you also for your love for our family. We love you dearly and we will sorely miss you. I am thankful that you have fought the good fight, you have finished the race, you have kept the faith (2 Timothy 4:7), and you did it all with great distinction. After life’s fitful fever, you deserve your rest. Sleep well my dear egbon. Take your well-deserved rest in peace, in the bosom of your maker, our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, Amen."
https://drive.google.com/file/d/16besG-ashR-c_C0zJDPmx1NwvnOo5l-Z/view?usp=sharing

Tribute from Don Hopkins - Carter Centre

Shared by Lola Dare on January 17, 2021

'The world is a much poorer place without Ade Lucas' intellect, compassion and joyful humour.  I always look forward to welcoming him to the meetings of our International Task Force on Disease at the Carter Centre and I benefited from his encouragement on Guinea worm eradication. Since learning of his passing, I have looked and marvelled again at the wonderful autobiography he left his family and the world.  I shall miss him very much'

Letter from Vartan Gregorian, President of Carnegie Corporation of New York

Shared by Dayo Akinlade on January 15, 2021
"He was a brilliant intellectual, a groundbreaking researcher and above all a wonderful human being." 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QQ4BqQU7fZusDDl0z3QyP9gzdkl-oYe1/view?usp=sharing