ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Esau Ade. We will remember him forever.
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
A tribute to Grandpa

One thing I will never forget about Grandpa is that he was a fighter. No matter how many times he was in the hospital I can say I’ve never seen him in a wheelchair, he either had someone help him walk around or used a cane or walker.

When I first got the news I couldn’t stop crying, I couldn’t understand why he had to die when I thought he would be able to leave the hospital. But it was his time, and I am forever grateful that I was able to spend almost twenty years of my life knowing him.

I thank God for allowing him to live to see 81 and I am happy that he was reunited with Grandma in Heaven.

I love and miss you so much Grandpa.

Your grand daughter,
Margaret Ade
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
Dear Uncle (Papa Esau),

It is really sad to think you've left us - though to be with your creator who knows all things.

But l can't forget the good memories when you and mama Anastasia will pay us a visit in Bamenda, during the Easter holidays. Your coming was always showered with much love from a father and uncle. Not only that, you brought your German friend who also loved us so greatly by showering us with gifts.
I could also remember how you gave us tennis rackets and a baseball in exchange for the basketball that washed up by our house. But as children, we felt happy that an uncle could also take from us, something valuable in love.

So too, you and your twin brother (my dad) showed love among yourselves. I can remember how you fondly called each other "Nji" and "Tse", in a lovely tone, till your old age.

Oh, how l wish this same love and concern dwells among us, the children, in an even stronger way!

Permit me to say, Papa Esau, this is a legacy you and your twin brother have left for us the children, grand children and great grand children. This is true philia love.

Adieu Papa Esau N. Ade

Your niece,
Anna N. Ade
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
Tribute to my Uncle

Guess it was between the years 1991 & 1992, but what I remember and which has never left my memory, it was early in the morning in grandma Rose Ateh's 3 room hut. The four brothers sat on the table, I could call a dining table, though it was the lone table in Mama's house. It was kind of a routine that most summer holidays, even after Mama had long passed on, her children came together, even for a week or two, in Chomba.

At 11 years, I loved the adventure of going over to Chomba and it was such fun. Here they were, Mama Rose Ateh's boys arguing this morning. They kept raising their voices and in my "stubbornness" which I was known for, I jumped from the room to the palor and spoke in a tone, too high for my age, asking the four brothers - Pa John, Pa Jacob, Pa Tom & Pa Esau, why they should be quarreling instead of taking advantage of the time they have sacrificed to come together & show love to each other. They were all quiet, I guess asking themselves how a little child could have the courage to talk to her fathers like that. However, they knew they were wrong and instead of scolding me, it was Pa Esau who broke the silence and said "we were looking for a lawyer in this family, Sirri, you will surely be one."

That is a prophesy that came to pass in my life and Pa Esau, I am glad you spoke those words that day! You were not just an uncle to us, but maybe because of your "twinness" with my dad, the connection was stronger; you were a father to us!

You will be missed always, Pa Esau!!

Barrister Sirri Ade
Bamenda, Cameroon
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
Tribute to my late Uncle - Pa Esau Ade (My dad's twin)

Uncle, my memories of you bring this grins and smiles when I remember your constant visits to Bamenda. Growing up as a young girl and being the eldest daughter, I was always there besides my Mom to prepare meals for you and most of the time, because my Mom had to go to the farm, I did the cooking. How you always enjoyed your meals and appreciated the meal was remarkable, because it was not common to have a Father thank you after eating your food (as a young girl).

When ever you came around, it was never as though an "Uncle" was at home, but a "Father". You scolded when you had to and there was never an attitude of "it's not my business" with you. Home was fun, whenever you were around as your presence mitigated my own Dad's usual "harshness". You even scolded him when you saw he was going overboard with his sense of discipline either towards our Mom or us, his children. Mami always left their bedroom for you two brothers to occupy and you were always welcomed.

I can go on and on recounting memories of you, but the most remarkable one was your last visit to Cameroon - to Chomba in particular, which coincidentally was around the period of your 76th birthday. Pa Tom's (your twin brother) children and grandchildren seized the opportunity to celebrate your birthday on January 11th. I guess, for the first time in your later years and as far as we can remember, with both of you physically present. It was a small, but memorable event. We invited your Sister, Mami Pauline Fonteh, and she came all the way from town. All your other sisters/cousins in the village were present. We even brought one of the Pastors who is a friend to the family to pray for you. We trusted and prayed to God, that you will both reach 80 years, despite the health challenges you were going through.
Papa Esau, our fond memories of you will linger on. Adieu, Papa!

From Blessing Yaya
Bafoussam, Cameroon
Posted by Cicily Ade on March 5, 2021
Malkia Ngounoue
Ever since grandma passed away, I became your laughter. I became your smile . I knew you were in pain so I tried to take it away the best way I knew how; with humor. And being your oldest grandchild I felt it my duty to maintain your mental health.
But mostly because I love you.

You believed in me and saw me through all of my trophies, my tears, my triumphs, and losses. I continue to chase those dreams so that one day you would see me on TV, holding the trophy as high as the heavens, over my head, continuing in your footsteps.

You were the heart of our family. The bone of our body. I’ll miss you so much grandpa, and hope that I am making you smile up in heaven. I love you grandpa ❤️❤️❤️.
Posted by Cicily Ade on March 5, 2021
Clèrvie Ngounoue
I remember when I won my first national tennis tournament. Grandpa was so happy when we called him that day. He didn’t say much but the whole call he had a smile on his face and kept telling me how proud he was. He didn’t smile all the time so when Malkia or Carel and I were able to get one out of him it felt like an accomplishment.
I feel like he was more of an all or nothing type of person. When he was happy, he’d laugh at everything we did. He’d smile at the smallest things. And when he was moody or sad you would definitely know it. You’d say something and he’d look at you like you just threw his food on the floor. I say he was an all or nothing type of person mostly because if you didn’t put two full spoons of sugar in his coffee, then he wasn’t going to drink coffee that morning. As baffling as it sounds, when grandpa did something, he would do it wholeheartedly.
He contributed to our church whenever he could. If we won a tournament he would take whatever little money he had in his pocket at that moment and give us all of it. He didn’t care if it was all he had because deep inside his heart he had so much more to give, and he was a giver.
He was a fighter. He fought till his last breath. And even though I couldn’t see him in his last days, I am forever grateful for the days that he fought just to see us succeed. Because those days where he was fighting sickness, and even death; those days turned into weeks, months, and eventually years. I thank God for Pa Ade’s genetics, because a lot of people have asked me if I run track, even though I am a tennis player, and now every time I hear that, it’s a reminder for me of his presence.
I thank God for his love, his generosity, but most importantly, I thank God for Pa Ade’s life and legacy that will live on in all of us. I love you and will miss you so much ❤️❤️❤️.
Posted by Cicily Ade on March 5, 2021
CAREL NGOUNOUE

My Grandfather was a very strong man. He was as strong as solid rock, and was never afraid. But what amazed me most about him, was the strength that he had on the outside and the inside.
Everytime I think of him, whether it is in tennis competition or in daily life, I could always hear him say, "keep fighting, stay in it." That strength took him all the way to 81 years of age, and I loved everyday, and every second that I got to spend with him.
So today, I choose not to think of him in vain, but instead celebrate him, his life, all the strength that he gave me, and still gives me. Thank you so much Grandpa. I love you and will miss you.
Posted by Cicily Ade on March 5, 2021
My dearest Papa,
It’s still so not real that you’re gone. I watched a video of you dancing bottle dance not long ago with your limited movement and you enjoyed it so much, it’s hard for me to comprehend that you’re gone. Your resilience especially from the time you had a stroke till about 14 years after, shows us how we ought to proceed in life and I pray we have the strength to emulate you. Like the athlete that you were, you fought a tough battle in sickness and never gave up till your last breath. This has truly motivated us and especially our athletic children, to never give up. In music your beautiful tenor voice would never go unnoticed. Even in your dying bed you joined my sister and myself to praise God. Thank Jesus for your life ! Thank you Papa for your exemplary service to God and to us. I will remember and miss you always, especially when I sing. Your legacy lives in us all and your grandchildren. Oh how I wish you lived to see the greatest achievements of your grandchildren but I know you’re cheering them from high above with Mami. I love you Papa. You and Mami live on in me❤️❤️. I miss you both so dearly .
Posted by Dr Reeves Ade on February 25, 2021

02/25/2021
Memory of a Champion

   Papa, you were a true champion. The impact you made in my life is being manifested as I’ve grown to be the kind of person you expected to be. It all started over four decades ago when I was growing as a little boy, I saw you get up very early in the morning each day, put on your sports outfit and go for a jog before going to work. Your resilience and hard work as an athlete led to your award of several medals which you showed me when I was growing, you told me about your participation at the Olympic Games in Mexico and Munich (Germany). Around the early 80s, I saw you participate in the Mount Cameroon Race. You were already in your 40s during that race and most of the participants were in their early 20s or less. I remember some of your friends telling you not to venture, that it was too risky because of your age and that they didn’t ’t think you’ll make it to the summit. Despite all odds, you did not only make it to the summit, but came back before more than half of the participants. I remember when the famous Zachary Nkuo of blessed memory announced your entry into the municipal stadium In Buea town heading to the finished line, a bunch of people including myself were running behind you to escort you to the finished line. It was truly a remarkable moment. A few years later, I saw you training some famous long distant athletes like Lekunze Thimothy also of blessed memory who later became the champion on multiple occasions of the mount Cameroon race. Papa, you did not only impact us and your grand children but also people you did not know.
   When you were awarded a scholarship by the Cameroon government to study coaching in Germany, you took upon yourself to study sports medicine as an addition. While you were in Germany, I became a very stubborn kid hanging out with bad friends. Mum reported me to you and I remember you wrote a letter to me telling me that there will be no room for me in the family if I didn’t change and start behaving like a gentleman, you also reminded me in that letter how I could become worthless in future if I decided to take that path and not study hard to prepare for my future. I grew up with those words in my head even as you continued reminding me every step of the way.
   One of the most exciting moment I had with you was when you came for holidays from Germany unannounced in the mid 80s, you and mum gave me a surprise visit while I was in school in Limbe. I remember screaming and jumping when I saw you for the first time since you left for Germany, the ambiance was too much amongst my peers and it made me feel so blessed. When I was looking for a wife, you advised me on how to choose a lady that would make a happy home for me and give me happiness for the rest of my life and when I finally presented my partner to you, there was an automatic chemistry that attracted you and mum to her. You were part of our wedding and I saw so much joy in you on that day.
   When we all migrated to the United states, you made it clear to me that it was your wish to see me have a university degree and when I told you that I had plans to go to pharmacy school, you encouraged me not to give up my dreams. I have since become a doctor of Pharmacy and when I showed you my certificate, you blessed me and raised your hands saying “Thank you God” if I happen to die now, I’ll know that you achieved my wishful you.
   Thank you papa for having champion my path for success as you lived by example. You fought relentlessly even in your sick bed on multiple occasions when even the health care practitioners said you were not going to make it but you proved them otherwise. I will live the rest of my life knowing that I was raised by a champion and try to emulate your examples.
   Rest well papa until we meet to part no more.
Posted by Willy Ade on February 25, 2021
A Tribute to my father, Pa Ade Esau Nji

Pa Ade Esau Nji was my father. A kind-hearted father, loving, self-controlled and humble. That was Pa Ade.
I thank you for receiving me into your home as your own daughter. You showed me love, you took care of me and protected me. You didn’t have silver or gold to give me, but you loved me as your daughter.
Papa, thank you!
Thank you, for the moral upbringing. You taught me love, respect, humility and self control. Above all, you taught me the fear of God.
Papa thank you. As a child growing up, I saw you as and called you “Papa”. Thank you for the fatherly love you showed me - You paid my school fees, you gave me food, shelter and protection as your own daughter.
Papa, you fought a good fight. You finished your race and you kept your faith. We love you, but God loved you more.
Adieu, Papa.
Rest in Perfect Peace.

Your daughter,
Therese Tassi
Limbe, Cameroon
Posted by Willy Ade on February 25, 2021
TEMOIGNAGE

Mon beau-frère,
J’ai eu le privilège de te côtoyer quand tu étais à Buea. J’ai observé en toi le souvenir d’un homme souriant, aimant et rassembleur.
En ce jour, je suis durement éprouvé par ta disparition, mais ce qui me console est la pleine conviction que tu as achevé ta tâche avec amour. Tu étais un père digne.
Repose en paix et que tes bonnes œuvres t’accompagnent auprès du Christ, notre sauveur.
Ton beau-frère,
Tonton Joseph Moumbe
Edea, Cameroun
Posted by Willy Ade on February 24, 2021
Papa,
You overcame daunting odds to make it in life. You were the personification of endurance and patience. The fact that you made it this far speaks to the greatness of the God we serve.
Thank you for teaching me how to be a man and a father. I will cherish the many conversations we had and do my best to live up to your expectations.
Rest in peace, Papa.

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
A tribute to Grandpa

One thing I will never forget about Grandpa is that he was a fighter. No matter how many times he was in the hospital I can say I’ve never seen him in a wheelchair, he either had someone help him walk around or used a cane or walker.

When I first got the news I couldn’t stop crying, I couldn’t understand why he had to die when I thought he would be able to leave the hospital. But it was his time, and I am forever grateful that I was able to spend almost twenty years of my life knowing him.

I thank God for allowing him to live to see 81 and I am happy that he was reunited with Grandma in Heaven.

I love and miss you so much Grandpa.

Your grand daughter,
Margaret Ade
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
Dear Uncle (Papa Esau),

It is really sad to think you've left us - though to be with your creator who knows all things.

But l can't forget the good memories when you and mama Anastasia will pay us a visit in Bamenda, during the Easter holidays. Your coming was always showered with much love from a father and uncle. Not only that, you brought your German friend who also loved us so greatly by showering us with gifts.
I could also remember how you gave us tennis rackets and a baseball in exchange for the basketball that washed up by our house. But as children, we felt happy that an uncle could also take from us, something valuable in love.

So too, you and your twin brother (my dad) showed love among yourselves. I can remember how you fondly called each other "Nji" and "Tse", in a lovely tone, till your old age.

Oh, how l wish this same love and concern dwells among us, the children, in an even stronger way!

Permit me to say, Papa Esau, this is a legacy you and your twin brother have left for us the children, grand children and great grand children. This is true philia love.

Adieu Papa Esau N. Ade

Your niece,
Anna N. Ade
Posted by Willy Ade on March 6, 2021
Tribute to my Uncle

Guess it was between the years 1991 & 1992, but what I remember and which has never left my memory, it was early in the morning in grandma Rose Ateh's 3 room hut. The four brothers sat on the table, I could call a dining table, though it was the lone table in Mama's house. It was kind of a routine that most summer holidays, even after Mama had long passed on, her children came together, even for a week or two, in Chomba.

At 11 years, I loved the adventure of going over to Chomba and it was such fun. Here they were, Mama Rose Ateh's boys arguing this morning. They kept raising their voices and in my "stubbornness" which I was known for, I jumped from the room to the palor and spoke in a tone, too high for my age, asking the four brothers - Pa John, Pa Jacob, Pa Tom & Pa Esau, why they should be quarreling instead of taking advantage of the time they have sacrificed to come together & show love to each other. They were all quiet, I guess asking themselves how a little child could have the courage to talk to her fathers like that. However, they knew they were wrong and instead of scolding me, it was Pa Esau who broke the silence and said "we were looking for a lawyer in this family, Sirri, you will surely be one."

That is a prophesy that came to pass in my life and Pa Esau, I am glad you spoke those words that day! You were not just an uncle to us, but maybe because of your "twinness" with my dad, the connection was stronger; you were a father to us!

You will be missed always, Pa Esau!!

Barrister Sirri Ade
Bamenda, Cameroon
his Life

Biography

Early Years:


Mr. Esau Nji Ade was born with his twin brother Thomas, on January 11, 1940 to Pa Moses Chimenang and Mami Rose Ateh in Ekombe, Kumba Division, in what was then the British Southern Cameroons. They were barely five, when their father passed away and so in 1946, their mother relocated the family to Santa, Bamenda Division, where they lived with their uncle, Tata Samuel Ade Fobujong. There, he and his twin brother were not immediately sent to school, but were busy tending their uncle’s cattle and helping in his coffee farm. It wasn’t until they were teenagers that they finally had the opportunity to go to school.

While in school, he developed his God-given talents into a passion for track and before long, he became a household name in Bamenda following his outstanding performances at various athletic competitions. He later moved to the coastal town of Victoria, with their oldest brother, Mr. John Chimenang who was a customs officer, to complete his primary education. The year before his graduation - in 1961, British Southern Cameroons obtained independence by joining neighboring La Republique du Cameroun and under this new dispensation, became known as West Cameroon, in the newly minted Federal Republic of Cameroon.

With his reputation preceding him, the West Cameroon Police Force came calling and quickly recruited him to join the police, even before he had written his final exam. That's how he got admitted into the Police College in Mutengene, Victoria Division. At the end of his training, Constable Esau Nji Ade was posted to the town of Victoria, where he started working as a police officer.


While he was travelling the globe representing the country, he was employed as a sports teacher at the Government Bilingual Grammar School, Man-O-War Bay – Victoria. When the school was relocated to a new campus in Molyko - Buea, the family also moved to Buea in 1968. While in Buea, he was assigned to teach/coach track and field in the surrounding secondary schools, in addition to his other duties. Notable among these schools was, the Baptist Teachers’ Training College (BTTC), Great Soppo – Buea. That’s how he got to be known as “Coach” by the thousands of students he trained.

In 1974, dad won an international scholarship from the East German Government to pursue diploma studies in Athletic Coaching. On his return from Germany in 1975, he was transferred to Yaounde – the capital city, as the National Coach for Athletics. In 1978, he was transferred back to Buea, where he continued his coaching career. In 1984, he won another scholarship to study coaching at the University of Mainz, Germany. After completing that course he went on to study physiotherapy at the University of Cologne, in Germany. He returned to Cameroon in 1988 and with his new credentials expected promotion or reclassification to a rank that was commensurate with his qualifications, along with a salary revalorization. Instead of a promotion, he was sent to teach physical education at the Bilingual Grammar School in Molyko - Buea. He would later be appointed Provincial Athletic Coach for the Southwest Province.

Unfortunately, until his retirement from government service in 1995, his civil service status was never changed and he left without ever enjoying the benefits of all the advance training he was able to achieve. Even after he went on retirement, he was not paid the pension benefits that he was entitled to, for the 33 years of service and honors that he won for the nation.


In December of 2006 he suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed. We believe that the endurance and mental fortitude that he developed as an Olympian, helped him to beat a host of other life-threatening illnesses and challenges – prostate cancer in 2009, the death of his sweet heart, our mom, in 2012; bypass surgery on his heart in 2013 and back-to-back brain surgeries in 2016. Above all, God's grace was upon him and sustained him throughout the years. 

Family and social life

While he was working as a policeman in Victoria, he met and fell in love with the charming Miss Anastasia Bassek, who was also an athlete. It was love at first sight and the two got married shortly after that. The union produced seven children: Willibrord, Reeves, Isabelle, Cicily, Julius, Arllen and Roseline.

Together, they did their best to give us a solid Christian education - sending us to mostly missionary elementary schools and  boarding missionary secondary schools. Whether he was away somewhere in the world representing Cameroon or somewhere in the country leading student athletes to an OSUSC event, Mom would hold down the fort and when he came back, he addressed any disciplinary issues that took place while he was away. As such, he was able to ensure that we had the best possible upbringing we could have under the prevailing circumstances.

Throughout his life, dad always found joy in providing for his family. With no income at retirement, the quest to continue to take care of the family moved him to venture into entrepreneurship. He started a physiotherapy consultancy and began traveling across the South West Province, providing therapy to people who had suffered a stroke and patients who were suffering from neuromuscular injuries. During a visit with one of his patients, the General Manager of the Cameroon Development Corporation (CDC) ran into him and asked him to come work for the company as the Sports Coordinator for the corporation. He jumped on the offer and held that position until 2002, when he resigned and moved to the United States to be with his wife and last daughter who had migrated to the US a year earlier.

In December of 2006 he suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed. Like the Olympian he was, he developed the mental fortitude that helped him to beat a host of other life-threatening illnesses – prostate cancer in 2009, heart bypass surgery in 2012 and back-to-back brain surgeries in 2016 – before his battered body finally gave up on January 16, 2021. Hopefully, he is re-united with his “date” our mom, who preceded him eight and a half years ago.

Christian and Social Life

Having been baptized into the Presbyterian Church as a baby, he was confirmed as a teenager in 1957. He stayed true to his faith through out and actually got our mom (who was originally a Catholic) to become a Presbyterian, after they got married. He was a member of the Christian Youth Fellowship (CYF) of the Presbyterian Church Great Soppo - Buea, and even though our mom was never a member, he convinced her to accompany him to their practice sessions and multiple other events. Spurred by their love for singing, it wasn't a hard "sell" for our dad to convince our mom to join him on various CYF events like rallies, etc.

When he was transferred to Yaounde in 1975, one of the first things he did was to look for an English-speaking congregation in this French-Speaking city, where our family could worship. At that time, the only place where English-speaking Cameroonians or "Anglophones" of the Presbyterian faith could go to worship, was at the EPC de Djoungolo, which had created a special service for English speakers. Before we could even figure out how to get to church on Sundays, dad had already joined the congregational choir, while our mom continued with her activities as a member of the Christian Women Fellowship (CWF).

He was transferred back to Buea in 1978 and once there, he joined the newly-formed Christian Men Fellowship (CMF) of Presbyterian Church, Great Soppo.  Even after joining the CMF, his love for singing was still very strong and caused him  to join the English Choir (which was later renamed Jordan Choir). He continued to be a member of that choir until he relocated to the US. As for the CMF, he maintained his membership in Great Soppo, even while he was in the US. When in 2006 the CMF was established in the US, with the first branch launched at the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church, be became one of the founding members of that group and by extension, a pioneer member of the CMF in America. 

This love for singing was transmitted to his children, who have been singing in various church groups and choirs from the time they were teenagers. 

Besides his engagement in church activities, dad was also very involved in community activities, particularly those of cultural groups or associations he belonged to. He was a lifelong member of the Ngemba meeting in Buea and was on the executive board for many years. When he moved to the US, he joined the Chomba Development and Cultural Association (CHODECA) - USA. He remained an active member of the CHODECA - DC branch, until his death.

He will be dearly missed not just by his family but also, by
the members of the various groups that he was a part of.

May the Almighty grant him eternal rest till we meet to part no more.
Recent stories

Pa Ade, my "miracle man"

Shared by Willy Ade on February 18, 2021
In February of 2018, our family offered a thanksgiving prayer and presented a special song at the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church, where most of us worship and where our dad was a member for the past 13 years. By this act we wanted to thank God for His grace upon the life of our dad, by sustaining him through back-to-back brain surgeries in July and August of 2016. 
After those surgeries and three months of rehabilitation, dad came out looking even better than he was before he went through that ordeal. So, I started calling him "miracle man", due to the miraculous way he survived the surgeries (all things considered).
Considering that both our parents were choristers and that we had inherited the singing gene, my siblings and I, along with our spouses, decided to sing "Wonderful grace of Jesus" on the day of the thanksgiving.