ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, Chief Dr. Kamanda BAYIE, The Ekpeti of Takwai. God's ways are not our ways. Only He alone knows why things happen when they happen. We guess He realized earth was no longer a place for him. He realized It was time for him to reside with Him in His kingdom. He realized how much Chief Dr. Kamanda was fading and how tired he was with life here on earth. He knew it was about time he went to shine with Him in heaven. Although we loved him so dearly, we could not make him stay longer. It is hard for us to fully understand why but we are comforted by the knowledge that he is with his maker, our Savior. We know our Savior only welcomes the best.  May he rest in perfect peace in the bossom of our Lord.
Chief Dr. Kamanda Bayie: you will be sorely missed and we will remember you forever!


Posted by Clive Besua on April 6, 2021
The lion of Takwai has fallen
Dr. Kamanda Bayie the Legend has defied flesh to heed the calling of God, the creator.
Your footprints are large but your humanity much larger.
A practical, realistic, and accomplished man. He was never afraid to vocalize his opinions to those around him whether he knew the person or not. He loved his family so dearly. Thank you for raising your daughter my Gorgeous Marv to be the woman of my dreams and the many memories I will forever treasure.
Adieu Sir, till we meet again. “If we live, we live for the Lord; and if we die, we die for the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord” Romans 14: 8
Posted by Kamanda Karen on April 4, 2021
 Grief they say is the final act of love, but nothing ever prepares you for the loss of a loved one... I guess it’s a loss you must carry at some point .

Daddy, you always challenged me for the better, believed in me when I doubted myself and refused to give up on me through it all..thank you for the high standards and values you bestowed on me. I have always wanted nothing but to make you proud and I hope I did. I hope during your stay on earth, I was able to translate the love, respect and honor I hold for you.

  It is a blessing to have been fathered, raised and mentored by one of the finest that you are...and as much as I wish you lived longer, it is an honor to lay you to rest sir..

 I love you through this world and beyond, and till we meet again...Rest easy King!

  Karen kamanda
Posted by Kwei Haliday N on April 2, 2021
A fallen legend. I didn't have the privilege to meet you but u have left an indelible footprint which will keep your legacy alive. Your daughter my colleague made me to know you. You had robust propriety values and intellectual acumen. You didn't join the politics of interest which most of your peers resorted to. You were a man of your words and couldn't succumb to intimidations. RIP Dr Bayie
Posted by Fonkeng Epah George on March 31, 2021
We met in Seat of Wisdom College in 1969 as school mates, later in the University of Yaoundé in 1975 as scholars and finally as colleagues and friends at the defunct Institute of Human Sciences (ISH). A man with a generous heart, kind and gentle to a fault. However, bold and steadfast but above all possessed one of the sharpest minds l have ever come across; capable of baffling any great mind with his style of analysis and argument. We called him SUPER and more fondly as CK. He will be remembered as a practical sociologist and a great scientist who stood against any form of injustice to mankind. Farewell my dear friend.
Posted by Elias Bissong on March 30, 2021
The Iroko tree of Ekpeti, the lion of Takwai. My mentor and model in life. Daddy you were my special spirit-level as the builders will called it. Yes my spirit level, and reference point. You inspired me to be aspire in life and my success today is an indication of your effort. I learned from you that sky can never be my limit in life as long as I stay focus. You taught me that, education is all I need to find my path. You taught me that life is a battle. Each time you visited the village, as a young lad, I will hang around just to hear you speak. Your words were with wisdom, simple, gentle, kind. You never raised your voice and always gentle. You taught me how to speak less, listen more and stay focus. You taught me to esteem family value than myself. Daddy, this legacy will never leave me. I will carry it with me for the rest of my life. You were a good soldier and a good teacher and I wish you could hear me say thank you sir, I wish you could hear me say I love you, but this doesn't matter anymore papa. I can only express this by displaying this legacy to your people. You fought a good fight and you won the battle and I will not disappoint you. Your job for Ekpeti and Takwai is over but your memories will never be over. Papa you will be highly missed by the family, Ekpeti, Takwai but you have gone to a place of rest my chief and defence commander.

RIP
Posted by Julius Tawe on March 25, 2021
Hard to believe. You were not only married to my elder sister-Esther but you were like a father, caring and loving one for that matter. We called you Daddy. You told me to be focused as I was leaving for the US. You gave our family your all by taking care of your mother-in-law who later went ahead and was laid in your house. Ohh Daddy, Man of all people. You won't even wait for my visit back to Cameroon so you can again give me some words of wisdom. I really cannot comprehend you are no more on this Earth. Rest in peace and greet your daughter Kimberly.
Julius Tawe Massa.
Posted by MBONG SMITH YUSINYU on March 25, 2021
It's really Sad how I never actually knew this great Dr, Father in person. I feel you were a great person and well respected Man in the society.
The cold hands of death has taken you from the world. But our hearts won't ever forget you.
You're legacy leaves On.
Rest in paradise Dr Kamanda
Go well.
Posted by Valantine Fontem on March 22, 2021
As young men who knew what tomorrow was going to be? You spend most of your secondary school holidays and mid term in the Fon of Fontem palace in Azi. Little did we know that he was grooming a young chief. However, parents knew what to do for their people. You turn up to become the chief of your area a lot of people may have seen the wisdom to rule you people but not know that by going through seat of wisdom college Fontem spending time with the Fon of Fontem was preparing you for a better tomorrow. You stood up tall both traditionally and also becoming a Dr. In your your education. We miss each other as you left college but the memories remain. I remember when mid term was over and you were about to go to school,the late Fon of Fontem Defang will speak to you in Bayange language . A language l didn't understand. You were also loved as a prince in Azi palace.
Remember to tell your ancestors how the relationship between Bayang and Fontem is now today.
Posted by Patience Fonkem on March 20, 2021
Still difficult to believe that you are gone Chief. Since our meeting on 13 Sept 1966 in Seat of Wisdom Fontem, our paths came together and we never parted ways. You since became a brother - spending midterm breaks in Atoabechied Palace or in Takwai. As you go first, please bring my greetings to our mother, Ma Franchika Tiku as Pa Wilson Bayie fondly called his wife and my own mother, Uwa'ma'ah who also joined her husband HM Fuankem Lekeanyi I on June 6, 2020.
Whether teaching me how to swim at the Belleu Mission, eating the fish Mama brought to us in Fontem or at your home in Oyomabang, Yaounde, you were always the dearest of brothers.
Go well and continue to love your darling wife, your children, Anyi, your younger sister and bring our greetings to Peter Oben, your younger brother who preceded you in the Heavenly Mariapolis. Prepare a place for us great gem!
HIM Fuankem Achankeng I, University of Wisconsin, USA

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Clive Besua on April 6, 2021
The lion of Takwai has fallen
Dr. Kamanda Bayie the Legend has defied flesh to heed the calling of God, the creator.
Your footprints are large but your humanity much larger.
A practical, realistic, and accomplished man. He was never afraid to vocalize his opinions to those around him whether he knew the person or not. He loved his family so dearly. Thank you for raising your daughter my Gorgeous Marv to be the woman of my dreams and the many memories I will forever treasure.
Adieu Sir, till we meet again. “If we live, we live for the Lord; and if we die, we die for the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord” Romans 14: 8
Posted by Kamanda Karen on April 4, 2021
 Grief they say is the final act of love, but nothing ever prepares you for the loss of a loved one... I guess it’s a loss you must carry at some point .

Daddy, you always challenged me for the better, believed in me when I doubted myself and refused to give up on me through it all..thank you for the high standards and values you bestowed on me. I have always wanted nothing but to make you proud and I hope I did. I hope during your stay on earth, I was able to translate the love, respect and honor I hold for you.

  It is a blessing to have been fathered, raised and mentored by one of the finest that you are...and as much as I wish you lived longer, it is an honor to lay you to rest sir..

 I love you through this world and beyond, and till we meet again...Rest easy King!

  Karen kamanda
Posted by Kwei Haliday N on April 2, 2021
A fallen legend. I didn't have the privilege to meet you but u have left an indelible footprint which will keep your legacy alive. Your daughter my colleague made me to know you. You had robust propriety values and intellectual acumen. You didn't join the politics of interest which most of your peers resorted to. You were a man of your words and couldn't succumb to intimidations. RIP Dr Bayie
Recent stories

Chief Dr. Kamanda Bayie, My Secondary School Buddy

Shared by Chief Fonkem on March 27, 2021
One great memory of my days in Our Lady Seat of Wisdom Fontem was my meeting with Kamanda Bayie from RCM Takwai. Both of us were members of the 1966 Class of 42 Students, pioneers of the school. My admission number was 038 and his was 039. Both of us were admitted after the official interview had been conducted and 35 students admitted. Destiny brought us together and since kept us together until he left me on March 19, 2021. We were so close that Pa Wilson Bayie, his father, would go fishing with me without Kamanda. After Secondary School, I went to play in a small band in Ringo Bar, Tombel and Kamanda went to live with a relative in Buea.

In Buea, he took advantage of a private library owned and run by Dr. E.M.L Endeley to study for his A/Ls. I left the Band to teach English in Grand College de la Menoua in Dschang. After writing the A/Ls he joined me in Dschang to look for a teaching job too. He never taught because he passed his A/L exams that season and left me for the University of Yaounde where he studied Sociology. He earned a Doctorate under the supervision of Professor George Ngango before I joined him in Yaounde in 1989. He was actually the first student from Seat of Wisdom to earn a doctoral degree. When I arrived in Yaounde for Public Service work, I lived with him for about a year before I got my own place. And not only that. Even when I had blood relations in Yaounde, I still sent my oldest daughter to live with him when I was still in graduate school in Buea. I ascended the throne of Atoabechied in 1997 and soon after that Kamanda became the Ekpeti of Takwai. He fondly referred to me as "Atoabechied" with an exclamation that emanated from the energy he always had.

Following is one memory of our adolescent years in Secondary School. This memory was my swimming lessons from Kamanda at the River Begueoh swimming spot below the Roman Catholic School, Belleu. Swimming there was a test place of bravery. Bangwa people believe that deep water pools are one of the places where witchcraft thrives. The deeper a pool and the darker it is to see through the water, the stronger the belief that any such pool is a meeting place for water witches and wizards. Due to this belief, Bangwa people were and probably remain generally very fearful of eteng (deep water pools). And many of the different eteng were known to belong to different people or groups. For example, we grew up hearing stories about Ateng Atoh, Ateng Fuachap, Ateng Lefoc (the ateng of Atoh, the ateng of Fuachap, the ateng of Lefoc). September and October, the first months of the school year, were the last months of the rainy season in Bangwa, West Africa and usually had very heavy rains, which caused lots of flooding along the riverbanks. Then the rivers were still dangerous not simply because of the witches and wizards supposed in them, but also because the huge fast flowing currents could very easily sweep people away.

Students at Seat of Wisdom, our school in the first two years, started going down the valley to swim by early November when the rains stopped, the volume of water reduced, the sun was beginning to get hot, and the water was becoming a little warmer. Even then, it was not easy for people to jump into the pool with every iota of confidence. In addition to fearing being swept away, there was the belief that the people who inhabited the water depths in the rainy season were still in there. Witches and wizards were not the best friends of mortal human beings and people did not venture easily to those places believed to be where they were. In Bangwaland, such places as big caves, other landforms that appeared irregular or unusual to the Bangwa person’s mind, and deep dark pools were the abode of the forces of evil, including witches and wizards.

With these beliefs in mind, the cunning of the Bangwa boys was very evident when all the boys would pull off their clothing by the pool, but almost no one would readily jump into the pool. Everyone seemed to pretend to be busy with something else waiting for the first person to jump. If that first person jumped into the pool and swam safely and came out unharmed, then the water was safe for the swimming excitement. That one person to inaugurate the beginning of the swimming season was nearly always my cousin, Christopher Atem. He was raised in Kumba and had either known many daring adventures or did not know about the local Bangwa beliefs about witches and wizards in river pools. He was a very brave boy by my reckoning.

If he was not on hand to open the swimming season, my friend, Kamanda Baiye, would do so. As a Banyang boy, we all knew that they had the secrets of the waters and could communion with the witches and wizards in any kind of deep dark pool. And truly speaking, if a family lost a member by drowning, the family dispatched an emissary to Akap (Banyangland) to hire a Banyang swimmer (Nkwarre) as an expert to look for the body in the waters because those folks did not fear the waters, however high in flood, however dark, and however deep a pool was.
I will reserve for another occasion, the big baked fish meals that Mama Francisca Tiku, his mother, brought to us regularly at college. Mama Francisca Tiku was a great inspiration to us all.
Go well friend and brother until we meet again to part no more!

H.I.M Fuankem Achankeng I (Ruler & Professor)


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Shared by Micheal Bayietarh on March 26, 2021
Daddy, the iroko, the prince of peace,my role model, you made know that as man,I should be outstanding as you have ever been.You made me understand that children are always one.Just like you adopted me as your biological son,I never felt the absence of my biological father up till date . Daddy,I have learned much from you, and I will continue from where you left us.I will for ever miss you daddy.I promise to remain diligent to this wonderful family you have belt all these years.RIP daddy.
Shared by Solange Fonkem on March 20, 2021
Uncle Kamanda,as i  called you.You were the only uncle I knew  when my Dad  brought me to Yaounde for the very first time.I lived with you for a year to attend CBA .My Dad had many other friends and relatives living  in Yaounde at the time but he preferred  your house .Uncle  you treated me like one of yours.Every body who came to your house thought I was your child.You always called me Leke my daughter. You  and your family are   the  only ones who  called me Leke.You were very kind in the way that you would  give me 1000 frs cfa pocket money weekly for school either to use for lunch or to pay my way back home because CBA  was very far from  your home .It was in your house that I learned  how to  speak my first word of French language .It is very sad to say good bye uncle.Infact I still can't believe you are gone.I would  for ever miss you uncle 
Your daughter  Leke