She will live forever in our hearts.
  • 38 years old
  • Born on April 4, 1980 .
  • Passed away on January 19, 2019 .

This memorial website was created in memory of my beautiful sister, Namrata Singh.

Posted by Celeste Brown Thomas on April 4, 2019
Thinking of you, Moni, on your birthday. Your smile lives on among the stars, an in all our hearts.
Posted by Renuka Suddapuli on February 1, 2019
First, I saw her here and there in the IRRI/UPLB when I went there to complete my master studies. Later, without any planning, we were in the same apartment sharing rooms with some other colleagues from IRRI. At one day in the middle of the night, she knocked my door, asked that she can sleep my room for that night. Before I did not know, that day she felt in the bathroom, was in a pain. After that night I found my second sister and forever best friend!!!! ‘My stupid girl’ that how we called each other. We shared the apartment, later a house, while sharing all the ups and downs in our lives. In our house, we shared one room (a child’s room) together, but left two big rooms empty: so, we were ‘stupid girls’! But that made our life filled with so many memories. We exchange our position as an elder sister to a younger sister: comfort each other when we got hurt, when we were down…. The day I left the Philippines, at Manila airport, we told each other that we will not talk each other day, may not write every month, but we will live each other’s heart, and keeping vibration. I can’t write it down who is Moni, no suitable or enough words……. When I lost my parents, that made me felt that I am lonely in this world, sad, missing feeling whenever they came to my mind. After that, I was in a same condition, after your lost, my dear girl. Dear girl, is the way the ‘karma’ or ‘God’s wish’, I made my mind to accept it, but I keep you forever in my heart!!! My deepest condolence to her family (mama, I wanna hug you.) and all her friends!
Posted by Dubey Akhilesh on January 31, 2019
We never met but Dr. Sir said about the disease, despite the world's most advanced medicine, he is no longer among us. It is a very tragic, we are very scared of this disease because my mother is also suffering from this disease. I wish this disease was cured. Give the peace of Lord Moni Ji       
                     Jai Shri Krishna
Posted by Adam Barclay on January 31, 2019
Doreen and I met Moni while I was working, and Moni doing her PhD, at the International Rice Research Institute in Los Baños, Philippines, in the mid-late 2000s. I don’t remember exactly when, where or how we met, but we had many mutual friends; meeting was inevitable.
Sometimes, after people meet each other, they become friends, then – if they share enough ideas, stories, thoughts, food, debates, and laughs, and if circumstances allow it – they become good friends. Sometimes this transition can be pinned on a single moment – a joke, a smile, a night spent talking well past any reasonable bedtime. Other times, it’s a slow and steady accumulation of common ground. You realise all of a sudden that this person who was at first a colleague, or an associate of sorts, who became a friend, is now part of your inner circle.
For Doreen and me, it was the latter path. The transition happened sometime in 2008, the year in which we decided to move from the Philippines to Australia. When we made that decision, it was clearly the right one. By December, 2008 had shaped as our best year together since I arrived in the Philippines in 2003, and one of the best of our lives. Suddenly, neither Doreen nor I were quite so sure we were doing the right thing. A small group of friends were responsible for our doubt, Moni central among them.
Our memories of that year are a steady stream of days and nights filled with laughter, food, conversation and hilarity. We had forgotten how much we had loved that time until this week, when we dug up our photos from a decade ago. On a bittersweet night, nearly 16,000 kilometres from Rochester, we pored over images of Moni with us and the rest of that 2008 inner circle – her face smiling at us (always smiling), we smiling back through tears.
We saw Moni again in 2010, when we visited Los Baños from Australia. Next, on a work trip in 2013, with 36 hours in New York City on my way home, Moni made the trip down from Ithaca. Somehow we ended up at a friend of a friend’s party. Not knowing anybody else there, we sat on a balcony, overlooking some random New York street on a warm New York night, talking long into the next morning as the party ebbed and flowed around us. That was the last time Moni and I saw each other face to face. It is a wonderful memory. 
This is what we think of when we think of Moni: eating together (she cooked far more meals for us than we for her); chai (she taught us how to make it properly); absurd (but hilarious to us) jokes; laughter; generosity (of food, of time, and most of all of spirit); and that famous smile (few people have one so large and warm and genuine).
We’ll miss you Moni. We’ll think of you often with smiles that, if we’re lucky, will be almost as big as yours.
Love,
Adam and Doreen
Posted by Shaokui W on January 30, 2019
Moni was one of a kind. We have been a shorter stay together at Cornell University. Thinking back to when we met,Moni always have enthusiasm for everyone and everything. She was always willing to help others.The first day when we met,Moni showed me to match data by excel. I was impressed deeply by her skilled operation. We looked forward to her recovery,but we heard the heartbreaking news. Feel good when somebody miss you and feel better when somebody loves you.
Posted by Priyanka Jagtap on January 29, 2019
Thinking of Moni will always bring a smile to my face. Moni was incredibly smart, funny, knew how to turn an ordinary day into an interesting one, and the best companion for all days- running errands days, party days, sitting on the porch drinking chai days, walking through the woods days, cooking days (where Moni cooked and I ate). On really cold days, she would let me cuddle in her electric blanket. She scolded me when I made bad choices, as elder sisters do. She encouraged my career interests, advised me on the challenges I would face. Even when she was fighting cancer she still asked after the details, wanted to help in any way she could, talked through issues with me. She still played the elder sister. From talking to others, Moni was like this everyone, always taking care of people. Moni was always so strong. I know we'll all miss her. I'm thankful to Moni for being so good to me, making me feel like I always had family close by, and for being the amazing, independent, tough person she is, never afraid to speak her mind. I love you Moni, and miss you so much.
Posted by TRANG DANG on January 25, 2019
“Darling”, that’s how we used to call each other for the last 15 years. I met Moni in 2005 as classmates at UPLB. We did not get so close until we both joined SUB1 group at IRRI under Dr. Sigrid Heuer in 2006. After that, we were always together, at the lab, cafeteria, badminton court, and going out for dinner and for beaches. We were like soulmate. Moni was super smart and very kind person. She taught me to do only good things to others no matter how they treat or appreciate you. We were separated after I finished my degree at IRRI but we were always in contact. Distance did not interfere our friendship. Now that Moni is no longer available for me to talk to, I am very sad, upset and feeling lonely. “Darling”, you will forever be in my heart.
I am so sorry for her family and friends to loose her. We all will miss Moni so much.
Posted by Celeste Brown Thomas on January 25, 2019
   Deepest condolences on the loss of Moni. She was a delightful person and passionate scientist, with an unforgettable smile. I got to know and love Moni--and her family--as a fellow guest at the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge in Rochester. We will carry with us always her enthusiasm, compassion, and courage. A GoFundMe page has been set up by fellow patients for a memorial plaque at the Lodge in Moni's honor. Visit the campaign at www.gofundme.com/tribute-for-moni-singh-fund
Posted by Judy Wood on January 24, 2019
Dear Family and Friends:
My heart breaks for your loss. Moni and I got to know each other at "Bikram Hot Yogi" several years ago. We referred to each other as the "book ends" of the practice as we enjoyed the slighter cooler spots in the studio -- always laughing when we arrived and set our mats on those precious spots.  
It was also very rewarding to hear about Moni's progress with her studies at Cornell. 
The posted photos are beautiful tribute. They have made me smile after hearing this sad news. 
With the kindest regards and sincerest sympathy,
Judy
Posted by Sigrid Heuer on January 21, 2019
Namrata has been a very special person - aiming for more and a different way of life. I will always remember her as a strong, kind, confronting, caring, daring and very honest person. She has touched and changed my life and that of many others, and I will always keep her in my heart.
With lots of love for her, her family and all that loved her.
Sigrid
Posted by Shweta Singh on January 20, 2019
Our hearts are broken. Our family is deeply saddened to inform you that my lovely sister lost her 2&½ year battle with leukemia on January 19th, 2019 at 4:15 pm at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NY. Her passing was peaceful and painless.
Namrata brightened the world with her smile. She lived and died a fighter - living on her own terms, making her own rules, never abandoning her passion for living her best life. She doted on her friends. She showered love on her family. Her heart revolved around her niece. She connected with people instantly and left a lasting impression on their lives. She was generous with her love and attention. She will be forever loved and missed by every person whose life she touched.
Moni was a brilliant scientist and gifted researcher - passionate about cutting-edge agricultural research that would help farmers around the world. Her face always lit up when she talked about science, genetics, DNA, rice or the latest research revelations in her field. She wanted to devote her life to academia and research.
Even though the last years of her life were clouded by an uphill battle with cancer, she never let her spirits be dragged down by disappointment and pain. She faced her health challenges the same way she faced all of life’s struggles - with a fierce will and unflinching courage.
I will carry her in my thoughts, actions and life as long as I live. She will live in my daughter’s smile and laughter. She left an indelible impact on our hearts and lives. Her absence leaves a void that can never be filled but I know she will watching over me forever. I love you, sis.

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