ForeverMissed
My darling husband Robin lost his fight with cancer in the early hours of Sunday morning, surrounded by his family at home.
He was a loving husband, father and grandfather and will be so very dearly missed.  
Please feel free to share any pictures,memories and especially funny stories as you wish, of your times with him.


Posted by Grahame Stewart on March 4, 2021
Robin was a valued colleague at Nestle but a true friend who I have shared my retirement with.

At work Robin was a brilliant engineer and somewhat of a perfectionist, I remember him re-engineering a chocolate temperer for Drifter modifying it from a Rasch temperer (German) to incorporate a high degree of Aasted (Danish) temperer parts. It was a huge success and produced not only a better finish on the chocolate but enabled better weight control. There was however a price to pay, consisting of a 2 hour philosophical lecture from Robin about the relative merits of the German and Danish approaches to engineering and the inflexibility of the German mind compared to the Danish one. Workwise you could always rely on Robin to get the job done well and to get a detailed explanation of why it worked well.

Since retiring we spent many a day visiting a huge variety of pubs but to make our trips out seem more intellectual we usually incorporated a museum or such like on the trips out. Robins influence had us visit the Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Manchester industrial museums and the Wakefield mining museum. On those days less drinking was done because once Robin got talking to the volunteers at the museums about Victorian engineering it was difficult to prise him away.

I will miss Robin's sense of humour, sharp intellect and our discussions about football and other things. I will still picture Robin with a pint in his hand, a wicked smile on his face holding forth about a huge variety of things, be it Brexit, Trump or Spurs.
Posted by Lionel Buteux on March 3, 2021
My dear brother Robin was a kind, considerate and loving man who put himself out for others and would happily put himself second. His deep love for his wife, his children and grandchildren was clear to all of us in his wider family and others who knew him. Highly intelligent, he had an enquiring mind and, it seems to me, loved and was fascinated by the world and by the quirkiness of it all and the people who populated it. An engineering enthusiast, he thrived on grappling with and solving problems big or small, the latter sometimes to Jacqui’s frustration if his need for precision delayed redecorating! A bit of a philosopher, he would happily explore ideas with whoever would engage with him so we often had long conversations on the telephone or around the table (don’t think I ever bested him in an argument!). In my mind’s eye I can see Robin with a smile on his face, happily chatting with or regaling others and laughing or chortling over one thing or another. I’ll sorely miss you Robin. Rest easy and when/if we meet again, we can start where we left off. And, if there is a celestial Rowntrees, save me some of the specials.

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Posted by Grahame Stewart on March 4, 2021
Robin was a valued colleague at Nestle but a true friend who I have shared my retirement with.

At work Robin was a brilliant engineer and somewhat of a perfectionist, I remember him re-engineering a chocolate temperer for Drifter modifying it from a Rasch temperer (German) to incorporate a high degree of Aasted (Danish) temperer parts. It was a huge success and produced not only a better finish on the chocolate but enabled better weight control. There was however a price to pay, consisting of a 2 hour philosophical lecture from Robin about the relative merits of the German and Danish approaches to engineering and the inflexibility of the German mind compared to the Danish one. Workwise you could always rely on Robin to get the job done well and to get a detailed explanation of why it worked well.

Since retiring we spent many a day visiting a huge variety of pubs but to make our trips out seem more intellectual we usually incorporated a museum or such like on the trips out. Robins influence had us visit the Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Manchester industrial museums and the Wakefield mining museum. On those days less drinking was done because once Robin got talking to the volunteers at the museums about Victorian engineering it was difficult to prise him away.

I will miss Robin's sense of humour, sharp intellect and our discussions about football and other things. I will still picture Robin with a pint in his hand, a wicked smile on his face holding forth about a huge variety of things, be it Brexit, Trump or Spurs.
Posted by Lionel Buteux on March 3, 2021
My dear brother Robin was a kind, considerate and loving man who put himself out for others and would happily put himself second. His deep love for his wife, his children and grandchildren was clear to all of us in his wider family and others who knew him. Highly intelligent, he had an enquiring mind and, it seems to me, loved and was fascinated by the world and by the quirkiness of it all and the people who populated it. An engineering enthusiast, he thrived on grappling with and solving problems big or small, the latter sometimes to Jacqui’s frustration if his need for precision delayed redecorating! A bit of a philosopher, he would happily explore ideas with whoever would engage with him so we often had long conversations on the telephone or around the table (don’t think I ever bested him in an argument!). In my mind’s eye I can see Robin with a smile on his face, happily chatting with or regaling others and laughing or chortling over one thing or another. I’ll sorely miss you Robin. Rest easy and when/if we meet again, we can start where we left off. And, if there is a celestial Rowntrees, save me some of the specials.
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