ForeverMissed
Ruth Li-hin Chen Lin passed away peacefully in her home on Staten Island, NY on July 22, 2020. Ruth was the born in the village of Zhang Zhou, China on April 5, 1929 and was the eldest daughter of five children born to Lui Zhou Yang and Ta-Yuan Chen (TY Chen). Growing up, Ruth and her siblings were a rarity in their village in that very few girls, in particular, and boys in general were able to pursue an education beyond elementary school.  

She did her schoolwork at night after her chores were done and when she was supposed to be in bed. She recalled many nights under the bedcovers illuminated by a peanut oil lamplight to complete her studies.

Ruth was able to finish high school and began her first years of college to pursue a medical degree when civil war broke out and the Communist Revolution took over the country.

Since her father was a prominent general under Chiang Kai Shek who was the leader of the Kuomintang forces that was losing the battle against the Communists, Ruth had to flee in a dangerous journey from mainland China to the island of Taiwan in the early 1950s.

In Taiwan she continued to complete her education and received a bachelor’s degree as a science teacher from National Taiwan Normal University.  She was a popular high school biology teacher for a number of years in Taipei, Taiwan. Her daughter recalls the menagerie of creatures from school including rabbits to frogs that found a home with them during school break.   

Ruth married her husband of 62 years, Fu Hai Lin, in Taiwan until his passing in April 2018. Their first two children, Nancy and Alan were born in Taiwan and three other sons, Boris, Calvin and David, were born in the United States after they emigrated.

Ruth raised her family with creativity and love as she incorporated her skills as an educator and love of science to teach her children as they grew up.  She also was one of the founders and teachers for the Chinese American Club of Staten Island, and guided in the development of an authentic Chinese Scholar Garden on Staten Island that is only one of two in the U.S.

She also worked at the New York State Institute for Basic Research on Staten Island assisting her husband in the laboratory in his pioneer work on the HIV virus.

In her later years she enjoyed gardening, Chinese painting, teaching her children and grandchildren how to cook delicious Chinese food and how to play Chinese checkers strategically like chess. 

She is survived by her five children, her son in-law Clifford Mark Smith of Winchester, MA, daughters-in-law Yvonne Lin of Commack, NY and Courtney Lin of Zionsville, IN and seven grandchildren, Marquessa Kate, Alexander, Brianna, Rebecca, Emily, Anna and Sophie.  She is also survived by her brothers Edward Chen and his wife Rosa from Taipei, Taiwan, Dale Chen and his wife Peggy from Dallas, TX, sisters Audrey Wang and her husband Frank from Atlanta, Georgia, and Fong from Taipei, Taiwan. Ruth was predeceased by her sister Claire Huang and her brother Wei-Hsiung.

A memorial celebration of Ruth’s life will be offered after the pandemic is over.  Please leave your name and contact information so we can reach out to you at that time.

In lieu of flowers and to honor her wishes to help others in need donations can be contributed in Ruth Lin’s name at the following charity: Project Hospitality, Inc., 100 Park Avenue, Staten Island, NY. 10302 
Attn: Joshua Keller
Memo line: Food pantry and soup kitchen services in memory of Ruth Chen Lin. 


Posted by Chuan Teng on September 5, 2020
        麗痕女士千古
        懿 德 長 昭
        鄧銓, 劉真真 敬輓
                     Loving kindness is always remembered
                         Chuan and Jen-Jen Teng
Posted by Lin Family on August 14, 2020
I am grateful for my memories of my visits (along with my siblings) in the early 1970s to New York. I fondly remember my Aunt Ruth and Uncle Frank taking us to the beaches and spending time in their above ground pool (even though I spent it inside a floating ring since I hadn’t learned to swim). However, my best memories are more recent in the time that I spoke to her on the phone in the later years, got to grow closer to her, and got to know the person that my mom found great joy being around.

It is extremely rare and lovely grace that a person is able to carry a lightness and joy that overflows from within. Aunt Ruth (and Uncle Frank whom she now joins) is such a person. After her sister (Claire) passed away 15 years ago, I began to call her every few months or so. Perhaps it was because I missed my mom very much but it was also because I remember Ruth as the “laughing Aunt” whom my mother adored and would spend hours talking long distance (very expensive at the time). I got to share with her parts of my life, my love of home cooking, the laughter and happiness that came from simple things of life. 

During our calls she would remind me how much my mother loved all of her children which brought me great comfort. Aunt Ruth would also share what Uncle Frank and each of her children and grandchildren were doing and even their struggles and concerns. I could see her deep concern, love and joy that she felt for each and every one.

The term “matriarch” or even “patriarch” has so many negative connotations these days. But when lovingkindness is in the heart of these terms, an amazing freedom is inherited by the family members. I can see such freedom living on in my cousins and their children who have the opportunity to flourish as unique and deeply loved individuals. 

My Aunt’s (and Uncle’s) deep love and care lives on within my cousins, grandchildren, and people who were blessed to know them. It is very difficult when they are no longer physically with us now. I know I will miss talking with my Aunt and will grieve with you as many of you do as well. 

The fruit of planted love is growing self-acceptance. This is a most precious gift. It may not be the realized for some time, but when we remember the feelings of being loved, let it water us from within, take the chance to express it outwardly to those whom we remain in contact; we may come to realize how we really remain connected by the seen and unseen bonds that live on. 

Today...I choose to remember the love that I got to experience through my Aunt Ruth. May the memory of her love (which comes from a Higher Love) comfort and tenderly embrace each of my cousins, family members and friends.

- Tom
Posted by Bernard Beaulieu on August 12, 2020
A truly amazing woman who exemplified fortitude and perseverance throughout her life. I look forward to hearing more of her life’s stories.
Beau

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Recent Tributes
Posted by Chuan Teng on September 5, 2020
        麗痕女士千古
        懿 德 長 昭
        鄧銓, 劉真真 敬輓
                     Loving kindness is always remembered
                         Chuan and Jen-Jen Teng
Posted by Lin Family on August 14, 2020
I am grateful for my memories of my visits (along with my siblings) in the early 1970s to New York. I fondly remember my Aunt Ruth and Uncle Frank taking us to the beaches and spending time in their above ground pool (even though I spent it inside a floating ring since I hadn’t learned to swim). However, my best memories are more recent in the time that I spoke to her on the phone in the later years, got to grow closer to her, and got to know the person that my mom found great joy being around.

It is extremely rare and lovely grace that a person is able to carry a lightness and joy that overflows from within. Aunt Ruth (and Uncle Frank whom she now joins) is such a person. After her sister (Claire) passed away 15 years ago, I began to call her every few months or so. Perhaps it was because I missed my mom very much but it was also because I remember Ruth as the “laughing Aunt” whom my mother adored and would spend hours talking long distance (very expensive at the time). I got to share with her parts of my life, my love of home cooking, the laughter and happiness that came from simple things of life. 

During our calls she would remind me how much my mother loved all of her children which brought me great comfort. Aunt Ruth would also share what Uncle Frank and each of her children and grandchildren were doing and even their struggles and concerns. I could see her deep concern, love and joy that she felt for each and every one.

The term “matriarch” or even “patriarch” has so many negative connotations these days. But when lovingkindness is in the heart of these terms, an amazing freedom is inherited by the family members. I can see such freedom living on in my cousins and their children who have the opportunity to flourish as unique and deeply loved individuals. 

My Aunt’s (and Uncle’s) deep love and care lives on within my cousins, grandchildren, and people who were blessed to know them. It is very difficult when they are no longer physically with us now. I know I will miss talking with my Aunt and will grieve with you as many of you do as well. 

The fruit of planted love is growing self-acceptance. This is a most precious gift. It may not be the realized for some time, but when we remember the feelings of being loved, let it water us from within, take the chance to express it outwardly to those whom we remain in contact; we may come to realize how we really remain connected by the seen and unseen bonds that live on. 

Today...I choose to remember the love that I got to experience through my Aunt Ruth. May the memory of her love (which comes from a Higher Love) comfort and tenderly embrace each of my cousins, family members and friends.

- Tom
Posted by Bernard Beaulieu on August 12, 2020
A truly amazing woman who exemplified fortitude and perseverance throughout her life. I look forward to hearing more of her life’s stories.
Beau
her Life

Life Lessons and Stories over a Cup of Tea

Growing up one of our favorite memories was after our family dinners were done, mom and dad would brew a pot of Chinese tea and we would talk for awhile longer as we savored the end of a day and breathed in the fragrant aroma of jasmine or pungent oolong as our hands were warmed by our teacups. 

 Our conversations were sometimes expansive and sometimes just covered the day’s events. It was through these tea times that our parents life stories emerged - rich in detail, full of love, loss and hope. They intertwined life lessons that they had learned through the years with the sayings of great Chinese philosophers. Perhaps we didn’t remember all the sayings but we will always remember the time that they spent with us every single day. 
 
Perhaps that in itself is a life lesson - how valuable time is and particularly when it’s freely given with a warm cup of tea. 

Ruth Li-hin Chen Lin Biography – April 5, 1929 – July 22, 2020

Ruth Li-hin Chen Lin passed away peacefully in her home on Staten Island, NY on July 22, 2020. Ruth was the born in the village of Zhang Zhou, China on April 5, 1929 and was the eldest daughter of five children born to Lui Zhou Yang and Ta-Yuan Chen (TY Chen). Growing up, Ruth and her siblings were a rarity in their village in that very few girls, in particular, and boys in general were able to pursue an education beyond elementary school.  She did her schoolwork at night after her chores were done and when she was supposed to be in bed. She recalled many nights under the bedcovers illuminated by a peanut oil lamplight to complete her studies. Ruth was able to complete high school and began her first years of college to pursue a medical degree when civil war broke out and the Communist Revolution took over the country.

Since her father was a prominent general under Chiang Kai Shek who was the leader of the Kuomintang forces that was losing the battle against the Communists, Ruth had to flee from mainland China to Taiwan in the early 1950s.

In Taiwan she continued to complete her education and received a bachelor’s degree as a science teacher from National Taiwan Normal University.  She was a popular high school biology teacher for a number of years in Taipei, Taiwan. Her daughter recalls the menagerie of creatures from school including rabbits to frogs that found a home with them during school break.   Ruth married her husband of 62 years, Fu Hai Lin, in Taiwan until his passing in April 2018. Their first two children, Nancy and Alan were born in Taiwan and three other sons, Boris, Calvin and David, were born in the United States after they emigrated.

Ruth raised her family with creativity and love as she incorporated her skills as an educator and love of science to teach her children as they grew up.  She also was one of the founders and teachers for the Chinese American Club of Staten Island, and guided in the development of an authentic Chinese Scholar Garden on Staten Island that is one of only two in the country. She also worked at the New York State Institute for Basic Research on Staten Island assisting her husband in the laboratory in his pioneer work on the HIV virus.

In her later years she enjoyed gardening, Chinese painting, teaching her children and grandchildren how to cook delicious Chinese food and how to play Chinese checkers strategically like chess. 

She is survived by her five children, her son in-law Clifford Mark Smith of Winchester, MA, daughters-in-law Yvonne Lin of Commack, NY and Courtney Lin of Zionsville, IN and seven grandchildren, Marquessa Kate, Alexander, Brianna, Rebecca, Emily, Anna and Sophie.  She is also survived by her brothers Edward Chen and his wife Rosa from Taipei, Taiwan, Dale Chen and his wife Peggy from Dallas, TX, sisters Audrey Wang and her husband Frank from Atlanta, Georgia, and Fong from Taipei, Taiwan. Ruth was predeceased by her sister Claire Huang and brother Wei-Hsiang

A memorial celebration of Ruth’s life will be offered after the pandemic is over.

For those who wish to offer their thoughts, pictures and condolences to share with the family and to be on the list to be notified in the future of the post pandemic celebration of Ruth can leave their contact information on this site. 

In lieu of flowers - donations can be contributed in Ruth Lin’s name at the following charity: Project Hospitality, Inc., 100 Park Avenue, Staten Island, NY. 10302 
Attn: Joshua Keller
Memo line: Food pantry and soup kitchen services In memory of Ruth Chen Lin. 


Recent stories

Ruth Lin - the five star home Chef.

Shared by Lin Family on August 10, 2020
Anyone who was fortunate enough to enjoy one of my mom’s home cooked meals may be surprised that she didn’t know how to cook until she emigrated to the States. As a child in mainland China and when she worked as a teacher in Taiwan she had family cooks who could  provide the daily meals.
   When she came here with two kids in tow (my brother Alan and me) to join my dad (who was in graduate school) she had to learn how to cook. 
   She said that she pored through all the Chinese cookbooks and figured it out to not only cook the most delicious meals from scratch but to do it economically on dad’s graduate student’s limited funds. 
   As their family grew, she started a garden to supplement with fresh vegetables. Sometimes, I recall, as she worked the garden she had one young child strapped to her back and another in the front. She used strips of sheets to create a double sided “baby bjorn” to keep them safe and close by. At the time, being a child, I had no understanding of how remarkable it was that she was able to do that. 

    No matter how difficult the times were she was always happy to share her wonderful meals with our friends and family. My brothers and I will always remember the delicious meals and mom as being so central to how we perceived what home was. Mom’s kitchen was the heart of our home. She used very simple tools, no fancy gadgets. The pots and pans were dented but the meals that emerged were sublime. 
     So now the meal making is passed on to us and our children. Some of the wonderful dishes include Chinese variation of pulled pork, scallion pancakes, crispy sautéed shrimp and with vegetables, tofu and mushrooms in soy sauce, steamed buns, fried dumplings, hand pulled noodles and pearl meatballs to name a few.  The tradition continues ♥️