ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of our loved one, William Carreo, 81 years old, born on December 18, 1939, and passed away on February 4, 2021. We will remember him forever.  Please play tribute below with a note, a picture, or a story.   

And please, consider these options for In Memoriam Donations, to bring his legacy forward.  

  • Action for a Better Community -   William served on the board of directors previously to drive their mission of  eliminating poverty in local Rochester communities, and promoting and providing opportunities for the underprivileged. https://www.abcinfo.org/donate/  (please select “In memory of William R. Carreo”)
  • St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital  -  with a mission to advance cures and means of prevention, so no child is denied treatment based on race, religion or a family’s ability to pay.  https://www.stjude.org/donate/  (option to write: In memory of William Carreo)
Posted by Steph Foley on February 18, 2021
Just this last summer Uncle Bill stopped by a little gathering (outside, distanced!). He waited for a quiet in conversation and said “Does anyone here practice mindfulness?” This embodied a few ways I think of Uncle Bill. He would always just pop over to the house (or just the yard this year) and chat a bit and leave a short while later. He liked being a conversation starter (Mindfulness. Discuss!). And he liked discussing spirituality related and other “deep” topics. It will be very strange and sad indeed to not see him pop by now.

And what a yard he created- So beautiful! I remember eating mint leaves from those gardens when I was a kid. 
Posted by John Welch on February 17, 2021
Carol and family.
I want to express our condolences over your loss.
We lived next door to the Carreos on Chandler Street back in the 50' and 60's.
We always enjoyed our friendship with them all.
When I was young, maybe 10, I remember Bill had a very early model Corvette. Pretty neat.
Bill also had a bb pistol and target and once in a while he would bring it out and we would shoot it.
I remember him carefully showing me how it worked so I didn't hurt myself.

In looking at the photos it's easy to see he led a wonderfully happy and loving life.

Once again, our condolences.
John, Jillian and David Welch
Posted by Deb Oakley on February 17, 2021
I was saddened to read about Bill's passing and extend my heartfelt condolences to Carol and family. Bill was a big part of Larry's DSS-life and beyond. I have pictures in my mind of Bill and the administrative crew playing basket ball for some fund raiser. They all were being kids again, I think. [The actual photos of that are here somewhere!] Of course, Bill, being a groomsman in our wedding was memorable as well and Larry would be amongst Bill's many admirers to say he will surely be missed by family and friends.
Posted by Ed MacDonald on February 17, 2021
My fondest memory of Mr Carreo is of a man who abhorred silence. He would come and visit Paul and I while we were roommates in Arlington. I would wake up in the morning to have my breakfast. I'd say "good morning" and then sit and watch TV -- secretly playing game in my head counting the seconds to see how long it took him to break the silence. I can't pinpoint exactly what the specific cues were, but his body language SCREAMED: "I need to say things to you!".

Sometimes, There were multiple intakes of breath as he started to say something, but then opted not to -- suspecting, I think, that I wanted my quiet time. Eventually, he couldn't hold it in any longer and the conversation just burst out! "What are you watching on TV Ed? Oh, that looks interesting. What are you planning to do today? Oh, grabbing lunch? Where at? Oh, that sounds interesting, what type of food do they serve there? Are you going to walk there? Or take your bicycle? ..."

Other times, he just pulled out a newspaper (he ALWAYS had one!) and started reading headlines. It took me a while to figure out that he wasn't necessarily reading the newspaper to me... it was more of a fishing expedition. If I simply didn't respond, he would just keep reading headlines and adding commentary -- waiting for someone to engage. And once someone engaged... he pounced.

He'll be dearly missed.

Posted by Paul Carreo on February 17, 2021
(On behalf of Jane Lynch from Legacy.com, February 16, 2021)

Bill was a great promoter of social equity. I worked for him in the 80's . He was a brilliant and strategic manager and I developed my skills under his watchful eye. In the late 80's, under welfare reform, he helped implement an alternative to welfare, which received a Harvard Innovations In Government award. I owe my successful career to learning from Bill. May he be in peace now.
Jane Lynch
Coworker
Posted by Janet Dill on February 14, 2021
Carol
So sorry to hear about Bill’s passing. We were the Welch family next door to Aggie’s. I remember Bill and Kathy so well. They were a big part of my childhood. I still remember hanging out in the back yards on Chandler St.
My prayers for you and your family
Sincerely
Janet (Welch) Dill
Posted by William Michatek on February 14, 2021
To Bill's family I offer my sincere prayers as you mourn his loss. I was a classmate at St. Bernard's Seminary and enjoyed his friendship and laughs we had. I was assigned to Holy Trinity in Webster in1969-75 and then 2003-11 when I retired as pastor. In those times I would run into him with some regularity. He was always an engaging conversationalist and witty. Keep smiling as you remember h
Posted by Paul Carreo on February 14, 2021
Please find also Dad's obituary that ran today on the Rochester D&C. Please in lieu of flowers, the family encourages you to make a donation to Action for a Better Community or St. Jude's linked above.*

https://obits.democratandchronicle.com/obituaries/democratandchronicle/obituary.aspx?n=william-robert-carreo&pid=197755357

*or homemade pizzas or gin martinis... of a 1950's corvette, if you really knew Dad ;) 
Posted by Jim Gillio on February 13, 2021
Sorry to hear of his passing . Fun memories of riding with Bill in his 1950's era Corvette through the country roads of Orleans county and joining U. Dean in homemade pizza deliveries to Bill at St Bernard's.
Posted by Paul McCarthy on February 13, 2021
I was stunned earlier today then, greatly saddened to learn of Bill's passing. My sincere condolences to Carol and his children Julie, Paul, and Jennie and their families at this difficult time.

Bill and I met in grammar school and became fast friends during our time at St Monica School and then St. Andrew's Seminary. We "free ranged" the neighborhood on foot then the 19 ward on bikes and greater Rochester area with cars! The library on Arnet Blvd was a favorite haunt and Bill introduced me to humorous series of books that I still remember. We were frequent visitors.

Genesee Valley Parks - both east and west of the river watching baseball, playing on the merry-go- round, the shelters and as we got older cannoeing on    River and on occasion going up Red creek "exploring its farther reaches. We sometimes deliberately overturned the canoe - just because we could! Hamlin Beach was also attractive both for the beach and the bonfires that we had there.

1953 was a banner years. We graduated from St. Monica and and 2-3 of our classmates made the same decision to transition to St. Andrew's Seminary. Mind you, we HAD to wear black/dark blue suits, white shirts and tie to school and take 2 buses to get to the seminary's location, somewhat remote at that time.Getting home was equally tedious!

It was a rigorous curriculum but there were hilarious side events. There was a pig farm adjacent to the seminary and during a break for lunch and a chance to exercise outside so we would race to the back "lawn" - several acres of grass. We played football, keep-away etc. Some of the students thought it would be great sport and challenge to "ride" the large, adult pigs. It was crazy, probably stupid but hilarious. I don't think Bill or I rose to the challenge but it was certainly entertaining. REMEMBER, we were still teenagers. The suits etc took a serious beating.

I left the seminary in 1957 but Bill continued on with a pretty serious focus. Humorously, I had decided that I wanted women to play a greater part in my life. Bill took a bit longer to arrive at that decision.

I married Lucy Knefley (who I had met through a friend at St. John Fisher College) in 1962. Bill and Don Dowling (both still seminarians) were the altar servers at our wedding. For that I was very grateful.

We lost contact for many years (limited internet and no social media) but the advent of Facebook allowed us to reconnect. Visits to Rochester were few and far between but about 8-9 years ago Bill and I had the chance to visit for the better part of a morning and afternoon. We really reconnected.We visited some of our old haunts, walked along Lake Ontario one of our favorites.

In our conversations I learned much more of what Bill had accomplished personally, family and career wise and both was impressed and proud to have had him as best friend. In today's lingo BFF. His accomplishments for the community and the marginalized are like a bell that rings forever!


Posted by Sharon Ambrose on February 13, 2021
I had the privilege of meeting Bill and Carol when I taught their three children at Holy Trinity School. Bill's warmth, friendliness, and genuine caring always shone through. My condolences to Carol, Julie, Paul, and Jennie upon the loss of your husband and father, a man who was in love with life and his family. All of you will be in my prayers.
Sharon Fear Ambrose
Posted by Ted Wiedenman on February 10, 2021
Your candle stays lit through all you have imparted upon me. Thank you for the kindness. Thank you for the wisdom. Thank you for the laughs. Rest in peace my friend!

Leave a Tribute

 
Recent Tributes
Posted by Steph Foley on February 18, 2021
Just this last summer Uncle Bill stopped by a little gathering (outside, distanced!). He waited for a quiet in conversation and said “Does anyone here practice mindfulness?” This embodied a few ways I think of Uncle Bill. He would always just pop over to the house (or just the yard this year) and chat a bit and leave a short while later. He liked being a conversation starter (Mindfulness. Discuss!). And he liked discussing spirituality related and other “deep” topics. It will be very strange and sad indeed to not see him pop by now.

And what a yard he created- So beautiful! I remember eating mint leaves from those gardens when I was a kid. 
Posted by John Welch on February 17, 2021
Carol and family.
I want to express our condolences over your loss.
We lived next door to the Carreos on Chandler Street back in the 50' and 60's.
We always enjoyed our friendship with them all.
When I was young, maybe 10, I remember Bill had a very early model Corvette. Pretty neat.
Bill also had a bb pistol and target and once in a while he would bring it out and we would shoot it.
I remember him carefully showing me how it worked so I didn't hurt myself.

In looking at the photos it's easy to see he led a wonderfully happy and loving life.

Once again, our condolences.
John, Jillian and David Welch
Posted by Deb Oakley on February 17, 2021
I was saddened to read about Bill's passing and extend my heartfelt condolences to Carol and family. Bill was a big part of Larry's DSS-life and beyond. I have pictures in my mind of Bill and the administrative crew playing basket ball for some fund raiser. They all were being kids again, I think. [The actual photos of that are here somewhere!] Of course, Bill, being a groomsman in our wedding was memorable as well and Larry would be amongst Bill's many admirers to say he will surely be missed by family and friends.
his Life

William Robert Carreo, In Memorial Obituary

William Robert Carreo (81), son of B. Arnold Carreo and Agnes Niedermayer Carreo, loving husband, father, and Papa - passed peacefully on February 4, 2021. He is predeceased by his beloved sister and brother-in-law, Kathleen and Michael Tobin. Bill is survived by his faithful wife, Carol, of 53 years; daughter Julie and her husband Adam; son Paul; and daughter Jennie, her husband Chris, and their children Matthew (11) & Patrick (7). Bill was a lifelong Rochester & Webster resident, loyal family man, activist, and humanitarian. He always brought a joyful exuberance to the room. Those who knew and loved him best would say he was sharp-witted, deliciously irreverent, intellectually gifted, and full of gentle sweetness. 

Bill studied at St. Bernard's Seminary before receiving a Master’s of Social Work from the University of Buffalo. He built his career in public service, advocating for community action & social welfare reform. He was a dedicated Monroe County community leader for 33 years, serving as Deputy Director for Social Services and as a board member for organizations like Action for a Better Community. After retirement, he continued to volunteer for many local outreach organizations. He spent his life in pursuit of justice and equality for the disenfranchised, giving a voice to the voiceless. 

Bill was a champion golfer, who won countless Rochester tournaments alongside his mentor and uncle, Dean Carreo. He was a master gardener, known for his colorful and beautiful yard. Bill was a voracious reader, with a passion for works from Shakespeare to Asimov. He was a lover of animals and nature, always at peace in the Adirondack mountains, fishing in Tampa Bay, and kayaking in Casey Park. He was a wonderful artist, who loved to draw and paint Peanuts characters. He doted on his grandsons; teaching them to garden, draw, and fish. He fostered their imaginations, giving them opportunities for adventure, and imparting the confidence to dream big. Bill felt great pride for the family he created and in his last days said his family was his greatest love and most cherished accomplishment.

May you sing with the angels, dance in a field of sunflowers, hit the longest drives, and feel the loving light of your family shining upon your face for all eternity, Papa. You are forever in our hearts. 

Please
take a moment to visit our memorial site, share a story and pay tribute to William: www.forevermissed.com/williamcarreo 

In keeping with William’s advocacy for humanity, we ask you choose a donation to either:
  • Action for a Better Community - William served on the board of directors advancing their mission of eliminating poverty in local Rochester communities, promoting and providing opportunities for those in need. https://www.abcinfo.org/donate/ (please select “In memory of William Carreo”)
  • St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital - advancing cures and means of prevention, so no child is denied treatment https://www.stjude.org/donate/
Recent stories

I'll always remember...

Shared by Paul Carreo on February 14, 2021

...The last time I got Dad into a kayak. I was home in Rochester from Ireland risking a visit to see my parents just this last September. The lockdown had been grim enough already on the emerald island, but the real kick in the teeth was that any semblance of summer weather days had skipped over us entirely this year. I had been nostalgic for Fall in upstate New York, so imagine my delight when I got the best of both worlds for my visit: the autumnal turning of the leaves and a warm sunny Indian summer!   

My parents and I shared a lot of adventures for this time.  We took Sunday drives around the Genesee canal, sat around campfires, ate Bill Grays cheeseburgers, & visited country stores in search of the perfect pumpkin pie.  We even rented a place up on Fourth Lake in the majesty of the Adirondack Mountains, in homage to our many family trips to Raquette Lake. The sunny days were perfect as we toured the local Hardware Store of Old Forge, and the great American diners of a lost world.   Those days faded too quickly, like the golden autumnal sunset dipping across a burnt sienna horizon, as we toasted our happy hour cocktails at the splashing loons from our lakeside Adirondack chairs. 

The weeks spent together, from Adirondacks and back to Rochester, were full of fond memories like these, streaks of nostalgia stoking the fires along with the forging of new memories together.  But by far the time I remember most, was the drive I took with dad to Casey Park, Ontario, on my birthday.   We jerry-rigged his kayak to his open trunk, although Dad played coy about whether he would use it himself. Always the delegator of tasks, I think he just wanted to watch me using it and being happy in this peaceful small lake oasis that had always been his private little paradise. We listened to triumphantly drumming symphonies on the drive out and as I got the kayak out, Dad bellowed out his rendition of Happy Birthday, before cracking open a small ceremonial airplane bottle of bourbon to share. He told me to take my time and enjoy the paddling, while he sat dockside fishing meditatively. I had a great commune with nature on that stretch of water, snapping photos along the way of sunbathing turtles and mighty grey herons. I could see the peace of this park coming to life with every emerging color-pop, and a kaleidoscopic overhang of maple leafs.   

On my return to the dock, my dad started to beam at me and seemed to project that he wanted his turn now, not content to allow this moment pass by as a mere vicarious one.   And said, “maybe I’ll give it a try if you think you can hoist me in.” His hips had become so frail through the years, his steps were small, his body always teetering. I was nervous at first but feigned confidence so that he would surrender his trust. I helped him sit at the edge and swing his legs down to the mooring spot, we got his life jacket on and stood him up behind the kayak. I came behind him and gave him a solid bearhug to hoist him off the ground, he felt lighter than I expected, and he went still like a doll. I felt the rough skin of his face on my neck, and his quietness as he held his breath with a twinge of pain and expectancy. I dropped him in with ease, and with a push he was gliding off into his perfect paradise.  

I stood and watched him head off for his own adventure, paddling lightly, no longer hindered by his fragility, coasting along with ease.  He would only look back once to wave.  He would pause often looking off pensively along the water’s edge.  He would hoot and holler with joy. And then he would round the small lake’s bend, and disappear into his own eternal wilderness. I am overwhelmed now at this memory, filled with joy, sadness, grief and celebration… and I am haunted by the majestic beauty of these waters, as they continue to whisper the music of my father.  

Paul Robert Carreo