ForeverMissed
This memorial website was created in memory of Bob Smith, beloved husband, father, and grandfather.

Please enjoy looking through each tab, TRIBUTES/ABOUT, LIFE, GALLERY and STORIES. Then, if your would like to, please add your own tribute, story and or photos to help us all remember Bob. 

Should you wish to make a memorial donation in Bob's name, please do so at:
Ageless Reparatory Theatre,  A.R.T.  https://renolittletheater.org/art-at-rlt 
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, OLLI  https://olli.unr.edu
Reno Art Museum  https://www.nevadaart.org/give/support
or the charity of your choice as there are so many that are in need of support right now.
Posted by Terry Smith on February 14, 2021
Happiness was been being married to my best friend and sharing over 70 years of wonderful memories together.  So very lucky in so many ways. We enjoyed so many of the same things,. travel, great food and wine, music and theatre. Since teen years Bob loved bridge & tennis, took up skiing at age 40 and enjoyed golf from his 30s into his mid 80s. He was a 2 time past cancer survivor but this last one was so quick and unexpected. He went into the hospital and was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer on Dec. 20th. Not a candidate for surgery and/or chemo, Hospice brought him home Christmas afternoon. For many years Bob was an avid birder and a mixed group of feathered friends kept him company in the large evergreen he was able to view from his bed during those days when it felt good to delay getting up.. We had 5 precious days with him before, with four of his family surrounding him, he left us. He will be forever loved and he will be forever missed.

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Posted by Terry Smith on February 14, 2021
Happiness was been being married to my best friend and sharing over 70 years of wonderful memories together.  So very lucky in so many ways. We enjoyed so many of the same things,. travel, great food and wine, music and theatre. Since teen years Bob loved bridge & tennis, took up skiing at age 40 and enjoyed golf from his 30s into his mid 80s. He was a 2 time past cancer survivor but this last one was so quick and unexpected. He went into the hospital and was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer on Dec. 20th. Not a candidate for surgery and/or chemo, Hospice brought him home Christmas afternoon. For many years Bob was an avid birder and a mixed group of feathered friends kept him company in the large evergreen he was able to view from his bed during those days when it felt good to delay getting up.. We had 5 precious days with him before, with four of his family surrounding him, he left us. He will be forever loved and he will be forever missed.
his Life

Then til Now

Taking his last bow, Robert (Bob) Smith exited stage left on December 30, 2020. One of his great joys was performing in Reno’s Ageless Repertory Theatre, (A.R.T.) for 13 years. His last performance was co-staring in the “The Sunshine Boys” the last week of January, 2020, before Covid arrived and shut everything down. Bob studied 2 years at Carlton College where his claim to fame was being a cast member of the world premier of "The Caucasian Chalk Circle".  Moving west, Bob graduated with a degree in Speech from the University of Washington, Seattle, where he met his wife, Terry Wellington. They were married on September 17, 1950. Both avid theatre fans, a belated honeymoon in New York allowed them to see 8 plays in 5 days. While there, Bob's draft notice arrived and, returning to Seattle, he was inducted into the Army at Fort Lewis and served 2 years. He was discharged in San Luis Obispo, California, where he became a radio announcer at KVEC, also hosting a late night jazz show with "After Hours", by Erskine Hawkins as its theme music (it's the background music you hear)  Bob helped put the TV station on the air and became it’s first newscaster.  After a short stint at UC Berkley he began a life time vocation filling many sales positions with various companies and many moves to different cities and states. Their daughter, Kieron, was born in 1958 in Kansas City, Missouri even though they lived in Kansas City, Kansas.  Bob retired as a stockbroker from Jefferies & Co. in Los Angeles, CA. and, with his wife Terry, arrived in Reno in 1980 having purchased a home in Riverbend. Wine buffs that they had become, they quickly expanded the house with a game room over a small basement and wine cellar.  A boat on Lake Powell consumed their months in spring and fall for many years.  From 1987 to 1993 they leased the house and went on the road full time in a motor home visiting almost all 50 states including Alaska.  Bob found his special place volunteering as the Reno Art Museum librarian for 15 years, originally setting up and cataloging the expanding collection. There was always an annual trip to Ashland Ore. and Bob loved to boast that he had seen every one of Shakespeare's plays, many, more than once. Every fall and winter found them at the Reno Philharmonic and the Reno Chamber Orchestra and Bob never missed the Festival of Chamber Music each year from Christmas to New Year’s Eve. They also loved traditional jazz festivals and took many cruises with favorite bands.  He and Terry were original members of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, (OLLI), University of Nevada's expanded learning program for Seniors. Bob most loved the Poetry and Memoir classes but enjoyed many classes and lectures over the past 14 years. Through OLLI, he became a simulated patient for UNR Medical School students for many years and Bob was pleased that he was able to donate his body to the UNR School of Medicine.. He read some of his life stories while daughter, Kieron, recorded him before he and we said our last goodbyes. Surviving Bob are his wife, Terry Wellington Smith, his daughter, Kieron Smith Chambers (husband Greg), and his three grandsons, Kyle L. Jay (wife Molly), Preston Alan Tuschall and Jake Mason Chambers.  Bob was a gentleman and his kindness and soft humor will be missed not only by his family but, by the many who knew him.

I'll miss you, Daddy

This is the last photo I took of my parents. December 29, 2020. It was the last time my Dad sat up, the last time my parents talked of the birds outside their window. What struck me was the sheer intimacy of the moment. The glue that had held these two lovers, two friends, two people who had spent their entire adulthood together. Over 70 years. The light from outside was shining back in on them. One of my Dad’s photographs of Greece hung on the wall. I knew this was my last moment to observe and capture the first two people I loved in this world. I am still moved. Later that day, I told my Dad that it was a great adventure and that he was a terrific father. I said “I’ll miss you, Daddy” and he replied, “I’ll miss you too". Those are the last words we spoke.
Recent stories

The early days

Shared by Terry Smith on February 20, 2021
Bob grew up mostly in Highland Park, Illinois. His parents were Mason and Gertrude C. Smith.
In the process of compiling this memorial, a great joy has been uncovering tidbits squirreled away in old photo albums and other boxes rarely, if ever, visited.  We found ourselves with many old boxes of family memorabilia after Bob became the family patriarch and, at 91, the oldest living male he had found on his family tree genealogy searches .
Obviously a precocious little guy, his mother, Trudy, had recorded several things for posterity.
At 2 Bob "learned nursery rhymes and tried to sing a nursery song with quite an idea of tune"
2 1/2  "learned to count to 20 and recognized 8 letters of the alphabet and asked for things in complete sentences with creative word pronunciation.  He could recite pages of stories from My Bookhouse.  When on a driving trip he sang songs lustily with his parents.......Mary Had a Little Lamb, Bye, Bye Bunting, Rock a Bye Baby and The sidewalks of New York."   Bob was reading at 4yrs & for the rest of his life always had a book nearby when there was free time.  
Bob always was the one person in any group that knew all the words to all the songs so was always welcome at singalongs which he loved.  His traditional jazz favorite was "Amazing Grace" and he also could sing all the verses,